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  #21  
Old March 7th, 2012, 05:18 PM
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I know that several folks here have built brackets for the York / 3.9 V8 combo but I've never seen a full write-up or plans for this. Anybody have some pictures or something to go by?
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  #22  
Old March 9th, 2012, 08:42 PM
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The Defender 200tdi AC pulley has a central pulley with a diameter of approximately 6.75". The pulley on the York clutch is 6". The York 210 displaces 10.3 cc/rev Therefore, the following table estimates the airflow:

Engine York cc/min cfm (free) cfm(90psi) cfm(120psi)
800 rpm 900 152100 5.37 0.90 0.67
1200 1350 228150 8.06 1.34 1.01
1600 1800 304200 10.74 1.79 1.34
2000 2250 380250 13.43 2.24 1.68
2400 2700 456300 16.11 2.69 2.01
2800 3150 532350 18.80 3.13 2.35
3200 3600 608400 21.49 3.58 2.69
3800 4275 722475 25.51 4.25 3.19
4200 4725 798525 28.20 4.70 3.53
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  #23  
Old March 9th, 2012, 09:01 PM
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Some photos.
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  #24  
Old March 9th, 2012, 10:26 PM
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My rebuilt York came with the flange fittings head.

Flange Fittings must be sourced externally or DYI. It is better to get the fittings from the junkyard. You can buy separately from folks who resell York compressors for massive markups:

http://www.kilbystore.com/28723.html

$45 for a pair.

The output side of the compressor has a maximum internal diameter of 0.3875". The input side of the compressor tapers, from 0.593" to 0.502".

Because I am only using pressure output to 150psi with a tank blowoff valve of 180psi, I will be drilling and tapping the 1/8" steel cover plates that came with the engine and use NPT tapered fittings with threadlock. If I was compressing to 300psi I would consider using thicker flanges.

http://machiningproducts.com/html/NP...imensions.html

Shows that the maximum thread for the output side is 1/8" NPT.
The maximum thread for the input side is 1/4" NPT.

This may constrain total airflow, but at 5cfm @ 90psi, 1/8" NPT should be sufficient.
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  #25  
Old March 9th, 2012, 11:21 PM
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Keep in mind that when you see compressor specs, they rate using scfm, not actual cfm at pressure, so it is more the flow at the inlet, so the flows are more as per your inlet, but reduced for the compressor efficiency.
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  #26  
Old March 10th, 2012, 01:36 PM
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Affirmative, red. These compressors really heat up the air! 240 to 300 degrees i hear. That's like...a third of the actual airflow at room temp.

I'm contemplating stainless or copper flare fittings up to the check valve.

I'm also contemplating using a transmission cooler to act as a heat exchanger for the compressed air.
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  #27  
Old March 10th, 2012, 07:58 PM
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Purdy. What are the air temps when it comes out of the chuck, say 8 ft away? A cooler sounds like unneeded complexity to me, but that sounds crazy hot!
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  #28  
Old March 10th, 2012, 08:47 PM
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Distance from surface of timing cover to near edge of ac pulley - 2.3"

Distance from surface of timing cover to far edge of ac pulley - 2.93"

Distance from surface of timing cover to center of ac pulley - 2.615"

Distance from surface of timing cover to far edge of AC mount area on surface timing cover - 0.860"

Distance from edge of 1st pulley to outer mounting hole on compressor - 1.35" to 1.95", center - 1.65"

Center of 2nd pulley to outer mounting hole on compressor - 2.25"

------ Follow up post added March 10th, 2012 08:50 PM------
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgalpin View Post
Purdy. What are the air temps when it comes out of the chuck, say 8 ft away? A cooler sounds like unneeded complexity to me, but that sounds crazy hot!
I will be using a stainless 3 gallon reservoir at the rear of the truck...not sure what the temperature is like on a direct connection to the air compressor, but I don't think the performance of the compressor will be good without a reservoir. Usually, the air cools rapidly once inside the reservoir
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  #29  
Old March 10th, 2012, 09:59 PM
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horizontal mounting bracket hole spacing is 1.8125" or 46mm

total space for mounting bracket hole next to timing cover plate bolt is 0.5".

