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Discussion Starter #1
So I had to do a spendy top end repair last week after head gaskets let go and blew out the heater core. As part of the process, we took care of a few "while you're in there" type issues. One issue was the very sloppy steering traced to the steering box. Previously, the truck drove fine, tracked fine, just took 1/8 of a turn steering wheel input before getting a direction change, but nice and stable, NO tendency to Death Wobble. Tech "fixed" steering box, tightening the top adjuster Allen bolt/lock nut assy, and input shaft, so there is now zero perceptible play. This left the steering wheel cocked at 30-45deg, so he adjusted drag link to re-center. Problem is, the truck's steering is now scary responsive, "darty" would be the word. Since it's a SW with a heavy roof rack, this translates to some scary feelings at anything above 40-50 mph. Even minor steering inputs send the truck darting left or right and tipping heavily. A panic lane change would roll the truck. So I'm assuming he's some how adjusted either drag link or tie rod such that I have too much toe out? Need to measure, but what am I looking for as far as spec? Neutral? Slight toe in? Slight toe out? If so, how much?

THx
Mikey
 

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1/8" toe out. Just use a taper measurer. Might be a good idea to idea to download the workshop manual...

Tech should not have changed the toe. Would be best to check box adjustment per the manual.

Are you lifted? If so, you may have no castor and that makes things like you describe.
 

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A brand new OME steering damper may help too. Don't buy the bilstein one though. It's pressurized. You'll be making involuntary left turns all day
 

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Should not need a steering damper, they are really only for off road. They mask problems. On the road, it should drive straight and stable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mystery solved I think. Close inspection revealed the track rod has a noticeable bend in it. Somebody was wheeling hard and it took a big hit. So much so that it's been rubbing on the guard attached to the diff for some time. So much that loosening the clamps to adjust forces removal of the diff guard to turn the rod tube itself, the bend is too large to rotate with guard in place. Toe measurement shows the bent track rod is now shortened enough to give something on the order of 5/8"-3/4" toe out, measured from inside face of wheel front and back. I'm guessing 3/4" toe out is pretty excessive given the manual calls for 0 to 2mm. That would explain the "darty" fealing. New track rod and rod ends assy ordered.

Thx Guys.
Mikey
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well waddaya think guys? Could this explain the massive toe-out? Umm....yep. SPO musta done some fairly serious crawling over big stuff to make a hit that hard. My question is how did he NOT notice the change in steering behavior? And the records show it was serviced religiously at Land Rover Alexandria, how did they not see the massive bend in the tie rod, not to mention the raw metal scrape of the rod against the tie rod guide attached to the diff housing? At any rate, rod replaced, toe set to zero, steering back to normal.

Cheers
Mikey
 

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A brand new OME steering damper may help too. Don't buy the bilstein one though. It's pressurized. You'll be making involuntary left turns all day
So not true.
 

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They are very easy to bend. Pretty much any light off roading and you get a bent rod.
 
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