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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought the "all new spiffy and cool" brake kit from Atlantic British a few days ago (vented and drilled rotors....kevlar pads) but wasn't able to begin putting the parts in until tonight. I used to have a series truck and adjusting the wheel bearings wasn't hard...I did it by feel and it worked well. I guess that doesn't work well on the 90. I torqued down the hub nut quite tightly...backed it off slightly..and called it done. However...after driving the truck for just a couple of miles I heard the sound of loose wheel bearings...in fact...when I stopped I almost thought I should call a tow truck they were so loose. So the question is....how best to adjust the bearings....(with driveway tools...I do have the hubnut socket even though a chisel and hammer worked fine on the old series truck) since the wheels have to be off..unlike the series truck if I remember right...wiggling the wheel won't work when it is on the ground and you are sitting on it.
 

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Wow, you're freaking me out! ;) I just bought the dba cross-drilled/vented from Expedition Exchange and am about to install. Do I have to take the bleeding bearings apart to replace the rotor?

Yikes!
 

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Kevlar pads - what about those...I heard everything will squeak except for Genuine pads.

?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Yes...you have to disassemble the entire hub. Land Rover apparently didn't want to redesign the whole drive-train when adding the discs so they decided to bolt them to the back of the old style hub plate...which you have to remove to swap rotors. That means bearings...axle, drive flange and everything has to come out...which sucks. The good news..is the kevlar pads are made of a harder material than any others...and when they heat up they really stop, great if you already have larger tires. The slotted rotors "whiz" a bit at speed...but the pads do not make any brake dust....or squeak one single bit!......yet.

scot
 

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I think I'll try the Kevlar pads. Thanks for the tip.

How long of a job was it to install the front rotors? And I wonder if it is a pretty obvious process or is there something I can screw up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would allow an hour for each wheel. In a stroke of luck...the front wheels are a little easier than the back...only because the stub axle stays inside the hub....it is all pretty obvious..the pads couldn't be simpler...getting the rotor off is the only hard part...but boy do the heft pads and drilled and slotted rotors stop!
 

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That's reassuring. ;)

What was the fix on the bearing torque?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hmmm...there is an exact answer for this...but lacking that tool...tighten them down as tight as you can..and then back them off a little before settling on a middle ground...it is a trial and error dillyo
 

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Scott are you talking about the 2 big Nuts. I did the rear a few months back and I bought the tool for tourking those big nuts down. I got it from Rovers North or if you want I'm in Manchester NH so I could let you borrow mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have the hubnut tool too...and I also got it from Rovers North years ago for my series truck. Same tool works on the D-90. Before I got the tool for my series truck...I just used a hammer and chisel on the nuts...which..while not pretty, worked fine. BTW, I get wet too...as my truck still doesn't have the top on...I don't usually put it on until the end of November.
 

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Wicks

I'm not 100% positive, but I think that DBA specifically states that you must use kevlar pads with thier rotors. You might want to double check with them, EE, or GBR.

DJ
 

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I ordered kevlar pads for the dba rotors from Atlantic British. But I am leaving the standard rotors on the rear, and so am using Genuine pads on the rear. Sound OK?

Also will I need this special hub nut tool?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Alan Elliot at www.citysidegarage.com sez they use the stock pads on the super rotors they sell at Atlantic British with no problems...some people dislike the kevlar ones...because they actually don't stop as well as stock until they heat up...but this isn't a problem because they heat up very quickly. And once they do...boy do they STOP. As to the hubnut tool...you don't really need it...you really can use a chisel and hammer to tap the things on or off because the nuts don't have to be too tight and after all, is full of grease. However, the tool is cheap ($20 i think?) and works well. If you do use a chisel, make sure you don't chip off any bits of the nut and leave them in the grease.
 

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There is a similar tool that comes in the factory tool case, doesnt seem like its a 52mm socket though.
 

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I love these kind of designs. Hell back in the day they were the norm. Also love the fact that you can spend another $200 on parts when you do a complete pad/rotor job and end up with 4 completely rebuilt and resealed hubs.

My biggest pet peeve is the tendency for the small inner stub axle seals to fail and leak gear oil into the hubs. I rebuilt all of mine and put new seals everywhere about two weeks ago, then this weekend had to pull the rear shafts and sure enough on both sides my pretty new (rebuilt) hubs with all new parts and pretty red grease were full of stinking 90wt. Apparantly it has something to do with the diameter of the GBR rear shafts... I wonder if the same thing happened up front too. :(
 

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To get a good torque on the hub nuts you need to tighten them down while rotating the hub. The bearings will settle in to place more after it rotates and if you just put them in, torque and go, they will be too loose. I actually also push in and pull out on the hub as well. There is an end-float spec for the hubs, but it's much less that on a series rover. On my coilers I set them by feel because I don't have a dial indicator that goes that low, something like 0.0 - 0.0001". So I just set them to the smallest amount of end-float I can detect by hand.
 

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crown14 said:
My biggest pet peeve is the tendency for the small inner stub axle seals to fail and leak gear oil into the hubs. :(
This is actually the way the hub was designed, the axle seal were added later. fwiw I knock out all of my inner seals and prefer to run the hubs "wet" like a regular truck (from a Series 1 to that Kenworth you saw this morning), the bearings will last longer and run cooler.
The hub seal that works best of this is the RTC3511. I even do it on the front, cv's last longer, no leaks.
If you are going to attemp this you still need to put some grease on the bearings and be sure to keep your diff full.
 

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I can't find it now, but Bill Burke had a good article on reseating the hub seals with a 3" threaded pvc end cap. I have used this method and it works well. The article also talks about seating the hub nuts, basically tighten until you can't turn the rotor, then slightly back it off a touch to allow the rotor to barely be spun by hand.

Also, the rover hub nut tool blows. Get yourself a true 2 1/16" socket so you can use a breaker bar.
 

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pretty good article

http://www.bb4wa.com/articles/wheelbearings.htm

can't imagine needing a breaker bar on the wheel bearing nuts. haven't had any problems with the "tommy bar" approach.

anyway some of the hub nut tools have a spot for a 1/2" or 3/4" drive breaker bar or ratchet.

dmarchand said:
I can't find it now, but Bill Burke had a good article on reseating the hub seals with a 3" threaded pvc end cap. I have used this method and it works well. The article also talks about seating the hub nuts, basically tighten until you can't turn the rotor, then slightly back it off a touch to allow the rotor to barely be spun by hand.

Also, the rover hub nut tool blows. Get yourself a true 2 1/16" socket so you can use a breaker bar.
 
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