This is too narrow to safely accomodate a 3/8-16 bolt. More like a 1/4"-20 or M6. Maybe an M8, but that really doesn't leave a lot of aluminum to hold the bolt in.
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  #30  
Old March 11th, 2012, 11:27 AM
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I have one of these 210 compressors in the garage waiting for me to make a bracket to fit to my Td5's.


should be good, as the Td5 is serp belt anyway, and there is a "flat" area where the AC compressor usually lives.
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  #31  
Old March 11th, 2012, 11:07 PM
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Using inner pulley

0.25" spacing between tubing and brackets to allow for fine tuning of pulley alignment using washers/spacers.
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  #32  
Old March 11th, 2012, 11:10 PM
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Bottom Bracket Plate
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  #33  
Old March 12th, 2012, 10:40 AM
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I forgot about the tank. Ok, I definitely think a cooler is overkill then. I got some pictures of a york OBA setup on Jeep that I'll send to you, just as a reference point. He's running an input air filter, oil filter/catcher with manual valve to drain it back to the compressor (he says it is very seldom used), back flow valve, blow off valve, pressure cutoff switch, tank, manifold, regulator, and ARB plumbed in as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonoronos View Post
I will be using a stainless 3 gallon reservoir at the rear of the truck...not sure what the temperature is like on a direct connection to the air compressor, but I don't think the performance of the compressor will be good without a reservoir. Usually, the air cools rapidly once inside the reservoir
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  #34  
Old March 12th, 2012, 12:25 PM
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thanks much charles!
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  #35  
Old March 12th, 2012, 01:32 PM
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I figured I'd put them here. The first picture shows the york, with an air filter on the intake.
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Then the oil collector

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This one shows the valve to open to empty the oil back into the pump. He said if the oil level is correct in the york it should hardly ever need using.

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The backflow (one way) valve

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This shows the cutoff switch and a pressure gauge. Under there is a manifold that goes to the tank, and a valve that will go open at 180psi iirc in case the electrical cutoff fails.

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This is where the arb hookups are, with an additional regulator to drop it down to 80 psi (his is adjustable).

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  #36  
Old March 12th, 2012, 02:22 PM
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thanks again for the pics charles, these are very helpful.

attached is a manifold designed to attach to the compressor itself.
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  #37  
Old March 12th, 2012, 02:32 PM
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Can you explain the routing of the hoses to the tank - your diagram shows two hoses going front and rear.

I think there are two flaws with this idea

1. You are exposing everything to vibration. It's better to have a hose go to the manifold mounted somewhere without the vibration. Ask Bobeck - he mounted his ARB on the engine and moved it after it shook the shit out of it.
2. More clutter on the engine than necessary
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  #38  
Old March 12th, 2012, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgalpin View Post
Can you explain the routing of the hoses to the tank - your diagram shows two hoses going front and rear.

I think there are two flaws with this idea

1. You are exposing everything to vibration. It's better to have a hose go to the manifold mounted somewhere without the vibration. Ask Bobeck - he mounted his ARB on the engine and moved it after it shook the shit out of it.
2. More clutter on the engine than necessary
The check valve mounts to the upper left. The tank is mounted dead left, so the manifold is at tank pressure. Dead right is a hose that goes to a grill or bumper-mounted air (kind of like what Jeff has sticking out of his bumperettes).

What happened to Bobeck's ARB? Isn't that the compressor and not the fittings? Usually the manifold on the compressor makes the whole setup much tidier
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  #39  
Old March 12th, 2012, 03:21 PM
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So one big system, ok - makes sense. But no one way valve to keep pressure separate from the pump? I don't know if there are any negatives to this or not. I still think both points are valid. Other than one hose to the manifold mounted elsewhere, it's no less tidy wherever you put it, and will not be affected by vibration. But don't let me stop you doing this

I assume even the fittings could do without the vibration, but the switches too.
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  #40  
Old March 12th, 2012, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgalpin View Post
So one big system, ok - makes sense. But no one way valve to keep pressure separate from the pump? I don't know if there are any negatives to this or not. I still think both points are valid. Other than one hose to the manifold mounted elsewhere, it's no less tidy wherever you put it, and will not be affected by vibration. But don't let me stop you doing this

I assume even the fittings could do without the vibration, but the switches too.
Oops, I'm sorry I didn't make it clear, there is a valve to keep pressure separate from the pump. It is threaded into the upper left port on the manifold (the device is a 3/8" check valve)

You may be proven right in the long run! Truth be told, a lot of the pictures and measurements I put up are to be for information purposes only. I can't even guarantee that my bracket design works until it's built or that everyone's AC pulley centerline is 2.615" from the face of the timing case cover
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