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  #2801  
Old June 17th, 2019, 02:44 PM
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Nicholas Markiw
1994 NAS D90 LS 5.3L
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul K View Post
Anyone got a photo that shows the front of a 5.3 (LC9) with air con and power steering? I'm getting ready to put ancillaries on my V8 & want to make sure I get the right parts.
Paul,

Follow the direction for the Kwik Performance A/C bracket.
The alt/ps bracket assembly pictures are on my DropBox site.
Use a laser alignment tool to align the p/s pulley.

Why did you purchase my alt/ps bracket if this is RHD?
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  #2802  
Old June 20th, 2019, 02:45 AM
Mostlymonki
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Matt
1998 130, 1988 110
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Is anyone running a standard defender v8 rad successfuly? My allisport one lasted 9k miles before leaking in 3 places, and now having had it recored theyve welded the fan brackets on so badly I cant refit the fans... so looking for alternatives.

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  #2803  
Old June 20th, 2019, 02:52 AM
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blackrangie
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Ben
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mostlymonki View Post
Is anyone running a standard defender v8 rad successfuly? My allisport one lasted 9k miles before leaking in 3 places, and now having had it recored theyve welded the fan brackets on so badly I cant refit the fans... so looking for alternatives.

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Alloy ebay specials seem to have no probs in AU, im using one in the RRC with twin spals added.

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  #2804  
Old June 20th, 2019, 04:29 AM
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phoenix37
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john
97 D90 ST / 1957 S1 109/ 1983 LS110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mostlymonki View Post
Is anyone running a standard defender v8 rad successfuly? My allisport one lasted 9k miles before leaking in 3 places, and now having had it recored theyve welded the fan brackets on so badly I cant refit the fans... so looking for alternatives.

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yes.. i kept the stock rad from my 83 110 V8... was living in Florida at that time and never an overheat.
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  #2805  
Old June 20th, 2019, 06:20 AM
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Ben
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Another suggestion, if you can, run auto and engine oil coolers especially if in hot climate.

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  #2806  
Old June 23rd, 2019, 11:07 AM
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Paul Kennington
'85 Ninety V8 SW
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Sorry, thought I needed it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmarkiw View Post
Why did you purchase my alt/ps bracket if this is RHD?
Anyone have experience with this?

LS327 5.3 Computer and Harness OEM OBD2 - 2005 to Present - Turn Key Engine Supply
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  #2807  
Old June 25th, 2019, 10:06 AM
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blackrangie
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Ben
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul K View Post
Sorry, thought I needed it.







Anyone have experience with this?



LS327 5.3 Computer and Harness OEM OBD2 - 2005 to Present - Turn Key Engine Supply
Stick to speartech imo, the TUTD, shifter and even guages if you need are all sorted.

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  #2808  
Old June 26th, 2019, 09:48 PM
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Davis
94 NAS D90 6.2LS, '91 110 200 TDI
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Two things---The first is that I have been running the GM Power steering fluid in my truck since the swap. Never fully flushed out all the tranny fluid from before, but got a lot out. Everything for 2 years has been A-OK but tired of seeing a small drip so added some Blue Devil Transmission Stop Leak that I have used very successfully before in my other rovers. Maybe 10 drives in, my power steering box is whining more than a 4 year old that dropped his ice cream. I am 99% convinced that adding the tranny stop leak to the (now) power steering fluid F'ed everything up. Could have been a hell of a coincidence too... Shouldn't have done it...Which leads me to my other thing.

#2 Pressure reducing your pump.

