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UPDATE:
I have been trying to enjoy my Defender after doing my 250 conversion and have done so but have had major issues with my sniper installation. I have narrowed down the issues to the fact my motor is not the healthiest thing out there.
The conversion is excellent without complaint but the sniper was causing me major issues. I installed the original carburetor and adjusted my timing using a vacuum gauge. The truck starts up with a flick of the key even when hot and it is a 100 degrees out, runs like a champ with no issues at all. I am so happy I can call the truck finished now.

If you want to run the engine on the carb and not spend $1500 plus on a holley I say go for it you wont be disappointed.

I have one if these running right now and love it!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #582 ·
Pictures of a RHD install of a 200TDI AC kit onto a Chevy 250 using the brackets and extra pulleys we manufacture.
This required a different fan belt and two custom hoses.
Everything else is stock.
Like the engine, It all bolts right in and makes no changes to the host vehicle.
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Click to enlarge.
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1985 Ninety
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293 Posts
Alternator wiring question...where do they go? The two large brown wires I would assume go to the main lug on the alternator but I am unsure about the yellow wire and the other loose brown wire just happens to be in the loom so I am not sure of it's purpose.....maybe coolant temp? This is a wiring harness from a 1985 90 with the 2.5L NA and the alternator is a Delco 10SI 3 wire version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #584 ·
If you check the wiring diagram in the Land Rover workshop manual, you'll see that the 2 brown wires are (+) and run back to the starter solenoid ring terminal.
The brown with yellow wire is the field wire for the charge warning light.
The Delco 10SI alternator has a lug and a 2 spade plug.
If your 10SI is not self exciting:
The 2 brown wires connect to the lug.
The red wire on the 2 spade plug connects to the lug and the other wire connects to the charge warning light.
 
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1985 Ninety
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Got it! Any idea what the other stand alone brown wire is for, looks like it might be a spare the best I can tell? My shop manual doesn't have a specific wiring diagram for a 1985, only 1986 onwards and the yellow wire didn't show up. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #586 ·
It's not yellow, it's brown with yellow and it will be in your manual.
Regarding the extra brown: brown is (+) not fused, so likely goes to the ring terminal on the starter solenoid, but where was it plugged into originally?
You may have to trace it back to see where it goes if you don't know.
An easy way to trace is to disconnect the (+) battery cable.
With the (+) battery cable off, run a wire from the (+) side of the battery to the extra brown wire and start checking circuits with a test light until you figure out where the other end of this extra brown wire terminates.
 

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1986 Land Rover 90 (currently..) 19j / lt77
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Hello All..
My "rdavisinva" swap is nearly complete ,, just to tidy up wiring / gauge issues ..

CAN ANYONE HELP ME OUT WITH WHAT THREAD TAP I NEED TO FIT THIS ?
(the original temp sending unit) .. i want to keep dash stock as possible.

 

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Discussion Starter · #588 ·
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Can anyone tell me the length of the 250 engine, from the bellhousing mounting face to the front of the crank pulley? Single-belt pulley, preferably, but whichever. I need the actual measurement, not "should be around"....
Have been getting a lot of PMs and emails regarding the Chevy 250 vs the 300TDI conversion in pre 300TDI vehicles and vehicles that left the factory with a 300TDI engine. Owners want to compare the 2 conversions and asked all sorts of questions about the cost and ease of converting one verses the other, performance, maintenance, road noise, and operational costs like mileage and finally reliability. I won't comment on the diesel noise verses a gasoline engine.

I'll try and break these down for you potential buyers who want a to be more informed before you make a decision one way or the other. Will also try and prioritize these in the perceived order of importance.

Ease of conversion:
Assumptions: Owner has a pre 300-TDI engine: 11H, 17H, 10J, 11J, 12J, 19J, 200Tdi and (11L, 12L, 13L and 14L).
Ease or difficulty of converting:

Motor mounts:
Chevy 250: Bolts in (no changes to the host vehicle)
300TDI: Requires cutting the factory mounts off the frame and welding on new 300TDI mounts

Transmission:
Chevy 250: No change, conversion kit has an adapter that bolts directly to the existing short belhousing transmission LT77 or R380 stumpy.
300TDI: Requires changing to the long belhousing R380.

Transfer case:
Chevy 250: Recommended change to the 1.22
300TDI: If you have a D90 or a 200TDI, with a 1.4 no change is required. If you have a 110 with a 1.6, you need to change to a 1.4.

Radiator:
Chevy 250: Can reuse the original radiator for all engines except the 200TDI.
300TDI: requires changing to the 300TDI radiator and frame.

Intercooler and piping:
Chevy 250: Not required.
300TDI: Intercooler and piping is required.

EFI:
Chevy 250: Recommend the Holley Sniper, but not required, a carb will work.
300TDI: Not required.

HEI:
Chevy 250: Stock on all later engines. Recommended but not required on early engines.
300TDI: Not required.

