Question: Rear Crossmember - powdercoat ? - Page 2 - Defender Source
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  #21  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 05:18 PM
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Scott Pelly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red90 View Post
The problem with this thread is that "powder coating" is like saying "painting". There is a large range of materials, application procedures and preparation that could be used.

Regardless a rear crossmember rusts from the inside out, so not coating the inside will end up rusting out.
Agreed.

And to the original question.... no I wouldn't powder coat the crossmember. Weld it on, paint and protect the welds, keep it clean and protected with a corrosion preventative coating.
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  #22  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 06:02 PM
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So all these full galvy chassis swaps are a bad idea?
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  #23  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij View Post
For an exterior fence sure, for a rover rear crossmember?

I don't disagree, my only point was that Powder Coating over Galvanized steel is done every day.
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  #24  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 06:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wcampbel@nas.edu View Post
So all these full galvy chassis swaps are a bad idea?
Fully galvanized chassis swaps are well worth it, but welding on a galvanized crossmember to a non galvanized frame isn't the best route to go.
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  #25  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CDN38 View Post
Fully galvanized chassis swaps are well worth it, but welding on a galvanized crossmember to a non galvanized frame isn't the best route to go.
So being that I was planning on doing exactly that what is the best route? Really the only thing that bad on my truck is the rusted rear crossmember.
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  #26  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 07:39 PM
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Weld on a non galvanized crossmember, paint protect the welds, keep it clean and protected with a corrosion preventative coating.
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  #27  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 08:40 PM
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Isnt that kind of just like welding on a galvy one? I mean I will protect the welds and the galvy is corrosion resistant.
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  #28  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 08:50 PM
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There is no issue with welding on a galvanized crossmember to a non-galvanized frame. All you need to do is make sure you grind off the galvanizing where you weld it to the frame. To put it in perspective, I have seen trucks that has non-galvanized crossmembers welded on where the new crossmember rots out, but I have not seen a galvanized one rot out. Really the only "issue" with galvanizing is getting paint to sick long term. But all the cool kids have galvanized frames these days and I have always thought it was a good look (at least since I put a galvanized frame in my series 18 years ago).
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  #29  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 08:54 PM
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Ya I would love to do a full galvy frame but alas I have budget constraints.
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  #30  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wcampbel@nas.edu View Post
Ya I would love to do a full galvy frame but alas I have budget constraints.
Just buy a galvanized replacement crossmember and weld it on. While the ends of the frame are cut off, vacuum out the inside of any debris and when the welding is done, paint where it was welded and spray some waxoyl in the chassis to keep it solid. BTW the other big rust failure point is where the transmission crossmember mounts to the chassis so if you are doing welding, I would pull that and look for rot behind it and fix as needed.
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  #31  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 09:22 PM
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That was the plan until I read this thread.
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  #32  
Old September 2nd, 2016, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij View Post
There is no issue with welding on a galvanized crossmember to a non-galvanized frame. All you need to do is make sure you grind off the galvanizing where you weld it to the frame. To put it in perspective, I have seen trucks that has non-galvanized crossmembers welded on where the new crossmember rots out, but I have not seen a galvanized one rot out. Really the only "issue" with galvanizing is getting paint to sick long term. But all the cool kids have galvanized frames these days and I have always thought it was a good look (at least since I put a galvanized frame in my series 18 years ago).
Agreed, but why put on a crossmember that will last forever (well, a long long long time) on a frame that won't? If you don't grind off ALL the galv on the inside, and outside of the weld you will compromise the weld integrity. (and that's removing it a ways back, zinc has a much lower melting point than steel) Go with the standard steel, and save up your $ for the long term solution of doing the frame if you plan on long term ownership. A regular steel replacement crossmember should last 20 years if you look after it. By then, you'll be ready for a full galv frame.

As for painting on galv, procedure is PPG DX579 Metal Cleaner, followed by DX520 Metal Conditioner. These are specifically for cleaning and conditioning steel and galvanized surfaces for maximum paint adhesion and corrosion resistance.

http://www.txrv10.com/media/pdf-docs/PPG%20System.pdf

I used these 2 prep chemicals when I painted my galvanized side frames. Primed, painted and works like a charm.
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  #33  
Old September 3rd, 2016, 12:47 AM
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Originally Posted by CDN38 View Post
Agreed, but why put on a crossmember that will last forever (well, a long long long time) on a frame that won't? If you don't grind off ALL the galv on the inside, and outside of the weld you will compromise the weld integrity. (and that's removing it a ways back, zinc has a much lower melting point than steel) Go with the standard steel, and save up your $ for the long term solution of doing the frame if you plan on long term ownership. A regular steel replacement crossmember should last 20 years if you look after it. By then, you'll be ready for a full galv frame. As for painting on galv, procedure is PPG DX579 Metal Cleaner, followed by DX520 Metal Conditioner. These are specifically for cleaning and conditioning steel and galvanized surfaces for maximum paint adhesion and corrosion resistance. http://www.txrv10.com/media/pdf-docs/PPG%20System.pdf I used these 2 prep chemicals when I painted my galvanized side frames. Primed, painted and works like a charm.
Replacement crossmembers are generally made of crap steel and have crap paint on them so you might be in the situation where you have to replace it again before the frame goes. I mean it is really a terrible design with sandwiched metal that is in the direct path of the rear tires. Plus when your frame goes you can sell the galvanized crossmember to someone else. But in any event, YMMV.
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  #34  
Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:47 AM
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Ya the rest of the frame looks pretty solid, even leading up to the crossmember itself. It's just the crossmember is falling apart. I bought it in 1997 and drove it daily until 2010. Since 2010 it has been parked in garage and I have been doing several things to it. It is finally up and running well and my last major effort was going to be the rear crossmember. I was hoping that and doing some chassis black on the rest of the frame would last me another 20.
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  #35  
Old September 3rd, 2016, 08:41 AM
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If you must have a black chassis, Eastwood Chassis Black Xtreme--despite the awful name--is the way to go. It's expensive but it does a fantastic job. I've painted my axle tubes and links with it and it really holds up. Very hard to chip of properly prepped and applied. To prep, it's best to apply to blasted metal. Etch with a good metal etching solution (not over your nice concrete floors...) and paint on a warm day.
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  #36  
Old September 3rd, 2016, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by chris snell View Post
If you must have a black chassis, Eastwood Chassis Black Xtreme--despite the awful name--is the way to go. It's expensive but it does a fantastic job. I've painted my axle tubes and links with it and it really holds up. Very hard to chip of properly prepped and applied. To prep, it's best to apply to blasted metal. Etch with a good metal etching solution (not over your nice concrete floors...) and paint on a warm day.
I dont care about it being black, just protected. Unlikely I will have it blasted first. They can't do that with it intact right? I was figuring wire wheel and just grinding as much crap off as possible.
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  #37  
Old September 3rd, 2016, 12:05 PM
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If you want the underside cleaned and protected properly, you need to start by putting it on a hoist, spray the underside with a de-greaser and then hot water pressure wash the underside. As well, you need to completely flush out the inside of the frame rails. There are a lot of out of the way places packed with mud, road grime and other things that will prevent proper adhesion of any preventative treatment you try to use.

https://youtu.be/dDl6CDjW0KI

I have done the Dinitrol treatment on 5 Defenders over the last year. Amazing stuff, but its a lot of work to do the whole process.
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