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  #41  
Old December 26th, 2013, 11:01 PM
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I use the old style metal clip rails. You can get them at Harbor Freight/Sears etc. I cut them to length. From there I can throw them in a tool pouch for the trail, or take set to the task so I don't have to go back and forth to the box. This is what I use on the trail. http://www.defendersource.com/forum/...0&postcount=27 -Jeff
5'spark plug sockets??
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  #42  
Old December 26th, 2013, 11:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSBriggs View Post
I use the old style metal clip rails. You can get them at Harbor Freight/Sears etc. I cut them to length. From there I can throw them in a tool pouch for the trail, or take set to the task so I don't have to go back and forth to the box.

This is what I use on the trail. http://www.defendersource.com/forum/...0&postcount=27

-Jeff

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  #43  
Old December 27th, 2013, 12:00 AM
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craftsman 263 piece tool kit, a set of 1/2" drive standard impact sockets for when 6 point sockets are needed, breaker bar, and torque wrench are a good start.

http://www.viewpoints.com/Craftsman-...ol-set-reviews

the 263 piece tool kit is what I take on long trips. I've drilled a hole in all the drawers and put a rod in there to keep them from sliding open while driving. Even at home with a giant tool chest filled with all kinds of stuff I find myself going to the small kit for convenience. You'll need some needle nose and snap ring pliers and a crescent or 2 to complete the home mechanic necessities. Harbor freight is good enough for that kind of stuff.
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  #44  
Old December 27th, 2013, 12:00 AM
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The sad part is I know that but lately when I finish, I'm so fawking cold I don't care. I just want to go inside and drink a hot coffee with some irish whiskey added for flavor
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  #45  
Old December 27th, 2013, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertf View Post
You'll need some needle nose and snap ring pliers and a crescent or 2 to complete the home mechanic necessities. Harbor freight is good enough for that kind of stuff.
Not the snap ring pliers. I think I got two u-joint snap rings off before mine broke.
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  #46  
Old December 27th, 2013, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by C391HAT View Post
Not the snap ring pliers. I think I got two u-joint snap rings off before mine broke.
Funny, I was going to say that. Snap Ring Pliers are one of those things you really want a good set of. You can buy a really nice set for not too much money, look for a strong, well built set that has solid tips, not the junk interchangeable ones that slip in the clamps and aren't good for anything except relieving frustration when you throw them against a wall.

I would look for a rather basic set of Craftsman Sockets to start. Get a set with all or mostly 6pt in 1/4, 1/2 and 3/8 drive. Ideally you'll eventually have a set of deep and short of each in metric and sae, but just look for a set that has a lot of 6pt in each drive and deep as well as shallow. You can buy a few sets of deep or whatever are missing to fill in the gaps, but it's a good way to get a basic set started.

You'll want to get better ratchets, but the sockets are robust and inexpensive. I have a lot of wrenches, but at the time I bought them ACE had really comprehensive combination wrench sets for $20 with lifetime warranty...I've never broken one. You'll want a set of Gear Wrenches as well.

With respect to the comments on Snap-On Wrenches being narrow and hurting, so are mine as well as the professional Craftsman. I used to feel the same way, but just learned to use a rag, which you really should be doing anyway both for comfort and to protect your knuckles. The good thing is that being narrow, they fit places others don't, like the shaft of my die grinder to change the arbor. There are always trade-offs like with anything.

As far as socket storage, I currently use these plastic trays with spikes that hold each socket. They are great for organizing your box and inexpensive, but they don't travel. The second is a newer style that has been around for a few years. I'd like to get these in the future, but I thought I'd put them out here for people looking for something to travel. I don't know if they make smaller versions, but basically you put the socket on the peg (fits the drive size) and twist it 1/4 turn to lock it in. When they are locked in you can carry it around, flip it upside down, whatever, the sockets aren't going anywhere, just twist it back and lift it out when you need it.

Edit: I just saw these online too. A little pricey, but you couldn't ask for a better option for a travel kit!
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  #47  
Old December 27th, 2013, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by leastonce View Post
5'spark plug sockets??
I have 8 and none are duplicates.

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  #48  
Old December 27th, 2013, 10:33 AM
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My most frequently used tool is a hitachi 4.5 in grinder with cutting wheel

http://www.sears.com/hitachi-4-1-2-i...a=00922889000P

I have a dewalt version of the same tool with wire wheel on it for cleaning rust/scale

The hitachi is a much better tool than the dewalt.

As far as wrenches go I have some german heco and hazet tools from my bmw's and porsches that continue to surface as some of my favorites.
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  #49  
Old December 27th, 2013, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Douglas View Post
My most frequently used tool is a hitachi 4.5 in grinder with cutting wheel

http://www.sears.com/hitachi-4-1-2-i...a=00922889000P

I have a dewalt version of the same tool with wire wheel on it for cleaning rust/scale

The hitachi is a much better tool than the dewalt.

As far as wrenches go I have some german heco and hazet tools from my bmw's and porsches that continue to surface as some of my favorites.
I have that same one... it's around the same price on Amazon, but is Prime eligible so free 2 day shipping if you're a member.