I put off reducing my power steering pump pressure. I think we all know the GM Power steering pump puts out too much pressure (over 1200psi) for our hard to get steering boxes and could blow the seals or quicker wear. There is a Borgeson 899001 Pressure Reducing Kit that you can buy for a whopping $20 (I paid $17 on Amazon) and has several shims and good instructions. I used 3 shims making it 850psi, within the range of our boxes. With my pump out, it took 5 minutes. It drives great, no issues at all. None. Should have done it immediately and no down side. I recommend doing it.
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  #2809  
Old June 26th, 2019, 10:42 PM
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Ben
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis View Post
Two things---The first is that I have been running the GM Power steering fluid in my truck since the swap. Never fully flushed out all the tranny fluid from before, but got a lot out. Everything for 2 years has been A-OK but tired of seeing a small drip so added some Blue Devil Transmission Stop Leak that I have used very successfully before in my other rovers. Maybe 10 drives in, my power steering box is whining more than a 4 year old that dropped his ice cream. I am 99% convinced that adding the tranny stop leak to the (now) power steering fluid F'ed everything up. Could have been a hell of a coincidence too... Shouldn't have done it...Which leads me to my other thing.

#2 Pressure reducing your pump.

I put off reducing my power steering pump pressure. I think we all know the GM Power steering pump puts out too much pressure (over 1200psi) for our hard to get steering boxes and could blow the seals or quicker wear. There is a Borgeson 899001 Pressure Reducing Kit that you can buy for a whopping $20 (I paid $17 on Amazon) and has several shims and good instructions. I used 3 shims making it 850psi, within the range of our boxes. With my pump out, it took 5 minutes. It drives great, no issues at all. None. Should have done it immediately and no down side. I recommend doing it.
Thankyou, very helpful, im getting a whine (sounds like swarm of bees) but no bubbles in PSC remote hydro resivour.

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  #2810  
Old June 27th, 2019, 09:56 AM
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Davis
94 NAS D90 6.2LS, '91 110 200 TDI
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Not sure if you are supposed to pressure bled the box, but I did. I really did an awful thing--I wanted to flush the new pump and box completely and get rid of residual tranny fluid in the box, so I was running some inexpensive prestone power steering fluid (right spec) through the pump/box. Grab a second small bottle, put it in, and the bottle rolled over...revealing it was...BRAKE fluid. It was put on the wrong place at the auto store, same prestone yellow bottle and size, but 100% my fault for not checking (even rang it up as power steering due to multiple bottles). To me, this was incredibly bad and harmful so I rushed down to the store and bought a gallon of power steering fluid--I drained what I could first and then just started adding fluid. Since new pump came with a cap, I drilled a hole in the old one and applied some air pressure and bled the box--not too much pressure--maybe 10-20psi, just to get fluid moving-- and bled a gallon through it. Super clean now. About 1/2 way through I also started to bleed by turning the wheel. Did everything I could to get the brake fluid out. Then I re-bled with GM fluid. Confident things are good now but glad I noticed! Both are clear fluids (brake a power steering), btw. Tip--change back to the undrilled cap before bleeding by turning the steering wheel or you will shoot fluid through the hole in the other cap=messy...

That said, air bleeding this way seemed to work great. No air coming out afterwards and I thought I would pass it on not to throw away your extra caps :-)

If anyone knows a reason you should not do this, please chime in as I have never heard one way or the other--I just needed a quick way to get a lot of fluid through the system...
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  #2811  
Old June 27th, 2019, 10:16 AM
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Daniel Archer
1966 109 Restomod
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Responding to the earlier question about the harness from LSX or BDturnkey or justchevytrucks.com. I'd be very careful with anything from these guys. They are up in Maine and all their salvage modded stuff has been through very salty Winters. I bought a remanufactured L33 from them and have had a lot of pcm issues and now all the paint on the block and valve covers is bubbling off like it was installed on a dirty engine. At the time it seemed like a good deal for the exact engine I wanted with tbss manifold and all, but if I'd have to do it over again I'd source it locally.
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  #2812  
Old June 28th, 2019, 07:47 AM
ezzzzzzz
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Mark Garrenton
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Regarding the aftermarket solid aluminum radiators, thete are two things you must do. First, isolate the rad from the support using plastic washers and sleeves. This stops the galvanic action. Second, drill a small hole in the fill neck, where the cap seal won't contact it, and using a bit of stainless wire attach an small zinc anode to hang in the tank. I lost 2 radiators in my IIA 4.3 V6 conversion before I figured that out.
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  #2813  
Old June 28th, 2019, 08:12 AM
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This is a huge topic for the Jeep LS swaps, seems with all the flexing of the mounts it was twisting and cracking the radiators. Rubber mounts allowing it to float was one of the answers among many. This is one idea similar to your anode idea that goes in the drain plug:


https://www.summitracing.com/int/par...FVY7gQodNVYD-A


OE tablets and a properly sized pressure cap are very important as well. This is a quote from Robbie at Motech in Vegas, he forgets more than I will ever know when it comes to LS swaps:


