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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, new 1983 110 owner, imported from France. I had a slow leak in one tire and I bought a new one for my spare (which had a 32 year old, or close to it, original). I took it over to Mr. Tire, the worst place on earth, and I'm shown that in fact my tires have tubes! How quaint!

So the questions are A) should i keep the tubes and just find someplace that will patch 'em? B) figure out a grommet/adapter situation so that I can use normal tires on these rims or C) buy new wheels, which I don't REALLY feel like shelling out for just yet.

Pic of my wheels attached and edited a bit to be lighter for wheel identification:



Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The hub cap popped off earlier that day so we sprayed some oil. It's all good now!
 

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You can go tubeless if you want. You just install tubeless valve stems. They come in the size to fit the tube holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Is there any reason to keep them?
 

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Not in my opinion. You may run into tire shops that won't do the work though as they are not tubeless rims. This is mainly due to the lack of the safety bead. The reality is that I've never found a rim with a bead that is harder to break than a stock Land Rover steel wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great! this is all very helpful. So the inevitable question: does anyone know of the proper valve stems for this? All the ones i see seem to be for air pressure modification and internal tire pressure systems.
 

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The rivets in the older rims would sometimes leak air so they used tubes. Over the years I've had no problem running tubeless after getting my riveted rims painted/powder coated.
 

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Great! this is all very helpful. So the inevitable question: does anyone know of the proper valve stems for this? All the ones i see seem to be for air pressure modification and internal tire pressure systems.
You want the 5/8" diameter ones. Any auto parts store, a few bucks for a set. Even if you use a tire installer to supply them, everyone that goes off road should carry a spare or two along with a puncture repair kit.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=208
 

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Hey folks, new 1983 110 owner, imported from France. I had a slow leak in one tire and I bought a new one for my spare (which had a 32 year old, or close to it, original). I took it over to Mr. Tire, the worst place on earth, and I'm shown that in fact my tires have tubes! How quaint!

So the questions are A) should i keep the tubes and just find someplace that will patch 'em? B) figure out a grommet/adapter situation so that I can use normal tires on these rims or C) buy new wheels, which I don't REALLY feel like shelling out for just yet.

Pic of my wheels attached and edited a bit to be lighter for wheel identification:



Thoughts?
This is quite typical of imported defenders, it should be no problem at all for the tire shop to fit tubeless tires, you don't need any 'adapters'. Take it to a used tire place.
 

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You dont need anything. Tire place is just giving you ****. When you are changing out the tires just tell them to give you the tubes so your kid or whoever can use them in the winter. When I changed out my tires they were surprised to see them and asked if I wanted to keep them for myself. This was at a PepBoys place. All my rims are Series types and I have never had a problem changing from tube to tubeless.
 

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So I just recently got new tires and I put them on a set of 1-ton/130 rims that I have no prior experience with. The tire shop is a friend of mine and he insisted that I used tubes. So I did. Should I not have? I went along with it because I had no prior experience with the 1-ton rims and I know they're not designed tubeless. Should I have insisted on running them tubeless even though they're not designed that way?
 

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Carl, I've run those rims without tubes for over 11 years and no problems at all. I've run em down to 14 psi bouncing around rocks and roots and no issues. If you ever get a hole. Plug it, air up, drop pressure to desired and move on.
 

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It is up to you. IME, if you run off road at low pressures, tube failures become fairly common. It does not help that you can't buy quality tubes anymore.

Tubeless are a lot easy to field patch. If you do off road, carry a tubeless stem and at least you can stick it in without removing the tire and plug patch the puncture.
 

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I knew it. I should have insisted on tubeless. I just didn't have experience with them. The rims were in pretty bad shape even though I had them primed and painted so I was a little worried they would leak.
 

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If you were worried about leaking just grab a rattle can of paint and paint over the pieces meet and rivets a few times and that should do it. Been running my tires for years with no problems and I didnt do anything to them. Even run them below 10psi just to get some flex and they just kept going.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Awesome, thanks everybody! Back to Mr. Tire I go (unless any DC,MD,VA folks have a better option.)
 

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Those rims, as said above, do not have a safety flange to catch the bead at low air pressures or cornering forces. It is a safety feature. Lots of people run with out tubes and have never had a problem. But you are taking an additional risk by doing that. At least here in the Sates if you are in an accident and the insurance company finds out that you are not running tubes they may deny the claim. Just saying...
 
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