It seems pretty well built, no complaints. Used it to cut all the poles at MAR this year, made quick work of it!
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  #50  
Old December 27th, 2013, 01:49 PM
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I work for Hitachi, but I don't currently have any hitachi tools.
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  #51  
Old December 27th, 2013, 05:26 PM
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Unless the quality of Craftsman has dropped off lately, you cannot beat those combination packages for the price. My complete set of Craftsman tools are 25 years young and still work great. Only over the last few years have I updated the wrenches, ratchets and drives to Craftsman's Professional line of tools. Much of the older stuff is now in a plastic kit under the D's passenger seat.
2x on the air compressor. 110v and 20-25 gal is more than enough.
No need to get caught up in the bling factor of a cordless 1/2" impact driver. That $$$$ can be better applied elsewhere, like Ingersoll Rand pneumatic 1/2" impact, 3/8" ratchet, and angle drill. Check Amazon for some amazing deals on the IR items. As with most, try to stay clear of their consumer grade items. And obviously, stay clear of Sear's several lines of gimmick tools like the "Universal Max", "Evolv", etc.
Sure, Snap-on is top shelf, but too $$$$ to warrant that kind of premium. Just look at the watch, shoe, and scotch threads to see the correlation.
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  #52  
Old December 27th, 2013, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Uncle Douglas View Post
My most frequently used tool is a hitachi 4.5 in grinder with cutting wheel
This also makes my 3 most used tools in my garage. I swap between a cutting wheel and flap discs. I do hate the power switch but it has ran for hundreds of flawless hours.

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  #53  
Old December 29th, 2013, 01:44 AM
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Originally Posted by javelinadave View Post
This also makes my 3 most used tools in my garage. I swap between a cutting wheel and flap discs. I do hate the power switch but it has ran for hundreds of flawless hours.

I just picked one up at Lowes for the same price. I'm excited to see how it performs after all the glowing recommendations.

For what it's worth, I got hyped up after this thread and the holiday sales and picked up another whole set of tools for my shop in the basement. I hate taking tools from place to place etc. so I wanted to have a decent set for home use, separate from my good stuff. I picked up a Kobalt set that looked pretty good, but once I looked closely I realized half the sockets were duplicates in 12pt and none of the 1/2 or deep 3/8 were 6pt either. Needless to say, I ended up returning it and just grabbing several sets of sockets rather than a kit.

From what I could see, you're better off going with Craftsman for a set, or just building a set from individual smaller sets so that you aren't getting so much useless crap. Basically, just look closely at what you are actually getting before you spend the money. I recall seeing two good looking Craftsman sets for under $200ea. Either would have been a great base to build from.

Oh, and Lowes has a killer deal on combination wrenches right now. I think its a 34 piece set for $39 o something crazy, I just bought them and they seem really nice!
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  #54  
Old December 29th, 2013, 02:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Jymmiejamz View Post
I have 8 and none are duplicates.

That's a gorgeous collection and cabinet. That green mica looks great.
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  #55  
Old December 29th, 2013, 07:24 AM
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Hi woody, as most have said buy a good brand with lifetime warranty, I started off buying snap-off's but after bruised fingers and smacked knuckles I learnt my lesson, my tools are now mostly Teng.
you may welll find many of the fasteners are AF rather than metric as LR had thousands of bolts to use up from group stores from the 70's

however for your ride I'd suggest the following specific tools:
A quality circlip plier set.
A wheel bearing locknut socket :http://www.lrseries.com/shop/product...spanner&page=1
A propshaft nut tool :http://www.lrseries.com/shop/product...%20tool&page=1
A quality grease gun that takes a standard cartridge - so much easier than trying to refill manually
A quality Impact driver or windy gun.
An oil pump for filling diffs/gearboxes I have an oil safe pump :http://www.oilsafesystem.com/oss-oil...dard-hand-pump

I also use the oil safe containers and pouring spouts for my oils.
these will make maintenance so much easier.

Regards All
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  #56  
Old December 29th, 2013, 07:53 AM
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Awesome info across the board. I really appreciate the help. Although it seems like tool brands are as personal an issue as there can be, I definitely take away the importance of warranty, basic quality and function. It seems like a first purchase is a good set of sockets (6 pt, 3/4 and 1/2 drive, SAE all being priority), combo and torque wrenches, and a BFH.

Keep the info coming. I can't have too much.

Thanks again,
Woody
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  #57  
Old December 29th, 2013, 09:29 AM
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That's a gorgeous collection and cabinet. That green mica looks great.
Thanks! I got lucky when I bought it. I found it on Craigslist in Long Island, NY full of tools. It was perfect for me starting out. I still have probably spent $10k on tools since purchasing this, but it had a lot of the basic stuff (mostly Snap On and some SK) when I bought it.
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  #58  
Old December 29th, 2013, 10:28 AM
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Awesome info across the board. I really appreciate the help. Although it seems like tool brands are as personal an issue as there can be, I definitely take away the importance of warranty, basic quality and function. It seems like a first purchase is a good set of sockets (6 pt, 3/4 and 1/2 drive, SAE all being priority), combo and torque wrenches, and a BFH. Keep the info coming. I can't have too much. Thanks again, Woody
You probably want 3/8 not 3/4 drive.

I have a single 3/4 socket for something but that's it. Mostly it's 3/8 and 1/2 for bigger stuff.
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  #59  
Old December 29th, 2013, 10:38 AM
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I haven't done this in a long time but if you know of a decent pawn shop they sometimes have a solid choices if you don't mind building as you go. I still have craftsman tools via pawn shop and when they break that way I have replacement options.

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  #60  
Old December 29th, 2013, 10:44 AM
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Earlier, I was saying that Craftsman, Kobalt etc., were terrible quality and while I stand by that statement, I also think if you're on,y using the tools occasionally, them they will be fine. In fact, they're a good value for somebody just getting started.
I was in Sears yesterday and wasn't all that impressed with the post Christmas sale on tools, although they did have a 300-pc mechanics tool set in an ABS plastic chest that was $199, marked down from $299. All the basics were there. Not a bad place to start for the OP.

I'm with Jason though when he says look for well used Snap-On sets on Craig's List. Especially boxes full of tools. Plenty of mechanics are simply giving up on the trade.
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