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My mechanic buddy and I are replacing my master and slave cylinders this weekend. He is an experienced mechanic but is there anything Rover specific we should know? Probably straight forward...
Thanks
 

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Assuming you're replacing the ones on the NAS, you shouldn't have any issues just be careful of damaging old brittle lines and stripped fittings.


I had some issues fitting a slave and master to an ROW truck years back because the fittings were different (NPT vs. I forget), but that was the only hangup. Just verify that the lines and the fittings play nice before ripping it all apart, or at least have some spare fittings and lines available should things go sideways.
 

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Thanks. Yes NAS and Atlantic British parts.
 

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My mechanic buddy and I are replacing my master and slave cylinders this weekend. He is an experienced mechanic but is there anything Rover specific we should know? Probably straight forward...
Thanks
Yes and No. A quick search will pull many threads on the topic. Because the original design is RHD adapted to LHD, the clutch master is REALLY wedged into the corner. Some have cut the floor to make it easier for the pedal to pass through, some have even cut access holes in their wings to change it (don't recommend either).

Best advice is to take the hood off. Unbolt the Brake Master/pedal box assembly to give you a little room to 'move' it and the brake lines aside, and then start the twisting game till you get the 'angle of the bedangle' just right and you can pull the clutch master and pedal box out as one unit. Then change the master out of the truck, and re-assemble..


Here is one to get you started..

http://www.defendersource.com/forum/f6/clutch-master-cylinder-replacement-5401.html
 

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Yeah, the LHD trucks are much more of a PITA than RHD trucks to get to the Master Cylinder.
A RHD Master Cylinder can be swapped out in 45 minutes (ask Gliderking on here- haha)


Also, I don't know if NAS bellhousings are the same, but be careful not to drop anything inside the bellhousing when removing the slave (i.e. the plastic retaining clip to the pushrod).
 

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Yes and No. A quick search will pull many threads on the topic. Because the original design is RHD adapted to LHD, the clutch master is REALLY wedged into the corner. Some have cut the floor to make it easier for the pedal to pass through, some have even cut access holes in their wings to change it (don't recommend either).

Best advice is to take the hood off. Unbolt the Brake Master/pedal box assembly to give you a little room to 'move' it and the brake lines aside, and then start the twisting game till you get the 'angle of the bedangle' just right and you can pull the clutch master and pedal box out as one unit. Then change the master out of the truck, and re-assemble..


Here is one to get you started..

http://www.defendersource.com/forum/f6/clutch-master-cylinder-replacement-5401.html
^ nailed it above. Once you undo the brake master bolts you can nudge it out of the way and slip the clutch pedal housing out. Be VERY careful not to spill any DOT4 anywhere (for obvious paint reasons).

The only monkey wrench I'll throw out there, is after doing my clutch master a couple of times (as the aluminum cylinder internals tends to degrade rather quickly in my opinion and cause issues). Anyhow, there are two options to avoid this:
1) have your master cylinder brass "sleeved".
2) do a conversion of the master cylinder to a cast iron Dorman*

I chose the latter this summer when I did mine (again), and so far have been thrilled with the results. It was a relatively inexpensive conversion, though it did require having a hydraulic line place make up a custom line to run from the master to the junction above the slave (I had them do it out of stainless so running the new line was a breeze).

Anyhow, if you want any info on the cast iron Dorman conversion send me an email and I can give you the specifics. It's just that I finally got fed up with doing this job multiple times...and generally anytime I look into a Rover clutch reservoir I can see the fluid turning dark/black (or even silver!) which is a dig that the aluminum master is eating itself slowly and contaminating the fluid.

Anyhow, thousands of miles on the Dorman so far and fluid still looks great!

*special thanks to JSBriggs for nudging me towards the Dorman conversion :).
 

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If he loosens the brake MC the clutch MC can be wiggled out without having to remove the wing. If not he may be tempted to cut the bulkhead a bit to get the pedal to clear it. Don't let him cut it!!!!!
 

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As suggested above, if you unbolt the entire brake master petal assembly (leave the lines connected to the brake master), you can move it enough to get the entire clutch petal assembly removed and out of it's location.
Once out, you can swap the clutch master and then put it back in.
Be sure and prime the clutch master with a small amount of fluid.
Be careful because it will squirt the fluid out the line fitting hole with great force.

We have a pair if 1/2" open end wrenches that have been ground down so they fit the clutch adjustment nuts and a pair of needle nose vice grips I use to lock the shaft.
Use a length of wood to extend the clutch petal once the new master is installed and the petal assembly is bolted back in place.
Then you can adjust accordingly.

I always install a new hose when replacing the slave cylinder.
That's about it.
 
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