Defender Source Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I am fairly handy in the garage (at least with the help of D Source or a good youtube video) and am planning to install some suspension upgrades on my 90. I am nervous because I have never dealt with springs and I have this vision in my head of one just completely unloading right into my face. Ha! Are my fears valid? Any advice for pulling shocks and springs to install a suspension upgrade? Any advice on a good spring compressor? Any other tools, tips, or tricks?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
This is the rear of my 110, probably the same. About 4" gap with 2" lift springs, so no worry about them flying out. The fronts are touching but no tension on them. A bigger worry is having them fall off on to your foot. That is as long as you have the means to jack it up to full droop. (mines on a 2 post lift). My biggest problem was getting the front radius arm bolts lines up, I think I would bolt them to the axle first then the frame if I was ever to do it again.

Sean
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Shocks are pretty easy but the stems me turn. Some will have a slot for an Allen key to hold the stem from rotating, if not there should be a flat edge you can hold with vice grips.

For the springs I used a engine hoist strapped to the bumper (front), receiver (rear) to lift the truck up to remove the springs. I found it was less sketchy than using coil compressors.

You may want to use some penetration oil on the bolts/nuts on the spring retainers if they are rusty. Otherwise a pretty easy and straightforward job.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,497 Posts
Fronts are the only pita... jack the truck up and put it on jack stands then use the floor jack to drop the axle out from it. Its not that bad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
you don't need a spring compressor. disconnect the shocks drop the axle unbolt spring reverse installation. the front can be tedious but same suggestion applies.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,288 Posts
A spring compressor can be handy, especially if you have long springs. Be careful not to drop too low and damage the brake lines. This is easy to do on the front.

Some of the pictures above are not with stock shocks, so are misleading. Not all springs are the same length, so some of the advice above is misleading.

You want good, solid jack stands under the frame. Old shocks may not come loose and need to be cut off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Yeah Red, I guess you are right my shocks are longer but so are my springs. I got the old stock ones off very easily though. Like I said the front were close but I just used a ratchet strap to pull up the opposite side a couple inches and they fell out.

Sean
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fellas! Thank you so much. This is super helpful and SO appreciated. And @sgo70 that frame is a piece of artwork. Beautiful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Thanks, been a lot of work on this truck. It's funny I didn't even realize until Headdamage came over and pointed out that the frame had been plated top and bottom with 1/8" steel and must have been an armored vehicle in it's past. Came from the desert so no rust either.

Just make sure you are jacked up securely, even on the lift I don't really like the positioning of the arms, too close together because of the curves of the frame.

Good luck,
Sean
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,288 Posts
There are front springs that won't come out without ripping off the brake lines. People do not pay attention and soon they have a non functional truck. Having a set of spring compressors (a $20 purchase at any parts store) will save you. There are rear springs that can't come out at all without spring compressors.

Anyway. My suggestion to any new person doing this. First get the front shocks out. These can be difficult and it is best to get the hard job done first in case it stops you.

Do one side at a time so that one wheel is always on the ground to add an extra layer of safety. Be careful. Don't drop the truck on yourself. In first gear, parking brake on, diff lock engaged. Work on a flat surface.

Front
  • Undo the bottom nut. These can be a pain. Cut if you have a torch and new shocks. If not, heat the nut. Hold the shock body with a pipe wrench and closed end wrench on the nut.
  • Remove the access panels in the wing panels and any engine bay parts that are in the way.
  • Unbolt the front shock towers and then remove the towers with the shocks. Note the bolts may break on the captive bolt plate. It is a good plan to buy new ones in advance. You can get galvanized ones.
  • Get the frame on heavy duty jack stands a few inches higher than normal just behind the radius arm mounts and do both sides.
  • Jack up the axle on one side, preferably with a floor jack. Remove wheel and lower. Be careful not to over extend the brake line. If needed, put on spring compressors or remove brake caliper. Spring compressors are less work.
Rear.
  • Remove shocks. Easiest with an impact.
  • Get the frame on heavy duty jack stands a few inches higher than normal just in front of the trailing arm mounts.
  • Jack up the axle on one side, preferably with a floor jack. Remove wheel and lower. If needed, put on spring compressors.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top