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Discussion Starter · #921 ·
I installed the cylinder head and the timing case with a new radial seal. Then I installed the camshaft trays with lifters, and then I installed the camshafts.









 

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Discussion Starter · #925 ·
One funny thing is that I forgot to order a new water pump. So I ordered one the other day and it showed up today. The original one is made by INA and has a composite impeller. It's lasted for a long time so I figured I'd order the same kind. This one by Saleri is also OEM. I also made sure to test the thermostat before I put it in there because a failed thermostat is what killed this engine.

 

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Sucks, but that will be easier now than later! I know nothing on these engines, but I sure like this build. I certainly get why you are doing this engine, but I sure wish I had an M57 diesel in one of mine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #928 ·
Sucks, but that will be easier now than later! I know nothing on these engines, but I sure like this build. I certainly get why you are doing this engine, but I sure wish I had an M57 diesel in one of mine...
I think I can replace it without taking the head off again. Someone measured it for me and it looks like it'll fit through the hole in the timing case housing if I remove the radial seal. So I ordered a new sprocket and a new seal.

I hope you are able to do an M57 conversion. A friend of mine had an X5 with that engine and I didn't care for it personally (I think mostly because of the turbo lag), but it should be a good match for the Defender. It would be a challenging conversion though. It has CAN bus like the M54, but is more complicated. Then it would need all the emissions stuff like the DPF and SCR with DEF to be road legal. I think you'd want to have an X5 donor to transfer all that over.
 

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I think I can replace it without taking the head off again. Someone measured it for me and it looks like it'll fit through the hole in the timing case housing if I remove the radial seal. So I ordered a new sprocket and a new seal.

I hope you are able to do an M57 conversion. A friend of mine had an X5 with that engine and I didn't care for it personally (I think mostly because of the turbo lag), but it should be a good match for the Defender. It would be a challenging conversion though. It has CAN bus like the M54, but is more complicated. Then it would need all the emissions stuff like the DPF and SCR with DEF to be road legal. I think you'd want to have an X5 donor to transfer all that over.
No way am I gonna do it now. After the last conversion (R2.8) I am set. I have an LS conversion too, so I’m engined out at least for now. Time to enjoy using them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #930 ·
The engine harness and ECU I have are from a 2000 Z3 M Roadster. So I built the engine to the same spec including the Z3M oil filter housing which has the oil temperature sensor that the M3 version does not have. Therefore, I decided I'm going to install the same gauges the Z3M has on the center console, which are the clock, voltmeter, and oil temperature.

It looks like the VDO Vision series gauges are discontinued in North America (replaced by "Cockpit" which do not have backside illumination), but are still available as the "Cockpit Vision" series in Europe. I got them from Germany.



 

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Discussion Starter · #931 ·
I'm frustrated with the brakes. The last few days, including all day today, I remade all of the brake pipes because I had some leaks with the flares I made using the Eastwood tool. I used the new tool from England which makes beautiful flares. So I was nearly 100% convinced I wouldn't have leaks. I was very careful to cut the pipe correctly with the pipe cutter and bezel the inside and outside edges 45 degrees like the instructions dictate. Now that I have them installed I tested for leaks and nearly all of them leak. They still leak no matter how much I tighten them.

I'm convinced the punch is making them the wrong shape. They should be more convex instead of a more flattened button shape. I think that's why most of the Eastwood flares didn't leak (only the crooked ones leaked I made after the tool started failing). So now I have to figure out what to do. Perhaps I should try the SAE Eastwood punch which I was using before that makes them more convex shape. But of course regardless I'll have to remake the pipes again.

I think the DIN punch works fine on softer metals like nickel copper because it will form into the correct shape when the fitting is tightened. That doesn't work for stainless. It needs to be the correct shape to begin with. I could give up on stainless and do the regular steel like factory. Stainless looks so nice though. I don't think I'm ready to give up yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #932 · (Edited)
I'm searching for a punch that has the correct shape. It looks like this company called Vigor in Germany makes good ones (they appear to be a Hazet brand). Here's a picture of the punch with flared pipe. The flare looks identical to the flare on a brand new brake pipe I got from Land Rover (I bought for prototyping). I'd like to find one that will fit the UK tool (or Eastwood, the thread is the same on both.)

 

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Discussion Starter · #933 ·
I just noticed ATE sells the UK brake flaring tool under their own brand. You would think as an OEM the tool they sell would have punches with the correct shape. It doesn't make any sense.


