88 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild - Page 3 - Defender Source
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  #41  
Old June 15th, 2018, 12:28 AM
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Jim Cheney
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Great stuff, I love following this one.
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  #42  
Old June 15th, 2018, 12:49 AM
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Jamie Austin
1992 110 Td5 CSW & 1989 MB G-Wagen
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Looking really good!
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  #43  
Old August 7th, 2018, 10:23 PM
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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Location: Greater Toronto, ON, Canada
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Finished the doors

So, finished the doors. Ended up installing all new felt channels. Plastic pieces looked tired and I contemplated painting them for a minute (per the Defender resto manual), but then tried Meguiar's Ultimate Black paste (used to be called "back to black", but, I guess, Amy's IP owners got to them) and it worked like a damn. Just apply and polish with a regular applicator or microfiber cloth and it looks like new again.






The handles were rubbing against the door skin, so I went drastic and cut them down and used the closest hole. No more rubbing or sticking:


Side-by-side comparison of Original Land Rover (right) and aftermarket (Bearmach) (left) locks. So far, I've replaced both front ones after just 6 months of occasional use and am now waiting for the rear ones to go soon too, at which point I'll put original locks in as well. Bearmach ones are [email protected]$!, made of tinfoil and thin plastic, very flimsy and weigh about 1/2 of the originals:




Now the doors look too nice for the rest of the truck, I really hope to get to strip and paint it some time in the near future.....
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  #44  
Old August 7th, 2018, 10:44 PM
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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More things taken apart :-)

Now, I got bored and decided I didn't have enough things taken apart in my house, so I decided to rebuild the two winches that I've had laying around.


A while back I bought me 2 winches as parts, Warn M12000 and M15000, with an intention of putting eventually them on my Landy.
I figured I needed at least 12K Lbs, calculating curb weight at 8K Lbs and multiplying it by a factor of 1.5. I then came across a Kijiji ad for 6 different Warn winches, the only working one being the smallest, at 8k Lbs, which I thought was too small for me, so I picked up a 12K and a 15K instead.
I'm a much smarter man now, knowing that most Defenders have no larger than a 9K Lbs winch (including the LR's own Special Expedition Vehicles)....

Anyway, both winches I picked up wouldn't free-spool, were all covered in oil for whatever reason, the motor on M15 was seized, and on M12 was somewhat alive, but eventually shorted during testing. M15 lived a very hard life and had its tie rods ground by cable as well as bent, so it looked horrible.


M15000:


M12000:


I bought me a new M15 contactor pack and one new motor, along with all new bushings and gaskets and a new brake.
I found the best video on a typical Warn winch rebuild, that covers 90% of the required knowledge, and I'll cover what was different for me in my rebuild below.

The plan is to just rebuild M12 and sell it to buy a smaller winch to put in the rear, and rebuild M15 (powdercoating all exposed parts) with the new contactor pack and motor, convert it to synthetic rope and put in the front.
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  #45  
Old August 9th, 2018, 06:45 PM
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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Winches - M12000

M12000 pulled apart:



Motor brushes looking good:



Stator looks grimy, so needs cleaning and armature studs need cleaning to restore insulation (which caused the motor to short). Rotor was in good shape, needing just a quick polish:



A little trick that helps compress and remove the brake in one piece (cable tie works just as well, or even just a few wraps of electrical tape):



To remove the gear from the gear housing you will need to remove two retaining rings (the video I referenced above fails to mention this fact):



REASSEMBLY - M12000
All gears were in great shape, hardly any wear on them. All received a diesel bath and thorough brushing prior to reassembly.


Older gears installed inside the gear housing have balls, whereas newer ones don't (giggity). The easiest method I found to work for me was to partially slide the gear in the housing at an angle that leaves just enough of a gap to insert balls into the groove and send them rolling down. When the last ball is inserted, I leveled the gear and lowered it down. Easy and fast:

I used just a super-light coat of gun oil on the surface of this gear to make it easier get it in, most will say you shouldn't use any oil at all, but I found that just a bit of gun oil helps without having any long-term adverse effects.

