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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those who asked this is what I learned from my first galvanization run.

I started with 80 individual items: new, used, rusty, painted, power coated, fully prepped, and older galvanized pieces. Basically anything steel that was on or going on my truck was dipped. The place I took my parts was able to chemically strip the pieces (for a fee) so other than a few random items, nothing was prepped by me.

This is what I learned.
Fully prepped/raw steel items yield the best result. When I repaired the door frames I cleaned all the steel with maroon scotchbrite pads on the grinder. These frames came our really nice. I’ve very happy with the results. I also had a few raw steel items that came out the same. Pieces look fantastic.

Re-dipping older galvanized pieces also came out very well. Particularly if they were clean (ie no adhesive/glues/etc).

New/used steel with paint or primer with seams came out well but would have been better had I sent them off for blasting first (I think???). The painted pieces needed to stay in the acid wash longer to strip the paint. There are some areas around seams where the acid collected and formed gritty paste after galvanizing. Not a big deal and they removed this paste and treated with cold galvanization afterwards. I don’t know if the buildup is from the paint and added time in the acid wash or if it would do this anywhere with seams.

Rusty items faired the worse. I brought in some really bad items and the acid etched all the rust away (created holes in some items) and the finish has dimples from all the material that was removed. In some places of heavy rust there was that paste that was found in the seams.

In doing this again I would probably remove the scaling rust before the acid wash and grind the surface flat to avoid the dimpling. Some items warped but I don’t think it’s going to be a big deal. I should be able to straighten most of it out with minimal effort.

I was surprise how cost effective galvanizing is. The place I went too charged by the lbs with a minimum order that I didn’t reach.

For the NOVA guys I used Commonwealth Galvanization in Ashland, VA. 100 miles south on 95. Ask for Steve Cavanah, he’s a first class gentleman. Thank you Uncle Doug for the referral!

Back to chasing threads and removing excess zinc…
 

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Paul can you share pictures of the worst of this paste issue you describe? Your results sound pretty consistent with my first galvy experience but i would like to make sure I'll be as happy with commonwealths stripping. The place I used did the stripping in galvy and so far all the stuff that didn't look good turned out to be extra clumps if zinc they skim off the top as they pull the parts, and not a lack of stripping completely.
 

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My experience has been that the acid will eat any and all rust. If metal is rusted enough to be pitted sanding the surface smooth before the acid bath doesn't eliminate rust pitting you describe. The only way to get away from the pitting is buy new metal.
Sounds like you had a good experience as well. I told Steve I would spread the word since they are a small operation who are intentionally specializing in small jobs like what we bring them. There is a large corporately owned galvanizing company a mile away that treats small 1 time customers like us like step children.
 

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JEEZ ... I THOUGHT I loved my Defenders clearly I just lust after them... I am shamed now. That is all. ;-)
 

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I don't think I saw in your other thread, but did you remove the bulkhead vent mesh before you galvanized? If not, that may be another lesson soon to come! :)
 

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Paul your experience is typical. Not saying anything against these guys but they don't have a lot of Harvard grads applying to work the cauldrons of molten zinc if you know what I mean.
They're used to dipping power poles, bridge parts, etc and not car parts. You have to expect the good along with the bad.
For the globs of zinc, just melt them off with a MAPP torch. Use a air blow gun to clear out threads and stuff, and be sure to wear eye protection whenever you are air blasting molten zinc. Do not grind or sand or file away at the zinc, you'll end up going too deep and exposing steel.
 

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Paul your experience is typical. Not saying anything against these guys but they don't have a lot of Harvard grads applying to work the cauldrons of molten zinc if you know what I mean.
They're used to dipping power poles, bridge parts, etc and not car parts. You have to expect the good along with the bad.
For the globs of zinc, just melt them off with a MAPP torch. Use a air blow gun to clear out threads and stuff, and be sure to wear eye protection whenever you are air blasting molten zinc. Do not grind or sand or file away at the zinc, you'll end up going too deep and exposing steel.
My old IIA chassis and bulkhead were dipped and sat in my yard for a couple of years before I assembled the truck. Twelve years later both were a good as new (sans cracks in the chassis from offroading). Heavy deposits in nooks and crannies is of no harm. when running taps and dies you'll expose steel no matter. This also happens when you clear out the bushing holes in Series chassis'. As zinc oxidizes it will 'weep' over exposed steel to reduce rust. The orange will still be there but it won't rot like typical exposed steel. A good zinc or copper based anti-seize is recommended for future service. I'm following Doug's lead and looking to get my CDN M101 galvanized after sandblasting it clean and then a good camo paint job.
 

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My old IIA chassis and bulkhead were dipped and sat in my yard for a couple of years before I assembled the truck. Twelve years later both were a good as new (sans cracks in the chassis from offroading). Heavy deposits in nooks and crannies is of no harm. when running taps and dies you'll expose steel no matter. This also happens when you clear out the bushing holes in Series chassis'. As zinc oxidizes it will 'weep' over exposed steel to reduce rust. The orange will still be there but it won't rot like typical exposed steel. A good zinc or copper based anti-seize is recommended for future service. I'm following Doug's lead and looking to get my CDN M101 galvanized after sandblasting it clean and then a good camo paint job.
Not sure how anyone could consider excess zinc a bad thing....

I say leave is bare galv Mark why have yours look like everyone elses m101 ?
 

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I have also noticed that the thinner the steal the better the galv looks. Like the inner wheel wells. They always come out great and look like chrome at first.
I have done some really thick steal parts and they come out good but dull
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Paul can you share pictures of the worst of this paste issue you describe? Your results sound pretty consistent with my first galvy experience but i would like to make sure I'll be as happy with commonwealths stripping. The place I used did the stripping in galvy and so far all the stuff that didn't look good turned out to be extra clumps if zinc they skim off the top as they pull the parts, and not a lack of stripping completely.
I'm traveling most of the week but I'll take some pics when I get back.

Also, I want to be clear that I am extremely satisfied in the job they did. When I do the 110 I will most definitely use them again.

------ Follow up post added February 24th, 2014 04:50 PM ------

I don't think I saw in your other thread, but did you remove the bulkhead vent mesh before you galvanized? If not, that may be another lesson soon to come! :)
I didn't remove the mesh. Will try heating it up and hitting with compressed air this weekend
 

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I'm traveling most of the week but I'll take some pics when I get back.

Also, I want to be clear that I am extremely satisfied in the job they did. When I do the 110 I will most definitely use them again.

------ Follow up post added February 24th, 2014 04:50 PM ------



I didn't remove the mesh. Will try heating it up and hitting with compressed air this weekend
Josh can come and individually drill out the holes in the mesh like he did on JimC's truck
 

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Anything made of steel. Some people go nuts and galvanize everything.
 
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Will be going to galvanize soon with some luck....do you know of any examples where people have posted a complete list with photos?
Pretty long list. Big ones are the bulkhead, side frames, seatbox (parts of) door frames, rear seat crossmembers, seatbelt anchors, body capping. Really depends on how far you want to go, how far you plan on pulling your rig apart.
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