There is a lot more to it but there is something you can do. The JK like other modern computerized vehicles have a lot of electrons flowing around and the goal is to keep it out of the cooling system. Doesn't matter how good your radiator is, Ron Davis, CBR, Griffin.... they will all leak over time.

Start your JK and carefully check the charge in the coolant. We want to see as little voltage as possible. Popular belief is up to 1.5 volts is acceptable because that is where corrosion starts, I would like to see it lower. With all the accessories on check the voltage, make sure the cooling fans are running. I have seen voltages over 3 volts resulting in heater cores going out, water pump fittings eroding, and of coarse radiators leaking.

There is a belief a ground strap to the radiator will help but I feel it's better to not have the charge to begin with. Recently we had a customer fight bad electrolysis, his radiator began to leak and all the metal fittings were eroding. Didn't help the guy was in Florida right off the ocean and drove on the beach. To make a long story short all the usual things were checked, ground strap added, fan replaced but the charge was still there. As crazy as it sounds an old time GM mechanic stated a bad starter could cause electrolysis in the cooling system. If you think about it the main battery cables meet at your starter motor so proper isolation is critical. It's similar to power and ground distribution inside of an Optima battery that breaks down and the battery self discharges, or worse freaks out your engine performance due to the loss of proper low reference.

This guy in Florida had a bad starter motor, it was a new Delco part right from GM. Replacing the starter motor dropped the coolant charge to below 1 volt from over 3 and his erosion stopped. I'm sure OE manufacturers engineer the cooling system with this in mind but you can't cover everything. I remember in the 80's and 90's cooling system charge messing with the then new electronics that were being developed. The newer electronics were working in milli-volts and amps unlike the old days and were more susceptible to fluctuations. There were procedures to discharge the cooling system(drain it) recommended by manufacturers. This is one reason low reference came around.

You need an HD radiator to run a V8 hard in a JK, all you can do is take preventative measures to avoid leaks. Check you cooling system charge and run the OE tablets or a small amount of Alumseal. Do not run too much or you will plug your heater core. If you see the header sweating vs an actual leak you may have a electrolysis issue. Most of the current radiators available are pretty good, I have $1k+ custom built radiators in the shop now, in fact one on a Gen V 6.2 were doing and it is just as susceptible, actually more susceptible, to leak than the stock plastic radiator.
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  #2814  
Old June 28th, 2019, 10:48 AM
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Davis
94 NAS D90 6.2LS, '91 110 200 TDI
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I talked with Ron Davis about this specifically. He told me to follow these procedures:

Testing for electrolysis in cooling systems

A voltmeter capable of reading both AC and DC currents is required to test cooling systems. The meter needs to read zero to the maximum voltage of the system being tested in tenths of a volt. The meter leads must be long enough to reach between the coolant and the groundside of the battery. An ohm function of a voltmeter is very helpful to pinpoint areas of resistance in as electrical system that will cause an electrical current to ground through the coolant rather than the engineered electrical circuit.
Procedure

Attach the proper meter lead to the groundside of the battery, negative-to-negative or positive-to-positive.

Install the second lead in the coolant touching the coolant only.

Read the DC and AC voltage with all systems off. If a block heater is present, also take a reading with the heater turned on. If an automatic battery charger is present, as a standby system, also take a reading with this system running.

Read the DC and AC voltage with the electrical starter engaged.

Read the DC and the AC voltage with the engine running and all systems turned on: lights, coolers, fans, heaters, air conditioning, cell phone, two-way radio, including the phone and radio on both standby and transmit.