Electric Cooling Fans:
Chevy 250: Recommended. Can be controlled by the Sniper or a simple thermal switch and relay.
300TDI: Not required. Factory fan is commonly fitted.

Alternator:
Chevy 250: For RHD factory mount with Delco 10SI alternator. For LHD, kit includes an alternator mount for the right side of the engine. Block with casting for the mount is required. 10SI alternator is commonly used, but some have fitted higher output versions.
300TDI: Not required.

Power Steering:
Chevy 250: Factory mounts will work with RHD without AC. Custom mount available with conversion kit (RHD with AC or LHD with or without AC), Requires a hydraulic shop to make a custom pressure hose.
300TDI: Not required.

Air Conditioning: This seems to be a big subject lately.
Chevy 250: Factory AC compressor mounts work for compressor mounting. Engine mount available with the kit for the Sanden style compressor. Under dash unit is required. AC systems have been installed using custom AC hoses.
300TDI: Factory style kits available for purchase.

Maintenance & Reliability:
Assumptions: Engine is in good used condition and has been rebuilt or well maintained. Won't go into oil and filter replacement.

Parts Availability:
Chevy 250: Over the counter locally or fast warehouse ordering.
300TDI: Mail order 3 or more day delivery time.

Timing Belt:
Chevy 250: Not required. .Engine has metal timing gears that do not require any maintenance.
300TDI: Must be changed every 60K miles. Requires removing the front cover and other parts to replace.

Fueling: Am not going into the major differences or component cost each have pros and cons. Some owners have a lot of injection pump issues, while other owners have had EFI issues. Personally, I have had more component issues with diesel injection pumps and fuel injectors, but the Holley Sniper EFI can be a challenge if not installed properly.
Chevy 250: EFI or Carb. Gasoline only.
300TDI: Injection pump, fuel injectors. Diesel fuel, SVO, WVO, and other alternate fuel.

Head gasket replacement: This is worth mentioning as 300TDI engines are known to need head gaskets over time while the Chevy 250 is not prone to head gasket failure.

Ignition System:
Chevy 250
: HEI recommended: low interval replacement for cap, rotor, spark plugs, and wires.
300TDI: Not Required.

Glow Plugs:
Chevy 250
: Not Required..
300TDI: Requires glow plug controller and glow plugs. Typically low interval replacement.

Seasonal Thermostat Replacement:
Chevy 250
: Recommended 180F for summer and 190F for winter.
300TDI: Not Required.

General Reliability and Maintenance:
Chevy 250
: Low maintenance and high reliability (after owning both).
300TDI: Much higher maintenance and lower reliability (after owning both seemed like I was always doing some maintenance to our TDI powered vehicles, like fuel leaks for example on those hard plastic lines, draining water out of the sedimenter, and so on).

Performance: Based on stock performance without any smog or EGR. I won't go into acceleration times and the time needed for the turbo to spool up, difference in noise, and overall drivability. Performance parts are available for both options.
Chevy 250 (removable manifold version):
Displacement: 4.1 liters
HP: 155 HP (115.58 kW)
Torque: 235 LB-FT
Gas Mileage: 13-22 MPG
300TDI:
Displacement: 2.5 liters
HP: 111 HP
Torque: 195 lb.ft (82.77kW)
Diesel Mileage: 20-25 MPG

Cost: This is a subject that varies a great deal, but the costs are generalized below.
Chevy 250: A used engine of unknown condition can typically be acquired for a few hundred dollars.
Remanufactured Chevy 250 engines are available in the $1,500 range for a long block, but a donor engine is still required for the sheet metal and all the bolt on brackets and manifolds.
A new Holley Sniper EFI is about $1,200.
Electric fans can cost several hundred dollars.
A 1.2 transfer case is about $300 to $1,200 depending on condition.
Conversion kits currently start at $1,799 and go up to $2,999 for LHD with AC.
No changes are made to the host vehicle because the Chevy 250 bolts into a Defender.
If the host vehicle were diesel, a new fuel tank is recommended which could cost about $200 to $400.

300TDI: A used engine of unknown condition can typically be acquired for a few thousand dollars.
Remanufactured 300TDI engines can be purchased for $4 - 5K.
An injection pump is about $1,200 or so if needed.
Injectors are about $350 to $700 a set, if needed.
A long belhousing R380 can be as low as $500 or as much as $1,800 depending on condition.
Obtaining a radiator frame, radiator, intercooler, and hoses can cost as much as $1,000 or be much less if used.
Obtaining all the air filter, mounts, and hoses can be expensive, but you can do your own research here.
Replacing the turbo can be expensive, but you can do your own research here.
Cutting off the old frame mounts and welding on new frame mounts can be expensive, but you can do your own research here. If the mounts are not in the correct location, then the mechanical fan won't fit in the fan shroud and other problems arise.

I hope this helps!
Very helpful Robert. Do you have a website to order the 250 conversion kit from? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #591 ·
No, but can PM you.
 

