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  #1  
Old February 24th, 2005, 11:26 AM
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Paul / Boultbee
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snow chains and 4x4 Best way.

Going to the mountains this weekend - lots of snow.
Manditory snow chains for all vehicles, I will be buying 2.
That is a 1st for me & I've never really thought about this before and I've never put chains on a 4x4.
So what is best..
- chains on the front and keep diff open so 2 wheel drive
- chains on the front & 4 wheel drive?
- other set up?
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  #2  
Old February 24th, 2005, 11:50 AM
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5psi 3rd low and boot it


Quote:
Originally Posted by paulb
Going to the mountains this weekend - lots of snow.
Manditory snow chains for all vehicles, I will be buying 2.
That is a 1st for me & I've never really thought about this before and I've never put chains on a 4x4.
So what is best..
- chains on the front and keep diff open so 2 wheel drive
- chains on the front & 4 wheel drive?
- other set up?
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  #3  
Old February 24th, 2005, 11:52 AM
javelinadave
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Chains up front and 4wd. I have tried them both ways on a Blazer.
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  #4  
Old February 24th, 2005, 12:18 PM
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Scott
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Depending on the snow either low psi (for new deep stuff), or 4 chains, one on each wheel.
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  #5  
Old February 24th, 2005, 12:28 PM
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speaking of chains... Where is the best palce to source them? I figure it'd probably be wise to own a set.
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  #6  
Old February 24th, 2005, 12:33 PM
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David Marchand
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Locally to you, I'd call Bill and Rachel Burke (www.bb4wa.com) to get your chains. I'd recommend getting 4 and not just two. More control. And you can never have enough.
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  #7  
Old February 24th, 2005, 01:38 PM
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Paul / Boultbee
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Thanks to all.
This is utility road usage only so I'm only going for 2.
Then again, I have left it late and NOONE has chains for mystock LT265/75R16 s so...

There goes the afternoon hunting.
My local car stores really do suck (small limited stock & really rude)

And damn, i wish I had thought about Bill's stuff earlier. Now I am really upset at myself.
Good side, I did sign up for his mailers. Looking to go hiking the Grand Canyon in September, so maybe add to the trip - an excuse to drive LA - Grand Canyon.
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  #8  
Old February 24th, 2005, 07:45 PM
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Two chains are fine.

Always put them on the REAR. It is much safer. The vehicle is much more stable. In an emergency situation, chains on the front will cause vehicle instability and lead to a crash. In addition, the front axles on ALL Rovers is not strong enough for chain use, so 4 chains should not be used UNLESS you have serious upgrades on the front axle.

You can believe all of these other guys, but we actually use chains regularly for 6 months of the year.

In addition, I would suggest airing down on both ends if they are actually needed (not just mandated) for traction. Our normal setup in the winter (off road) is chains on the rear and aired down to the lowest safe pressure.
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  #9  
Old February 25th, 2005, 06:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red90
In addition, I would suggest airing down on both ends if they are actually needed (not just mandated) for traction. Our normal setup in the winter (off road) is chains on the rear and aired down to the lowest safe pressure.
Wow, aired down with chains? I've heard that is a bad idea from multiple sources. One reasoning is that as the tire rotates its shape changes causing the chains to move. They can eventually come off and/or wrap around the axle.
As for 2 vs. 4 - growing up we only used one set of chains on the back. I used them one time on ice and heard I should have put the one set up front. Another comment - 4 tires 4 chains. I guess it depends on how strong you think the drive train is and how likely you will see it bind up.
ymmv.
-scott
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  #10  
Old February 25th, 2005, 08:51 AM
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David Marchand
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I guess differing opinions abound.

I would not suggest airing down with chains, as Scott was to the point.

And I believe your better off with four than two. Two reasons, first I agree the rear should be chained first, but that leaves you without steering. That's kind of important.

Two, inevitably, your going to break a chain. It happens more than it should. All it takes is for a chain to loosen, and wrap in one revolution. Or a solid connection with a rock. In breaking that chain, I'd rather have the set of two left, than none.

But walking out of the woods isn't bad either.
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  #11  
Old February 25th, 2005, 12:09 PM
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As I stated, around here we use chains off road for half the year. So my advice is not speculation, it is from a lot of real life experience. Airing down substantially increases traction. There is no problem with chains and airing down. I like to make sure your chains are tight as they run a lot quieter and smoother. I use cam locks as they are quick and easy. I can mount the pair in less than 5 minutes. I've seen many run them loose though without any problems.

Here is a pic

You should not be breaking chains unless you buy junk. Reall chains are serious items and are very strong.

Again, do NOT run them on the front of a stock Rover. You will break the CVs. Seriously. Chains provide very large amounts of traction. There is no problem with steering with only the rear chained up, just make sure the fronts are PROPERLY aired down. In fact, if you are stock in the rear, be VERY careful with the go pedal.

The dicussion above is mainly for off road use, in the winter on ice. The trails around here become skating rinks for a lot of the winter.

IME, it is pretty rare that chains are needed on a road. If it is just for the mandated on road use at a ski resort or such, I would get a pair of cable chains and fit them to the rear. They are quieter and smoother and will provide more than enough traction for road conditions.
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  #12  
Old February 25th, 2005, 01:55 PM
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Having used chains a lot, I have to agree with John but what kind of chains will dictate what you do. If you're running the heavy duty ones then you're not supposed to go fast anyhow so airing down is fine, just make sure you re-tighten them after a few hundred meters. I've only seen chains come off when people don't check and re-tighten.

The only time you may need chains on the front is if you're on a skating rink, in snow the front tires are just nice big rudders and will steer you no problem.

For higher speeds you should be using the cable type chains, but I've never botherd because aired down tires work almost as well and cable style have a habit of not lasting very long and doing damage when they snap. With these I may be inclined to not air down.

I was driving around on snow covered logging roads last week, it was cold enough for the ski doo routes to be hard enough that my truck wasn't sinking. I didn't bother to air down and was fine
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  #13  
Old February 27th, 2005, 02:26 AM
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Do you really need chains? Here in Oregon, 4x4's are exempt from chain requirements. The only time they're not is a "conditional road closure", which is pretty rare.

On the trails, though, we use chains on all 4 to get through the 2 foot deep stuff. But on pavement, almost never.
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  #14  
Old February 28th, 2005, 01:44 PM
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Here in California seems you need chains when they tell you so. Well, went to the hills and looking at the roads, chains were not needed and even with snow, I think 4x4 would have been OK. All I can figure is its a blanket rule cause people do not know how to drive in the white stuff. In Michigan (much more snow) did not need them.
Hey, RED90, John I saw a bit on a local rebroadcast of the Sunday CBC news program where they had a Fin (i.e a dude from Finland) just busting on the Canadians and their winter ways. He was asking how a country with snow at least 4 month a year could drive on all weather tires without studs (he asked a half dozen people). He was comparing Finland to Canada and it was a riot. He hit driving, clothes, and of course sauna usage.

Txs all for the help.
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  #15  
Old February 28th, 2005, 01:51 PM
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I heard about that, and agree fully. All my daily drivers have proper winter tires, but I am a very small minority. It makes winter driving much more enjoyable. You are not worried about ever being out of control.

These are on the Jetta at the moment

I don't have winter tires on the 90, but I do not drive it normally. I'd get some studded 10LTs if I did.
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