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Ok now that your real requirements are understood, yes you can carry jerry cans anywhere they will fit and have custom mounts manufactured.
Why not use one of those siphon hoses that have a marble or ball bearing that you shake and the fuel flows rapidly out of?
That is much simpler and easier and doesn't use any energy.
 

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Discussion Starter #22

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Discussion Starter #23

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Discussion Starter #25
I
Jerry cans can be transported on their sides (flat). They aren't vented until opened.
I agree that there is no venting system on jerry cans, but I haven't seen one manufacturer design and make a jerry can holder that secures a can while it lies on its large flat side. Which indicates to me that no one has confidence on the functionality of the seals on jerry cans when they as subjected to gasoline 24/7. I am sure the seals work well when the cans when used as designed (with the filler hole is at the top of the can). I have a nice jerry can - I guess I could fill it up and store it upside down to insure the seal is saturated and see how long it will take the seal to fail.....
The company from Australia got back to me and included their instruction manual for the aux tank- they sell a very well designed system that allows you to fill both the factory tank and their aux tank from the the trucks factory gas cap. Their system has it's own fuel sender, transfer pump and auto shut off when all the fuel has been moved into the factory tank. I got back to them specifying how I intended to utilize their aux tank.... with a seperate short filler tube with it own gas cap. (access to the cap and filler tube would be from the forward end of the wheel well). I am waiting to hear back from them next week.
 

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Len: Any hard mounted tank, at least to my mine suggest or requires that it be plumbed into the existing fuel system, which likely will trigger the wrath of the great and powerful CARB. Jerry cans sound like a better method.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Rocky, thank you for the input - I thought there might be CARB issues using the plumbing supplied by the Australian company.... I will give AeroTank a call and ask them about my plans for filling an aux tank. They are in San Bernardino in CA so they would know the CA regs for aux tanks. Depending on the outcome of that discussion I may just end up building s platform / skid plate to secure two 5 gal cans under the truck where the proposed Australian aux tank would go...
 

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I have seen Jerry cans stored flat for transport in several military vehicle applications, but like you, not in civilian ones. However, I don't see any advantage to storing them upside down. I'm not sure the seal stays any drier in one position over another. The jostling while a vehicle is in motion and fuel expansion when it warms up makes sure of that. If the can is tilted slightly when filling it, making the filler opening the high point, enough fuel can be loaded that the seal is wet when upright and stationary. Me thinks most of the world has greater confidence in that seal than you do, and for good reason. Btw, the seals cost very little, are widely available, and easy to change out.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Hi pfshoen - thank you for the input. I wasn't going to store the cans upside down (I was proposing a method to test the seals) - I have never seen anyone store cans on their side with fuel in them. And I believe you are correct about the fuel jostling while a vehicle is in motion and fuel expansion... So I will investigate a form & fit design tomorrow. I finally got a quote tonight from the Australian company I had contacted. Production and shipping will cost a little over 1K. If I can design a system to carry two 5 gallon cans safely and securely under the truck I can buy a lot of seals and gas with the money I save. Not that I doubt your statement regarding military vehicles carrying cans on their side, but I would like to see one or two examples... can you share the type of vehicle you saw this on. I will google them out. When I was in the Army ('72 thru '75) I only saw them mounted vertically.
 

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The photos above are of the LRDG during WWII in North Africa. However those appear to be GI cans, not Jerry cans. Of course, Jerry cans are less likely to leak than GI type. If you poke around on the internet, you'll find the topic has been addressed. If stored on their side, the cans would have to be moved upright to fill, so conventional mounting is more convenient in that respect, and one reason it's the first choice. Mounting the cans underneath sounds like a good idea. If you can make it work, share some pics. Prob best to incorporate a skid plate into the mount to protect them from rocks and road rash. The cans are thin skinned compared to most fuel tanks.
 
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