Again, older gear housings have a different retainer for the clutch lever. Both use ball and spring, but newer ones have a screw that holds them in place, whereas older ones use a pin, as illustrated:



All gears are lubed with just enough of Aeroshell 64, the gear housing is assembled on the drum support with all-new gaskets and bushings, cleaned motor assembled into the other drum support and tested (runs well now after cleaning), drum brake and shaft reinserted, and the entire winch is assembled together.
Solenoid pack installed and the winch is tested for freespooling, and winching in and out.




PS: Eagle eyes may be able to spot what's wrong with the above picture :-)
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  #46  
Old August 9th, 2018, 07:06 PM
Vedrover
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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Winch rebuild - M15000

M15000 gear housing pulled apart:


Once again, despite the ugly looks, gears looked almost brand-new, so, again, a diesel bath and thorough brushing.

I then left the gear housing, drum supports and drum with the powder-coaters.... BTW grey powder coat is approx. 30% more expensive than black.

Motor was in far worse shape, the brush holder (which in newer motors is one piece, that has brushes and an integrated bearing bracket) was toast: one of the brushes appears to have been worn beyond normal and caused the plastic holder to overheat and start melting:


The piece is now obsolete and old stocks sells for silly money (about 50% of the new motor), so an initial decision to rebuild this motor to keep as a spare was quickly abandoned.

Once again, all gears carefully lubed with Aeroshell 64 and assembled in place with 2 bolts used as guides and to keep the gaskets in place:


And here's the housing assembled on the drum support:


Brand new motor installed into another drum support:



And now I'm still waiting for brand new bushings and stickers from WARN to arrive to finish the reassembly. Hoping to finish tomorrow.
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  #47  
Old April 10th, 2019, 09:36 AM
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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A bit of an update: this truck is currently my daily driver, and has being going strong, with no major issues to date.
Today, however, she decided she had enough of that: standing at the intersection, heater fan all of a sudden quit working, brake check light came on and all followed by plume of smoke coming from the fuse panel area.
I cleared the intersection and pulled over. Fan restarted in the process, but I shut it off right away. Smoke subsided pretty quick, brake light cleared, and I was able to just get to my office parking lot. I always drive around with a fire extinguisher, so I figured I had a good chance to kill any fire if there was one, hence the no shutting off the engine right away.


Stopped the car, shut off the engine, popped the hood and pulled the fuse panel out, and went around to have a looksee. All fuses and relays were good, wires in the fuse box were fine, without any signs of overheating.
However, in the engine bay, the White/Brown wire from the brake pressure differential switch was toasted from the engine bay connector up:



This is the wire that supposedly goes to the dash light. The black/white wire going to the brake check relay seems to be OK.
No other wire seems to have been damaged.


I'm wondering what the frack went on. Can't have any better idea than just the wire insulation failure and a subsequent short. Brake check light seems to come on with ignition on and then disappear on engine restart, so, still working correctly.
I will put electrical tape over the exposed wire for now and still plan on driving it back home tonight and then pulling the covers to inspect the rest of the wire.


Any other ideas?
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From another forum on "what killed the British auto industry":
- "I'm pretty sure it was Joseph Lucas."
- "Ah, The Prince of Darkness with his three position switch: "off, flicker and dim"."
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  #48  
Old May 9th, 2019, 09:32 PM
Vedrover
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Alex
1988 Land Rover 110
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Anyway, the above electrical problem has been resolved, details are in another thread. Incorrect wiring was the issue, surprised it lasted this long before deciding to manifest itself.

In the meantime, it's been a while since I wanted to do something about the rear brakes and leaking diff flange seal. But instead, I got me a whole new old axle from a fellow forum member.

We've recently moved and I couldn't think of a better way to introduce us to the new (and newly built) neighborhood than by doing a single-hand rear-axle swap on the street (my garage sucks now).

Here we go:

Vehicle jacked up and supported, new axle wheeled close by:




Brakes and everything else that needs to be disconnected, is disconnected. Axle jacked up to work on the big bolts:


You can just remove lower arms from the axle and replace it this way, but, as it turned out, the new axle had the lower arms brackets repaired and they put up a huge fight, so, I had to remove the lower arms completely to reinstall them. Axle now pulled out:




Springs went into the new axle, it rolled in, brakes connected, and everything bolted back together.
Good as new again!
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From another forum on "what killed the British auto industry":
- "I'm pretty sure it was Joseph Lucas."
- "Ah, The Prince of Darkness with his three position switch: "off, flicker and dim"."
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