Defender Source Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I am hoping someone can please advise.

I have a 1999 TD5 sitting in my garage on an engine stand. I took the engine out and removed the clutch/flywheel. Now on the stand, I want to swap the gaskets/seals and throw new rings and con-rod bearings into it. The purpose for the refresh is wanting to get it ready for a stage 3 or 4 upgrade.

My question is about timing. I know LR sells two pins to keep the timing in check, but now I cant use the flywheel timing pin. I just have the cam pin. Once I remove the head and start rotating the crank shaft to replace all the rings, timing will be totally out of wack. I am a little confused on how I would restore timing once I finish getting the piston rings changed.

Sarosh
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
if I understand correctly you're stripping the engine in order to overhaul/rebuild, if such is the case why bother with timing upon disassembly?. once assembly is nearly complete with all timing components in place then you begin to align your marks.
timing is one of the last steps of engine assembly. may I suggest, if you have never disassembled an engine to the point you plan to go, please do lots of research, read and if possible have someone with experience to look after your work on every step and or assist, guide and counsel as you assemble. mark orientation and location of components prior to disassembly, document everything make notes take pictures and use a torque wrench.
there are many important steps which can make or break and engine build, unfortunately a failure during build often ends in catastrophe.
your engine being a 95 as stated is not a TD5 it is more than likely a 300 TDI.
best of luck, if successful you will have earned bragging rights. if not you would have learned a very expensive lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply.

I have torn down a lot of engines but i haven't really rebuilt one completely and timed an engine. Even assembly is straight forward and the workshop manuals provide a lot of information for assembly. The TD5 is a an easy engine to work on especially since i am just remove piston and not actually rebuilding the whole thing. I guess all I need to figure out is what top dead center is once assembly is complete to get the timing right.

I was trying to inspect rod bearings and swap piston rings without taking the front cover off and also do the head gasket.

All i have is an issue with oil leaks and turbo which would whistle on acceleration. I don't even know what it feels like to hit rev limiter on our engines but i haven't yet. It would just rev out, until i heard a whistling sound as which i have no more power/torque and need to switch gears.

Plan was to upgrade the turbo and add an upgraded intercooler because both are pretty shot on my motor. Still thinking about who is going to provide the tune.

It is a 1999 TD5.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,250 Posts
So you are working on rebuilding a 10P. I STRONGLY suggest replacing the head. It's a common known failure on the 10P.. not an IF but a WHEN. Especially if you are planning on power upgrades, this should really be done. The replacement is best purchased from Turner Engineering LDF500160 TD5 Cylinder Head - Early | Turnerengineering Also, you can source may of your rebuild parts from them. Yup, it's not a cheap endeavor, but if you don't do it at this point, you'll cook your engine in no time, that's for certain.

Your whistling sound is very likely a warped exhaust manifold, which you should upgrade if you are planning a power upgrade. More turbo, more heat = warping. It's also a common problem with the stock manifolds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,407 Posts
You can use a dial indicator and a bore bridge or a magnetic base to get tdc with the head off
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,518 Posts
I've had my exhaust manifold skimmed. Got a couple of them here, old used ones. "some say" that if you have an old warped one, then these are the ones to get skimmed as they've already had the heat treatment and become warped. so unlikely to warp any more.

I also had the webbings ground out between each port on the manifold too.
with the regards to the 10P head, all of what CDN38 said, plus change the 2 dowels in the block/head to steel ones (the later 15P and 16P engines had steel dowels). plastic to hold an engine component in position? crazy!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Getting a new head at the moment is a steep proposition. Especially with 240k km on the truck. I cant justify spending the $1500+ USD at the moment. I rather dump the TD5 and put a big diesel in it to be honest. I took the engine out as an exercise but now I feel like I will just keep the pistons as-is and change the seals to take care of my leaks. I do want to take care of the oil pump bolt. Anyone know where that is?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,250 Posts
With 240k on the engine it shouldn't really need anything other than dealing with any oil leaks. Check your main harness to the ECU and see if there's any oil that has migrated down the harness. If so, replaced the injector harness and seal. (again, common issue on the 10P) If you are considering a stage 3 or 4 upgrade, $1500 on a head is a small amount of insurance to pay to ensure you pull it off. It gets you at very least another 250k km out of the engine if it's all sound. If you're wanting a big diesel, it makes a new head and a stage 3 or 4 tune look like chump change.

Just saw your tother post on towing. Adding it all up, if you have been towing with this rig, and have that kind of mileage, the head has almost certainly already been replaced. You should take a look to see if you can find any casting marks on it that identifies it as AMC. Most likely would be on the exhaust port side, above the center port. Were the locating dowels that are there the you took the head off plastic, or metal?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top