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  #1  
Old December 10th, 2008, 02:53 PM
cneal
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Charles Neal
97 d-90, 99 & 04 disco's
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rear trailing links

I recently upgraded the suspension on my 97 d-90 to OME heavy duty springs and shocks. My axel castor (front and back) is now off. I have noticed that many of you have installed new rear trailing links (RoverTym or other) to correct the back axel. My question(s) is why do the back only? If I do the front and back will I need to get new drive shafts? What other affect will this have on my vehicle?

I use the d-90 for overland travel only.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old December 10th, 2008, 03:08 PM
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Andrew Najarian
'93 NAS D110 #43
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You shouldn't need anything else. From what I have read, the rear tends to act up before the front, but I have to admit, it has always puzzled me as it seems the front should be affected most since the shaft is shorter.

Hopefully someone else can chime in and answer that for both of us.
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  #3  
Old December 10th, 2008, 03:13 PM
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Scott
1997 D90 ST #1444
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I would do them both... If you only went up 2 inches, you will be fine with the stock Drive Shafts.
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  #4  
Old December 10th, 2008, 03:32 PM
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Daniel Marcello
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you can also get the RoverTym A-arm extension. that wil bring the castor back. You should be fine with stock driveshafts.

My understanding why the rear gets vibs instead of the front is because the rear trailing arms have one link each to the axle housing. so when you lift the rear the castor of your axle stays the same yet your two end points of your rear drive shaft (diff & transfer case) have more of an angle to them now. The front radius arms have two links each to the front axle, so when you lift it that castor of the axle goes with the angle of the radius arms so the front drive shaft isn't as effected.

So say you put a 10 inch lift on the front (for demonstration only!!!) the only angle that will be really effected is the drive shaft end on the transfer case and obviously the radius arms/frame connection.
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  #5  
Old December 10th, 2008, 03:47 PM
cneal
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Charles Neal
97 d-90, 99 & 04 disco's
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I only have about a 2.5 inch lift. I have noticed that the rear has a more "ridged" ride than it did before. I just don't want to start down a road that will cost me more $$ and time.

Which links do you like best: RoverTym, Rockware, Rovertrack?

Will I need to do anything with my pan hard rod?

Thanks.

Follow-up Post:

Daniel, thanks for the info. Makes more since to me know. What affect will this have on my articulation? Will I need to consider dislocation hardware?
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  #6  
Old December 10th, 2008, 03:47 PM
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S. Smith
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I have a 4" lift on my RRC and got a new adjustable panhard rod and was very bummed when I went to put it on and it was too long. I put the factory one back on and it works like a champ. Unless you are getting really freaky with a huge lift your panhard rod should be fine. If you just have to mess with it I have one for cheap.
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  #7  
Old December 10th, 2008, 04:15 PM
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Keith Kreutzer
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I like Rovertracks

Seriously with a 2.5" lift you might get away with the front caster being off, you'll know if it wanders all over the road. The front driveshafts IME don't tend to Vibe alot until about a 3.5-4" lift.

An A Arm Extension will nessesitate the use of a Double cardon Rear Driveshaft in many cases due to the driveshaft geometry, I avoid them in the rear at all costs.

In all likelyhood you need the axle pushed back at the bottom just a touch.
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  #8  
Old December 10th, 2008, 05:24 PM
cneal
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Charles Neal
97 d-90, 99 & 04 disco's
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This is what I have done to the D-90 so far:

OME 751 springs front
OME 764 springs rear
n115 shocks front
n44 shocks rear
Land Rover rubberized spring isolators front and rear (have not used these before)
Land Rover rubberized shock tower securing rings front
Expeditionware spring retainers rear

All purchased from Expedition Exchange.

Looking to make this vehicle as simple and reliable as possible.
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  #9  
Old December 10th, 2008, 06:15 PM
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Phillip
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Ive got the Rovertracks rear links, helped my vibes but moved the axle back quite a bit.
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  #10  
Old December 10th, 2008, 07:04 PM
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Charles Galpin
'94 D90 ST, '63 SeriesIIA
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Keith, are all the rear links longer or did you have ask for them to be longer? I have a set and honestly don't recall noticing them being longer. I like to think I would have noticed that when I installed them, but then again..
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  #11  
Old December 11th, 2008, 11:13 AM
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Keith Kreutzer
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Hey Charles

Yes they are a bit longer, 110's are different from 90' as are D1' and RRC's. Each gets a little different extension.
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  #12  
Old December 11th, 2008, 11:29 AM
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Charles Galpin
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Well, I'm happy with mine so enough said!
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