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Discussion Starter #1
200TDi has been sitting a few months now. Started right up and ran fine, idles etc. Wanted to drive it down to my dads garage to start doing some work on it, pulled out from my culdesac and it went from running fine to stalling out. Shut it off and wait awhile and it would restart and run fine for a little while, then stalling and barely running continues. Shut it off and leave it a little while and then it likely starts up fine and runs normal, but shortly after giving it some fuel demand it starts to stall out.

I’m thinking this feels like fuel starvation, maybe something grew in the tank or the filter when it was sitting awhile, or the paper filter got some water on it.

So I tried the primer handle and it felt like it has zero resistance to it, butI also see comments that the primer pump won’t have resistance unless the cam lobe has engaged it?

I have a filter here and that’s easy enough to get swapped in.

How can I test the Lift pump? Turn it to when the lobe engages and then use the lever? When I feel resistance I ought to be able to get fuel to pump out at the connection to the IP right?
 

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You're on the right track. Replace the fuel filter then rotate the engine until you feel a little bit of resistance on the fuel pump lever. When pumping on the liver you should get spurts of fuel at the injection pump banjo bolt inlet if it's loose or disconnected. You could also just get a friend to try and crank the motor over with the fuel line disconnected from the injection pump. Also disconnect the wire from the fuel stop solenoid on the injection pump.

run the output of the pump into a bucket and while you're cranking you should have a solid flow of fuel if you don't you need a lift pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the clarification on the priming behavior!

Well I replaced the fuel filter with one of my Jeep ones, it’s just bigger and like many things in life bigger is better, right?

no changes, though it did almost look like there was biological growth on the inlet side, but dumping out the fuel into into a clean bucket showed clear fuel, and surprisingly large amount of debris, paint flakes from the fuel filler, and some large black flakes that I don’t know the origin. I expected a strainer in the tank so seeing the large flakes is disconcerting. Is there an in tank strainer or just a pickup tube?

I ended up blowing backwards through the inlet hose and then reconnecting for test, but during reconnection I found the inlet fitting pipe was a little loose, I was able to turn it about a full turn.

so I changed more than one thing at once. I think it want to drop the tank and check it out, at one point when the tank was very full and I parked on a slight incline I had some diesel leak out, so I have something else going on there. I think it’s a good time to do that maintenance/repair.
I also do not have a sedimenter anymore, so I might think about reviving that bit of hardware. I’m also a big fan of electric lift pumps at the tank to push fuel forward, having the lines under a vacuum is a great way to suck in air, I’d rather see a little bit of diesel oil building up dirt around a fitting or hose vs an unknown amount and location of air entering the system.

I also scored a new Jeep heater/filter head, I think I’ll end up switching to it for my parts commonality.
 

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If you have chunks coming out at the what would be the input for the injection pump You're going to need to flush the entire system.

There's no way to tell if you have a prefilter in the tank. The original fuel pickup on early trucks did not have one but since we don't know if your truck's been converted or not from gasoline or what that has physically in the tank there's no way to tell.

You're going to need to pull your injectors and clean them as well

You should have a pre-filter or sedimenter then a final filter. 8 micron is the stock Land Rover size for the final filter so anything better than or equal to that is good.
 

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If you got growth in the system then drain the tank and clean it out along with the lines. Make-shift some lines from the pick-up pump and filter to a gallon of ATF and fire it up and let it run until it's almost empty then hook everything back up as normal...change the filter. This will purge all the funk out of the engine side of the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Luckily the debris and possibly detritus was not at the IP inlet, but rather the fuel filter. So it appears to have done its job there.
My 110 is an 85, but it’s been frankenrovered with many parts from a 92ish. Bulkhead is a 92, and my engine is a disco 200TDi with all the defender bits on it. It did start life as a diesel though. Interestingly enough my rockers seat box etc all seem to be original and in pretty good shape. But who knows what all has been switched around at this point right?

Anyways, ok so may or may not be a pickup screen in the tank. So at this point I still think it makes it a good idea to drop tank, inspect, clean and reseal as needed.

I’ll report what tank findings are and anything of note.
 
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