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Discussion Starter #1
So im at my whits end with this defender. a little backround, the coustomer brought us this car and I rebuilt the engine and we put an all new ignition system in with a proline distributor. the first one went out on me n we had to put in a new one. I think its because the ignition module is mounted on the distributor and is just getting to hot. the last distributor worked for a whyle then he was driving it on the highway and poped out of high gear. he pulled off the side of the road to put it back in n couldn't get it started again. the ignition module went out again. now we have another new one. im getting spark and it reaks of fuel and I haven't ben able to start it for the last few days. I left the plugs out overnight and It still wont start. im about to go get a compression tester but I don't think that's the problem I think the fuel bowls are flooded or something but there isn't much info for this engine. I don't know how to adjust the fuel level in the bowls. its a twin carb v8. I honestly think im about to loose my job because of this and I have no idea what else to do. please I need help im going crazy.
 

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I wouldnt spend too much time or money on those carbs. Get the edelbrock intake manifold for a buick 215 and drop an Edelbrock 1406 carb.. Better performance and reliability.
 

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While John has good advice, I understand its not your truck and your job might be on the line. Have you checked to see if the diaphragms in the carbs are ok ? Is there oil in the pots on the carbs ? The diaphragm is meant to react to the increased vacuum and increase fueling. The oil in the pot is meant to offer resistance to the rising diaphragm. The diaphragms are pretty easy to blow out if the truck backfires through the intake.
 

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You can set the float level with a 3/8" drive extension lying across the top of the bowl when it's upside down.
If you have the older style brass needle and seat toss them and replace with ones that have a viton tipped needle.
Moss Motors use to have something called a GROSE-JET which is even better still.

You probably have 2 separate issues.
The distributor issue which is a crummy design to begin with and the floats overflowing fuel into the manifold.
Be careful because if you crank it and fill the exhaust with gasoline fumes and get a strong spark to a cylinder, it could ignite the works, blow up the exhaust - the muffler will explode and rip apart at the seams.

This is probably the last thing you want to hear, but the only thing we do with a Rover V8 when it gives trouble is hook an engine hoist to it and pull it out of the vehicle to make room for a diesel.
 

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Personally I think the twin carb design is ludicrous. They took a proven american engine and trashed the proven 4bbl intake and went to the convoluted twin carb setup and a Lucas distributor for decreased economy and performance.
 

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I get Dougs point but If the guy has already paid to have the entire motor rebuilt its worth the noticeable improvement in performance to go to a 4bbl.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well we probably will switch to a 4 barrel but im stuck with what I got right now. I checked the diaphrams and there ok. I drained all the fuel that was in both small tubes I hope that's a good thing cuz they were almost full. I don't really understand how to adj. the fuel bowls I am gonna need some pictures to figure that out I don't understand what u were talking about a 3/8 upsidedown or whatever to adjust fuel bowl but I cant see how to do that im sorry I don't have any experience with these.
 

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well we probably will switch to a 4 barrel but im stuck with what I got right now. I checked the diaphrams and there ok. I drained all the fuel that was in both small tubes I hope that's a good thing cuz they were almost full. I don't really understand how to adj. the fuel bowls I am gonna need some pictures to figure that out I don't understand what u were talking about a 3/8 upsidedown or whatever to adjust fuel bowl but I cant see how to do that im sorry I don't have any experience with these.
You can google how to set the float level on a Stromberg or we can schedule a quick call.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
having the name of the carb definitely helps. im gonna go mess with it somemore if I get stuck again I might need to call u. thank you so much ill keep u posted.
 

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Hey guys, i have an 1983 v8 w/ the twin carb setup and when it runs, it runs great. Hard to tell if it's down on power after all these years, but I can get her up to 75 or 80 on the highway.

That said, the carbs have been giving me a bit of hell.

On cold starts, i have to give it a lot of love, a balance of choke, usually a few failed attempts, and then like 25% of the time, i'm well on my way to flooding it, so I'm turning it over with the pedal floored to give it the air it needs.

the last couple of times i've taken the truck out, it's started fine, then died about half a mile in. It seems to behave like it's flooded. I give it 30-45 minutes with a few failed attempts mixed in, and eventually it'll go again. Sometimes dying again, sometimes not.

Then, i had a situation this weekend where it did the same die-10-minutes-in situation, got it going, i drove it around all day. numerous stops, ran fine, then randomly cut out on me at a stoplight. After a bit I got it started, but then it would only hold idle while I wasn't moving. As soon as I tried to drive, if I let it go back to an idle it would die. I had to get it the mile home through numerous intersections, keeping the revs up the entire time.

Does this sound like a carb tuning issue? And is this something I should fiddle with when I've got no experience or just take it into a shop?
 

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Hey guys, i have an 1983 v8 w/ the twin carb setup and when it runs, it runs great. Hard to tell if it's down on power after all these years, but I can get her up to 75 or 80 on the highway. That said, the carbs have been giving me a bit of hell. On cold starts, i have to give it a lot of love, a balance of choke, usually a few failed attempts, and then like 25% of the time, i'm well on my way to flooding it, so I'm turning it over with the pedal floored to give it the air it needs. the last couple of times i've taken the truck out, it's started fine, then died about half a mile in. It seems to behave like it's flooded. I give it 30-45 minutes with a few failed attempts mixed in, and eventually it'll go again. Sometimes dying again, sometimes not. Then, i had a situation this weekend where it did the same die-10-minutes-in situation, got it going, i drove it around all day. numerous stops, ran fine, then randomly cut out on me at a stoplight. After a bit I got it started, but then it would only hold idle while I wasn't moving. As soon as I tried to drive, if I let it go back to an idle it would die. I had to get it the mile home through numerous intersections, keeping the revs up the entire time. Does this sound like a carb tuning issue? And is this something I should fiddle with when I've got no experience or just take it into a shop?
Have you checked the fluid levels in the pots? I've used miracle oil and it seemed to help. Once tuned and dialed in they actually run well, but still **** compared to a Holley.
 

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Fluid in the pots controls how quickly the richness changes on acceleration.

when dealing with 32 year old carburators you need some diagnostic abilities. Sound like you may be better off finding a decent shop to tune it up
 

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Wow lots of dashpot hate here. Actually, I think they are pretty good carbs when they are tuned properly. You do need an air flow gauge to do it right as both pots have to be in perfect sync. I can understand why Rover went with these. They are good solid reliable carbs that don't have all the stupid Holley issues and were widely used on lots of European cars in those days. The air cleaner plumbing is a marvel of Rube Goldberg more-is-more engineering.
Anyway, I always used ATF in the dashpots. There are as many opinions on what to use as there are tuners, so as long as you aren't using 90wt you're prolly OK. Also be sure the needle is SUPER CLEAN and has no gum or varnish on it. I also found that a spritz of silicone inside the dashpot helped the piston go up and down.
Doug it would seem they are using an electronic diz if they are using up ignition modules.
The heat thing is an old wives tale. These things can take way more heat than the engine can possibly put out.
 
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