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  #21  
Old November 30th, 2009, 09:49 AM
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I've always used BFG A/Ts here in Colorado with good results. However, recently I've been eyeballing the General Grabber AT2, mainly due to their lower cost and (supposedly) equivalent performance.
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  #22  
Old December 1st, 2009, 11:25 PM
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paul girard
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I'm going to be in Seattle so from what I've researched snow is not that big of a concern just the occasional ice patch. It looks like the BFGs are the best bet. For the questions on the avatar I honestly don't remember the source I stumbled on it on some MAC forum. I sat there laughing my head off for a good 5 minutes - figured you guys would like it.
That's a good tip to drive in a big parking lot. Just need to find an icy one up there and slide around till I get the hang of it.
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  #23  
Old December 2nd, 2009, 02:51 PM
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Andrew J. Hutton
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Winter tires are very different and recently got a lot more advanced than the ones even 10 years ago. I run Blizzak P965 (I think, am in Peru right now so cannot check exact model easily) but the need is more based on average temperature than anything. The rubber used these days has embedded grit
and is much softer than all-season or summer compounds so that it will heat up and give traction at lower temperatures which is critical even on bare roads. The other major change is the smaller tread blocks with heavy zig-zag sipes cut into it, the cuts flex when slowing or speeding up increasing surface
grip significantly, the zig-zag locks them into a single block when steering.

Any time average temperature is below about 5-8C a winter compound is really a good idea. Warmer than that and like rain slicks you wear them quickly. As people have mentined a 2nd set of tires is really just the storage space and rim cost since wear is spread over all your sets anyway.

Deep snow Offroad is an entirely different story, cannot beat a set of Simex or Silverstones with the ET tread and sipes cut into the centre tread blocks. Not very realistic though for most of us, so a set of good diamond chains is a good alternative.
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  #24  
Old December 2nd, 2009, 03:42 PM
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Jay Hobbs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newfD90
I've always used BFG A/Ts here in Colorado with good results. However, recently I've been eyeballing the General Grabber AT2, mainly due to their lower cost and (supposedly) equivalent performance.
I've had a hell of a time balancing my AT2s on my Disco. They are 18s so that may be part of the problem, but I'll never buy another set.
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  #25  
Old December 4th, 2009, 10:38 PM
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Has anyone here tried these?

http://www.greendiamondtire.com/

They seem priced pretty reasonable and the testimonials sound authentic. For you lefties they are environmentally friendly (save 3-5 gallons of oil per tire produced) & not sold at Wal Mart. For you right-wingers they are made in America and are so good in the snow that even Rush Limbaugh could avoid a crash while coked up on his cleaning lady's pain killers. They make a couple of light truck specific models and show a D110 on the site. Although they are made for the snow people are running the light truck series year round. the MT version looks like a cross between a mud terrain and a rock crawling tread; would look pretty cool on a Defender and hopefully perform as well as it looks. As an added bonus the dealer in Denver gives a 10% discount for Solihull Society members.
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  #26  
Old December 5th, 2009, 02:45 AM
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Mike Hammond
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[QUOTE=KevinNY]
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1000kva
I have a manual ford truck, plus I have a lead foot. With it raining in Florida I can't tell you how many times I have peeled out when leaving a traffic light or even started to hydroplane when the water gets to deep. QUOTE]

Bottom line is no tire is going to help you if you continue to drive like that, you will be in the ditch. First time it snows go find a big empty parking lot, pretend there is an egg taped to the gas and brake pedals, and learn.
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  #27  
Old December 8th, 2009, 07:19 PM
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Rick Askew
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I'm also shopping for new tires, and have been looking at the new Goodyear Duratrac. This post is 30 pages long, but the tire seems to be getting some good reviews by the Jeep guys (one of them is in Alaska, so he knows snow):

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f15/g...ratrac-701455/
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  #28  
Old December 9th, 2009, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaygoss
Has anyone here tried these?

http://www.greendiamondtire.com/
I have a set of the AT's on my pickup and a set of MT's for my gf's pickup should be in next week or so. I only have about 4k miles on mine so far. I have a mile long gravel driveway that I maintain myself. It has a couple of hills in it that can be challenging when snowpacked and I've always run studded tires so I could get up it alright. The bad thing about studs is after the first season, when they wear down, they aren't nearly as effective. My hope is that, although I don't think green diamond tires are any where near as good as new studs, they might be better on average over the life of the tire. Oddly, the green diamond tires seem to help more with stopping than they do with acceleration from a stop. I met Rich at the business in Denver when I picked up my tires. Seemed like a nice guy. I liked the looks of the MT, I guess that explains why there's a couple month wait for them. I thought they were kinda pricey, too, but I guess that's a matter of perspective. All in all, I'd say short of a new set of studded tires every season, these may be the best option for me. I have my fingers crossed any way. I'll know better when I have a whole winter's worth of driving under my belt.
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  #29  
Old December 9th, 2009, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Hayward
Oddly, the green diamond tires seem to help more with stopping than they do with acceleration from a stop.
Thanks for the feedback, Rod. I wonder if that has to do with weight distribution shift while decelerating vs accelerating. On decel the weight shifts forward, over engine compartment, which would apply more downward force to the wheels. On accel the weight shifts rearward over the truck bed; less downward force and less traction. Just a theory- thought I'd throw that out there in case my high school physics teacher happens to have a D90 and is reading this.....
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