The above procedure will test a complete system except for an electrical current, which can be generated by the rear end transmission. This is particularly true with air bag suspensions, rubber pad suspensions and rubber-mounted transmissions. Any current generated will travel up to the drive shaft to ground through the engine coolant. Grounding rear ends and transmissions is strongly recommended.

Voltage of zero to .3 is normal in a coolant of cast iron engine. Such an engine will be destroyed with time by .5 volts, and engine manufactures are reporting .15 volts will destroy an aluminum engine.

The current will be AC if the problem is due to static electricity.

If the coolant shows an electrical problem with all the equipment turned on; turn off one system at a time until you finally turn off the system that stops the electrical current. When the current stops, this will indicate the electrical system causing the problem.

Be partially careful of starters. They can cause as much damage to a cooling system as a direct connection to an arc welder. This is due to the amperage present.

Always change the coolant if a current is detected. The electrical current will destroy the protecting chemicals in a properly inhibited coolant.



The following are failures that are not manufacturer defects and therefore not covered under warranty.



Improper Flush - Cooling systems require a through flush of the radiator, engine, overflow tank, hoses and heater core, failure to do so will lead to mixing coolants and contaminates and creating a deadly cocktail for the cooling system.



Corrosion The correct coolant and distilled water mixture prescribed by the coolant manufacture of choice must be maintained. Water with high trace elements of minerals will create problems for aluminum radiators not normally seen in copper radiators.

Electrolysis Electrolysis is the systematic removal of the protective layer on the inside of the radiator tubes due to improper grounding. Electrical grounding problems can stem from poor installation of aftermarket accessories or incorrect vehicle collision damages.

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  #2815  
Old June 28th, 2019, 11:36 AM
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Amit Likhyani
95 D90 Soft Top Estoril Blue 6.2 LS
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I had a leak on my Ron Davis and miraculously the OE pills competely stopped it and I'm having no issues currently in the desert with my Gen IV 6.2 L94. If/when the leaks return I'll definitely follow this procedure on the new radiator.
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  #2816  
Old June 30th, 2019, 01:17 PM
misternn
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Alan
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power steering plumbing pic needed

hey guys anyone have a photo of the plumbing between power steering pump and steering gearbox? thanks! Alan
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  #2817  
Old June 30th, 2019, 01:31 PM
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Mack Crouch
1988 110 LS 5.3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by misternn View Post
hey guys anyone have a photo of the plumbing between power steering pump and steering gearbox? thanks! Alan
Truck style power steering pump.
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  #2818  
Old July 1st, 2019, 01:37 PM
misternn
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Alan
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fuel system questions

ok moving on to fuel system, gonna hit you guys with a couple questions as I go-

My truck is a ROW pickup, with tank under the seat. I have the Wix filter/regulator and the Walbro external pump that is in the BOM.

1. where did you mount the filter/regulator? pics if possible.
2. where did you mount the pump?

thanks...Alan

ps thanks Macker for the steering pic, that is just what I needed...
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  #2819  
Old July 3rd, 2019, 07:48 AM
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blackrangie
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Ben
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Quote:
Originally Posted by misternn View Post
ok moving on to fuel system, gonna hit you guys with a couple questions as I go-

My truck is a ROW pickup, with tank under the seat. I have the Wix filter/regulator and the Walbro external pump that is in the BOM.

1. where did you mount the filter/regulator? pics if possible.
2. where did you mount the pump?

thanks...Alan

ps thanks Macker for the steering pic, that is just what I needed...
Close to tank as possible for both and away from heat..also are you running a lift pump?

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  #2820  
Old July 13th, 2019, 12:18 PM
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Just a couple of questions about the weld in engine mounts. I was looking over the BOM and one picture shows the jig tab on the top and the other where it's laid out shows it on the bottom??


Also not sure which way the plate goes but I haven't gone out to the garage to see if it's obvious yet.


Hoping to get it in today but I'm sure I'll get side tracked.



Thanks,
Sean
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