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  #1  
Old March 24th, 2007, 11:02 PM
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Davis M
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Tire Repair

I have a nail in a tire and a slow leak. My buddy loaned me a Safety Seal tire repair kit then took off on a trip. The instructions look simple but incomplete. Looks just like the tools/materials I've seen used at tire shops when I'm being lazy. I think ARB sells a similar kit. Anyone familiar with this product and if so, are there any tricks I should know about before I dive in? Seems like a good thing to have on board all the time and I might as well learn while off the trail rather than on. Also, can this kit repair a filled tire still on the vehicle or, do I need to remove and deflate. Thx.
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  #2  
Old March 24th, 2007, 11:19 PM
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shane cates
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Are you talking about a plug in the tire? I've got a pickup with probably a dozen plugs and is fine. Or are you talking about a patch for the inside of the tire? A plug kit is a must in every car for me as I build houses and am always picking up nails. I also carry a small air tank in every car. Soon to have built in air on the d90.

Follow-up Post:

If it is a plug kit, you ream the hole with the included tool, then put the black slimy thing (the plug) through the tool with the hole in it so it is somewhat centered. Then push it into the hole in the tire and remove it. Drive and then use a little soapy water and look for bubbles. Then try to keep the Defender under 100mph. (lol)

sorry if this is not what you are after.
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  #3  
Old March 24th, 2007, 11:21 PM
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Here's what you do:

1. Put down the repair kit.
2. Fill up your tire
3. Drive to Discount Tire
4. Get tire repaired for free
5. Save the kit for the trail

Hope that helps. If you are still bent on fixing it yourself, its pretty much just like the bedroom. You grab your junk, put some lube on it, find the hole, shove it in. Be sure the pat the tire gently and promise to call it tomarrow and your done.

Good luck.
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  #4  
Old March 24th, 2007, 11:23 PM
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shane cates
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckon37s
Here's what you do:

1. Put down the repair kit.
2. Fill up your tire
3. Drive to Discount Tire
4. Get tire repaired for free
5. Save the kit for the trail

Hope that helps. If you are still bent on fixing it yourself, its pretty much just like the bedroom. You grab your junk, put some lube on it, find the hole, shove it in. Be sure the pat the tire gently and promise to call it tomarrow and your done.

Good luck.
True! Ha
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  #5  
Old March 25th, 2007, 01:18 AM
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Yup, thanks. That's exactly the type of repair kit I've got. Thought I'd skip the tire shop so I can learn how to use the kit. Better to learn off trail so I can look like a pro on trail. Can I perform the repair on an inflated tire? Or, do I need to remove wheel/tire and deflate?
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  #6  
Old March 25th, 2007, 01:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis M
Yup, thanks. That's exactly the type of repair kit I've got. Thought I'd skip the tire shop so I can learn how to use the kit. Better to learn off trail so I can look like a pro on trail. Can I perform the repair on an inflated tire? Or, do I need to remove wheel/tire and deflate?
You can do it with the tire inflated and on the truck. It actually makes it easier to get the plug in.
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  #7  
Old March 25th, 2007, 01:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis M
. . . Anyone familiar with this product and if so, are there any tricks I should know about before I dive in? Seems like a good thing to have on board all the time and I might as well learn while off the trail rather than on. Also, can this kit repair a filled tire still on the vehicle or, do I need to remove and deflate. Thx.
I have used the Safety Seal kit before. Here's my procedure for fixing the tire while on the vehicle, without even jacking the tire off the ground. For a tire with a slow leak as you described: first, drive the vehicle forward or backward so that the puncture is oriented at 4 o'clock or 8 o'clock, so you will have room to work. If the tire is low, fill it. Get everything ready - put some lube on the reaming tool, thread a plug into the insertion needle so that half the plug is on either side of the needle, and lube the end of the needle. If there is a nail, screw, or other malefactor still in the puncture, pull it out. Take the reamer, twist it into the hole, and give it several more twists once it's in. Don't be shy. If you don't do a good job reaming out the hole, it will be tougher to get the plug in. Pull the reamer out. The hole will be bigger now, and air will hiss out much more quickly, so without delay, take the insertion needle and push it into the hole until it bottoms out on the sliding sleeve. Hold the sleeve against the tire with one hand, and pull the insertion needle out of the tire with the other. Voila. The hole is sealed. Some of the plug will be outside the hole. Use a knife or razor blade to trim the plug flush with the tread, or even closer to the casing if your tire tread permits.

I would consider this type of repair to be permanent. If the puncture is so large that it requires multiple plugs, or if it is in a sidewall, get off the trail and have the tire professionally repaired (or in the case of a sidewall puncture, replaced) at the earliest opportunity.

There are several versions of the Safety Seal kit, so before you buy one, be sure that it is appropriate for SUV tires.

Expedition Exchange carries both the ARB kit and the Safety Seal kit. The ARB kit seems to be a better value, as it includes a tire pressure gauge, a valve stem tool, and some valve stems. I have no personal experience with the ARB kit.

There's my 2. Hope that helps. Cheers!
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  #8  
Old March 25th, 2007, 01:56 AM
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Thanks guys. Exactly what I needed!
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  #9  
Old December 27th, 2008, 12:53 PM
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Thumbs up

I just performed a very simple tire repair on my wife's RR Sport with the ARB Tire Repair kit... couldnt have been easier.

However, the last word on the instructions was somthing to the effect that "this is only a temporary repair -- take your tire to a professional repair facility as soon as possible".

After a little research it appears that tire repair shops use the exact same method. Anyone here want to offer their opinion:

Have it "professionally" re-done, or leave it as is?
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  #10  
Old December 27th, 2008, 03:38 PM
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Taking the tire you repaired to a tire shop and having in repaired "professionally" shifts liability from ARB to the tire repair facility.

If the hole you repaired could be sealed with a single plug, and it's on the tread rather than the sidewall, you're good to go. Keep an eye on it for a couple of weeks just to make sure it's holding air. I have lots of plugs in my tires and not one has leaked. (Except the first one I did, which I botched. Reading the instructions before attempting the repair is always advisable.)
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  #11  
Old December 29th, 2008, 03:14 PM
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From what a tire shop guy told me, it is okay to use plugs within the area of the tread pattern. But sidewalls (meaning not within the tread area) require replacing the tire. Big O Tires gives you a free tire with any sidewall puncture if you purchase the BIG O Brand
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  #12  
Old December 29th, 2008, 03:52 PM
agavelvr

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigd
From what a tire shop guy told me, it is okay to use plugs within the area of the tread pattern. But sidewalls (meaning not within the tread area) require replacing the tire. Big O Tires gives you a free tire with any sidewall puncture if you purchase the BIG O Brand
It's actually not too difficult to repair a significant sidewall tear in the field compared to most mechanical repairs. The hard part is breaking the bead and reseting the tire. Having the right tools helps.

http://www.adventuretrailers.com/tirerepair.html

Martyn at Adventure Trailer did a really detailed repair clinic at the Expedition Trophy this past October. He posted a tutorial on how to do it all at the link above. It took us about an hour of class time to do the full repair of a 4" slash in the sidewall. It's really not that difficult compared to other disasters that need repair on the trail. I recommend practicing at home to get the hang of it for sure though. Get a beat up tire and rim to practice on.

I bought the ARB tire repair kit and it works well for small punctures. I'll be upgrading to AT's kit in the near future as insurance against larger problems.

hope it helps,
Jeff
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