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I'm looking to buy a Land Rover Defender from 1980-1989. Dose anyone here know the best place to find this item?? I "Googled" it, but it comes up short...

Thank You.
 

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You'll need to be quite a bit more specific. 90 or 110? Gas or diesel? LHD or RHD? Budget?
 

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I like the 90, but the 110 might be best. I'm moving to Montana or Wyoming and need either model that will get me through most anything that the winter throws at me...Gas.
 

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How good are you at turning wrenches or how high is your budget?
 

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What's your budget? $30k will get you something really good that needs little/no work. $15k will mean you getting your hands dirty (but parts are relatively cheap).

Also, do you need to carry people? Gear?

Gav
 

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I would like something in between the 15k-30k. If I'm going to spend 30k, the mileage needs to be low as in from 40k -60k. Either way that I go, I want low miles. So with all that said, and being in a place where in the winter you get dumped on. (I'm from the east coast. I have driven in the snow. But the trucks that I used were pretty much useless. Fords mostly. Even the 4x4 ford did nothing at all) I think those fords are not heavy enough to track well in the snow. Plus I would need a Very Good winch, if I need to help others out of the snow, or myself. Like I said, the 90 is Very nice, but I don't think it's going track as well as the 110...Suggestions??

------ Follow up post added June 21st, 2015 04:32 PM ------

I understand the LHD or RHD all has to do with handling of the land rover. Since I'm going for the 1980-1989 what is the better handling one and what is the mor "Aggressive" handling in snow and mud???
 

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I like the 90, but the 110 might be best. I'm moving to Montana or Wyoming and need either model that will get me through most anything that the winter throws at me...Gas.
Don't.

Get a Toyota, Dodge, Nissan, or similar…

I understand the LHD or RHD all has to do with handling of the land rover. Since I'm going for the 1980-1989 what is the better handling one and what is the mor "Aggressive" handling in snow and mud???
Nope - has nothing to do with handling - only has to do with where you sit when operating the vehicle...
 

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I have 2 low milage 110's for sale. One only 10 Kmiles and doesn't fit your budget, the other one appr 40 Kmiles almost in your budget and even comes with a snow plow !!!
 

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What is your experience with 4 wheel drive vehicles and driving in the snow in particular. What works well in the mud probably won't work well in the snow. "Aggressive" driving in the snow usually doesn't end well. But I'm from Florida so what do I know? Anyway, perhaps an LR4 or Toyota 4 Runner would suit your needs better than a 25 year old Defender with a shitty heater.
 

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I run my 110 and Series in VT winters perfectly fine. Run good snow tires, chains if it's a lot of ice. For heat a good rad muff, fume curtain, and nice think floor mats will do the trick. You can also make life really nice with a webasto heater. Also sent you a message about the couple Rovers I have in VT.
 

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What is your experience with 4 wheel drive vehicles and driving in the snow in particular. What works well in the mud probably won't work well in the snow. "Aggressive" driving in the snow usually doesn't end well. But I'm from Florida so what do I know? Anyway, perhaps an LR4 or Toyota 4 Runner would suit your needs better than a 25 year old Defender with a shitty heater.
Trying to figure your comparison of driving in the snow vs mud as it relates to the vehicle. A Rover in my opinion is best for both worlds.

It's the tires and driver's skill that makes the difference.
 

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Without a doubt the Tire makes all the difference. Like placing tennis shoes on when your going to to scale a mountain. That and experience go hand and hand. Thus is why I'm here.
 

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I have a very nice and low mileage LHD D90, massive wheels, rebuild truck, price is 25K plus shipping
 

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Trying to figure your comparison of driving in the snow vs mud as it relates to the vehicle. A Rover in my opinion is best for both worlds.

It's the tires and driver's skill that makes the difference.
To get up the mountain to my cabin in North Carolina in the summer you pretty much need 4 wheel drive. In the winter when there is snow on the ground I use a different driving style to get up the mountain. When I am up in the mountains in the snow I am not driving aggressively mainly because I don't want to end up sliding off the road and down the side of the mountain. It is not the same driving style as I use when I am slogging through a mud hole slinging mud everywhere.


As for how mud vs snow relates to the vehicle set up to aggressively run mud bogs or through the muddy swamp trails down here would be a different than a truck set up for the mountains and snow. If you don't believe me, you have an open invitation to visit when the run the next Mud Fest around here and see for yourself that a truck set to drive aggressively in the mud would probably kill you on a snowy/icy road.


Now if the OP just wants a trail rig that is a different conversation and what I was trying to find out. Perhaps I should have used better words.
 

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Trust me. I've been down both roads. Sloshing through the mud in Belize. And driving parts of Canada and the NE just after heavy snowfall.
My trip back from Halifax, there were two vehicles on the road. Me and a snowplow. And he was going the opposite direction.
 
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