 

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Discussion Starter · #934 ·
It looks like the front circuits aren't leaking now. I kept the front left pipe (from the pump) and put that back. That one wasn't leaking, so I shouldn't have replaced it. I made new problems for myself. I just figured I'd have all matching flares from the new tool, but if it's not leaking I better leave it alone. I made a new front right caliper pipe tonight. It was leaking too at first, but I tightened it and it stopped so I guess it's fine (only at the hose. None of the fittings have leaked at the calipers which is interesting). Now hopefully I just need to deal with the rear circuits.

I sure got tired and grump last night lol. It doesn't help that I have to get up at 4:30 AM now to get ready for an early class.

I decided to route the pipes on the bulkhead under the lip like they are normally on a Td5 & Puma. I think that looks a little more clean. I have a new rear right pipe from Land Rover so I copied that and made the other two to go along with it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #935 · (Edited)
Here are the flares so you can see what's going on.

This is the UK tool (Sykes Pickavant 270) DIN flare compared to the Land Rover original. It comes out like a squished button. The Eastwood DIN punch makes a similar shape, but more ugly.



This is the flare produced with the Eastwood SAE punch compared to the Land Rover original. Much closer in shape, but slightly more narrow.



The hole is larger on the original one and none of the punches between either the Pickavant or Eastwood tool are able to produce a hole that size. I pushed the tip of the 1/4 OP 2 punch in the end to open it a little bigger. I'm not sure if that will matter though. I don't understand why neither tool manufacturer produced a punch that is identical to original. You'd think they could have used an original flare to make a mold.



So I think both flares are prone to leakage because they have less surface area to make a seal. Either from being too short or too narrow.
 

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The stainless angle sure looks more acute. Stainless isn‘t nearly as malleable, either. How frustrating! I admire your tenacity and willingness to suffer through this for your end goal. Just a thought, but is it possible to find a tool to grind/lap the seat to conform? The seat is going to most likely be more malleable…. Or lap the flare?
 

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Not saying this exact one, but maybe something even like this: Flare Lapping Tool | Brake & Fuel Lines | Koul Tools

or chat with them and ask…

looking at this closer, and noting the obvious contact patch of original, I personally wouldn’t suspect width of flare being a culprit. I think it is this non/malleable seam you can faintly see on the stainless. It can’t be there as you are not going to squash it down enough. I’d try a lapping tool on that before investing in another die tool. Just an observation.

you can see the seam more clearly on the actual pipe I bet. Or my photo is misleading and I’m wrong. I’m used to that too 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #938 · (Edited)
Thanks Davis. I'll look into the lapping tool. It appears it is for SAE inverted/double flares. I don't see one for metric DIN bubble flares. I did order another flaring tool and a different punch to try from Germany. I'll see if they produce a better flare. The original pipe has never been installed, so I think that seam is only from the flaring tool the factory used. It would be nice to know what the factory uses, but I bet it's a big automated machine that costs a million dollars.

I installed the new crankshaft sprocket. The timing case housing did have to come off. The chain guide is too close to the sprocket to remove the chain without doing that. I didn't replace the head gasket. Hopefully it's fine. I smeared it with dirko to seal it up. I'll replace it later if I have to.







 

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Discussion Starter · #939 ·
I'm experimenting making brake flares with the tool and punch I got from Germany.

I got this handheld BGS brand tool on Amazon. Amazon.de

And this punch for a Vigor brand tool. Amazon.de

The handheld BGS tool works for stainless if I clamp the pieces in a vice and then use a socket with a long handle ratchet to tighten the punch. I trimmed the back of the Vigor punch so I could fit it in the Sykes Pickavant turret tool, but because I can't screw it in I think the flare comes out slightly crooked.

The flare seems to turn out pretty well if I use the handheld tool and then a 2nd press with the Vigor punch which opens it up a little more. It looks pretty close to Land Rover's flare. The only issue with the handheld tool is that it roughs the surface a little because the punch turns against the pipe. It smooths it out a little if I press it in the Vigor punch afterwards. Now I'll have to make a pipe and test it for leaks.





 

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Discussion Starter · #940 · (Edited)
I think I found a winner for the brake flaring shape. I made a new front right caliper pipe and it doesn't leak.

After I've used the new tool a few times they are coming out more smooth too. I learned the two halves of the die need to be tightened with the supplied screws before securing it in the vice because it's difficult to align them properly without those in place.
 
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