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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So today I removed the pinion flange and oil seal on my Salisbury rear axle (seal was leaking.)
I marked the the pinion and nut and counted the turns.

A number of things kind of concern me though. First off the nut wasn't nearly as hard to get off as I expected.
Secondly I went to use a bearing puller to pull off the flange and I could turn the puller by hand and the flange just slid off.
The splines look fine on both the flange and pinion. It also looked like there was rtv on the spines. Weird.

So the flange needs to be replaced as the seal wore a big groove in it (I kind of expected that and have a replacement). But I'm a bit concerned about putting the new one on and just using the old nut setting due to the mentioned issues.

Do you think I should use a new crush washer and pull the diff out to re-set the resistance in the pinion? Or am over thinking this?
 

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I used a speedy sleeve on mine rather then a new flange. That was 10k + miles ago and no leaks. Easy to reuse that way.
 

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The manual says to mark the nut prior to removing (or using a dial torque wrench, or digi one, in reverse, so you can see how much torque you need to undo the nut,) then just refit using the same torque, thus the crush tube thing doesn't need touching.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The manual says to mark the nut prior to removing (or using a dial torque wrench, or digi one, in reverse, so you can see how much torque you need to undo the nut,) then just refit using the same torque, thus the crush tube thing doesn't need touching.
I do understand that, and everything is marked. I guess I'm just a bit concerned that upon removal both the nut and the flange came off more easily than I had expected. I've read how hard especially the nut is to come off and mine was breeze.
So I'm questioning if it was set up correctly when I took it off, if it wasn't then returning to it's previous position might not be ideal....
 

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You may find on fitting & tightening everything that the pinion will pull up tight like the setting on a wheel bearing and you will find it hard to turn by hand. That problem is stopped by the bearing spacer that collapses while tightening up. Maybe you should fit a new one while you are in there. I know its a drag to pull the Salisbury out and maybe you are lucky and it does not pull up too tight.?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here's a thought. Presuming the crush spacer isn't over cooked I wonder if I could simply tighten the nut up until there was no end float. Using a dial gauge off the pinion end for reference.

Thoughts?
 

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Once you have torqued the crush sleeve to the correct torque and you undo it to fit for instance a new seal on the pinion it is normally difficult to torque back to the correct tightness without pulling the bearings up too tight. I have read of some drivers having a spacer machined instead of fitting the crush sleeve. I have never seen or done this.
Maybe in your case somebody previously had opened the pinion and released the force on the crush sleeve and just screwed it back on again. Keep tightening the flange nut to see how much torque you can get. The nut must be square punched again to stop it coming loose.
 

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Apparently most Dana 60s do not use crush sleeves. I wonder if you can get a normal spacer and shim kit from a Dana 60 to get rid of the crush sleeve? You could pull the sleeve and install a solid spacer and shims measured to the same length.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Apparently most Dana 60s do not use crush sleeves. I wonder if you can get a normal spacer and shim kit from a Dana 60 to get rid of the crush sleeve? You could pull the sleeve and install a solid spacer and shims measured to the same length.
Hmm very interesting idea. The only issue would be if the washer I already have is over crushed it will be very hard to determine what that length would be, without having the diff out, since the resistance is based off bearing pre-load only.

How do they do the set-up on the Dana 60 Pinion bearing pre-load?

------ Follow up post added June 16th, 2015 03:38 PM ------

A follow up thought, perhaps if I used shims I could base the set-up off end float. Interesting
 

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It is resistance based to set bearing preload. You can probably get a reasonable feel for it...

From the manual.
95. Alternately tighten the flange nut and check the drive pinion resistance to rotation until the following figures are achieved, as applicable:
a. Assemblies re-using original pinion bearings: 17.3 to 34.5 kgf cm (15 to 30 Ibf in).
b. Assemblies with new pinion bearings: 34.5 to 46.0 kgf cm (30 to 40 Ibf in).
 

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Measure the resistance while the bearings are loose and then it should increase with bearing preload the amounts above. With the halfshafts out, I would think you could get a decent number being careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Upon some deeper contemplation of the set-up I'm having a hard time grasping what the purpose of the crush sleeve or in the Dana 60 case the shim stack is.
Surely you could apply the proper amount of pressure to the bearings to locate them and get appropriate resistance. Why even have the sleeve? I mean a hub (unless it's td5 or newer) doesn't have a spacer to load the bearings it relies on elimination of end float to get the bearings set properly.
So there must be a reason for the crush tube but what is it? I'm overlooking something here.
 

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It sets the bearing preload. Rover diffs use shims. Hubs use double nuts and lock washers but those don't spin.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It sets the bearing preload. Rover diffs use shims. Hubs use double nuts and lock washers.
Surely you could set the preload without it. Is it just to allow you to crank the nut up to a high tension so it doesn't back off without crushing the bearings? Effectively using tension as the double nut and lock washer?

That would make some sense.
 

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FYI when I did mine - speedi-sleeve (instead of new flange as someone already mentioned), marked the nut position and counted the threads/revolutions to remove, put in new seal, and reassembled - I did not do the crush sleeve. All was fine for many thousands of miles.

That said - it did take my 450ft-lb Snap On impact to get the nut off in the first place. I could not do it with a breaker bar & floor jack on the breaker handle, or with air tools. It was ON there.
 

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On my diff (salisbury) I had to use a 3 ton bottle jack and a 32 socket welded to a 25mm roundbar about a foot long to get that nut to move. Had to jack up the socket against the Landy's weight to get the nut to budge. I found a seal at the engineering supplier , black pvc no metal double lipped with innerspring tensioner measuring 80mm outer & 47mm inner, intended for some or other truck. In $'s it cost $2.00. It fitted well with no leaks to date. Do you really have to buy that weird land rover seal?
 

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my past experience has taught me that if I pull the flange with a crush sleeve behind it, the only way to properly reassemble is by installing a new crush sleeve. other wise you are asking for trouble.
the time and money spent on installing a new sleeve is less than the headache and extra expense on having to replace damaged diff internals due to improper pinion preload because of a used crush sleeve.
 
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