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I did Roberts conversion I had a tough time finding some one to do it ( wanted the conversion but could not do it myself time constraints) I found someone who finally did the work
*I used roberts motor mounts well constructed and the conversion kit
I got rid of the Lt 77 and got the R380 stumpy (highly recommended spending the extra money on the higher 5th gear from Ashcroft) I drive it about 1000 miles a month lots of highway I get 16.5 mpg (I probably would get a bit more mpg)and replaced the transfer case to the lt1.22
the timing system is a chain. The fueling I choose the edelbrock Asv2 500cfm 450 bucks works great no hassles and regular gas
I choose a HEI distrib I redid the heads larger valves and lumped the ports shorty headers to a dual exhaust and bumped HP to around 285-290 ( kinda guessing conservatively) it has a great sound.
I used the revotech cooling fans (dual) they have been a god send at keeping the engine literally around 160 degrees on our hot North Carolina summer days expensive but worth it. There is a lot heat that gets into the cab still. I thought I nailed that with different insulations.but that’s a work in progress ( any suggestions would help).
overall Roberts kit and knowledge is worth it. I wasn’t looking for a v8 although his kits can work with a Chevy small Block V8 based on what the tech that did my conversion told me. it will bolt right up to roberts kit just make new motors mounts and change location..good luck you wont be disappointed
 

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1988 90 2.5L Petrol Converted to Chevy 250 4.1L w/ A/C
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I installed a 180F thermostat and my chevy 250 is running a bit warm (the stock water temp gauge in the dashboard hovers right at the red limit) and a laser thermometer on the thermostat housing reads around 200F at normal running temperature. Anybody else running a 180F thermostat and if so what temps are you seeing? Is anyone running a 160F thremostat and how does that work? I live in MS, it's HOT here this time of year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #595 ·
A guy in St Louis has AC and at 70 - 75 MPH had climbing temperature.
He installed the thickest Griffin Aluminum Radiator Available in the series that had the:
1-55241-X part number
Also used the fans:
KMS-2541, PF-09C X 2,
and KM-84 Radiator Cap
He had to have a machine shop make 4 mounting blocks and modify the upper radiator mounts.
The overheating problems are now solved.
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Click to enlarge
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1988 90 2.5L Petrol Converted to Chevy 250 4.1L w/ A/C
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Yeah Red, that's kind of what I was thinking. Thank you too Robert. I'm running AC with the stock 2.5L Petrol radiator, and the dual revotech electric fan setup. The fans cut in at the appropriate time but the temp still hovers in the low red region on my stock gauge.

Robert - I'm curious, do you find that your 250 setups are usually ok with the stock radiator in place? I really don't want to put in a bigger radiator...
 

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Discussion Starter · #597 · (Edited)
The stock radiators are often old and not capable of optimal capacity.
I have a new V8 radiator and have AC.
When over 95 deg F outside, have had to slow down with the AC on because the temperature was climbing.

The new extra wide Griffin radiator is up to the task according to the guy in post 595.
Just ordered one today along with the dual cooling fan assembly.
Another advantage of on-line collaboration.
 
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Yeah Red, that's kind of what I was thinking. Thank you too Robert. I'm running AC with the stock 2.5L Petrol radiator, and the dual revotech electric fan setup. The fans cut in at the appropriate time but the temp still hovers in the low red region on my stock gauge.
I would also look at changing fans. Most aftermarket fans like Revotec are really inefficient and are nowhere near the air flow performance as OEM electric fans. If there is the clearance, the "Taurus" fan is always a good choice. These are successfully used is much higher horsepower applications. With all fans, make sure they are properly shrouded (to move air past all of the tubes) and sealed to the radiator (to avoid air bypass).
 

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I have the defender in post 595. I think the other issue I was having with temp creeping up on highway was the temp sensor is not all the way in the coolant. It's screwed into an adapter and the temp. sensor screws into adapter making temp sensor sit higher up picking up surrounding heat. I put some header wrap on sensor and temp seem to be more inline with the 160 thermo stat. Driving around town temp is 175-190 with dual fans running with a/c on. Highway cruising 70-75 190-200 sometime 205. Still needing to take a long highway drive and monitor it. When the temp sensor was in the head right next to exhaust manifold temp senor was got up to 235, that's when I decided to move to thermostat housing. I think 205 is fine if stays at 205.

12bolt.com has upper and lower housing if needed.
Thermostat Housing Upper Lower New 194 230 250 292 (12bolt.com)
 

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I wanted to share this company if you are having using the holley EFI and having issues. I am using the sniper on another car and they helped get the tune dialed in. When I got my defender I didn't like how, I had to leave key on and excessive cranking after fuel prime. I emailed the config. file and couple datalogs and for couple hundred bucks they dialed it right in. They adjusted the fuel prime and cranking fuel and now fires right up. They also said, the efi unit is tracking and monitoring very well after viewing the datalogs.
EFI System Pro - Your One-Stop Source for Fuel Injection Systems and Information
 
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