POR-15 Rust Abatement - Page 2 - Defender Source
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  #21  
Old September 25th, 2012, 01:24 PM
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I'm not an expert but i use WD40 everywhere. I soak the inside and outside of the frame 2x a year. I figure it helps remove moisture inside. I like that it does not cover shit up and after being off road the dirt and mud wash off very easily without high pressure washing. My frame still looks new and my rear cross does too.

Clay
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  #22  
Old September 25th, 2012, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1of40 View Post
I'm not an expert but i use WD40 everywhere. I soak the inside and outside of the frame 2x a year. I figure it helps remove moisture inside. I like that it does not cover shit up and after being off road the dirt and mud wash off very easily without high pressure washing. My frame still looks new and my rear cross does too.

Clay
I did that as well, but as it has been explained to me (and makes sense) WD-40 just evaporates and leaves maybe a bit of film. Yes it does displace water (hence its name), but what you're talking about is essentially an expensive way to dry your frame after getting it wet. it does absolutely nothing to protect exposed metal.
I'm not shooting your idea down because I had done the same thing, but when people smarter than me made me actually think about what WD-40 is and what I was trying to acheive, it all sounded silly.

The whole point of POR-15 vs. Waxoil is that Waxoil is a miserable D-bag to work with and hides more than it protects. POR-15 would really encapsulate any flaking. I would still do a used motor oil and very little waxoil INSIDE the frame as a way of keeping a greasy water repelent inside the frame at all times. I suppose one could apply (spray) POR-15 inside the frame in a same manner that Waxoil and used motor oil is applied (via a mist).

My point of this thread is to figure out what a realistic expectation of hours would be to drop the axles, fuel tank to access and treat/spray the frame and supports. I'm getting a bit balky when the guys suggests it's going to cost $2,000-$2,500 and my frame is pretty decent to begin with (see pics).

And yes, to evifig's point an application of Waxoil would be a fine solution. I just wanted to do somthing a bit better and more robust (Waxoil needs to be reapplied every year it seems)
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  #23  
Old September 25th, 2012, 02:46 PM
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wd40 is working for me but probably because i started the treatment before there was no turning back. that's also because dry chassis is my objective. i think that's why southern vehilces typically carry higher values. waxoyl or por-15 on my chassis would make it look/feel like there is something to hide which ends up depleting my vehicle's value

clay
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  #24  
Old September 25th, 2012, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by 1of40 View Post
waxoyl or por-15 on my chassis would make it look/feel like there is something to hide which ends up depleting my vehicle's value

clay

I agree 100% There are some people/"dealers" who try and sell a lot of imported trucks and think they are doing people a favor by spraying undercoating or other stuff on everything. If there is nothing to hide then leave as is and be honest about your product. Offer the ugly messy coverup as an option so a potential buyer can see the TRUE condition. Hiding poor quality/incorrect procedure welds and rust is is the work of a hack not a respected seller and aids in the deception of those who may not know exactly what to look for.

All the nasty cover ups reminds me of the saying "Putty and paint makes a welder what he aint"
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  #25  
Old September 25th, 2012, 03:09 PM
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Replace "WD-40" with "Boeshield"
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  #26  
Old September 25th, 2012, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by broadstone View Post
I agree 100% There are some people/"dealers" who try and sell a lot of imported trucks and think they are doing people a favor by spraying undercoating or other stuff on everything. If there is nothing to hide then leave as is and be honest about your product. Offer the ugly messy coverup as an option so a potential buyer can see the TRUE condition. Hiding poor quality/incorrect procedure welds and rust is is the work of a hack not a respected seller and aids in the deception of those who may not know exactly what to look for.

All the nasty cover ups reminds me of the saying "Putty and paint makes a welder what he aint"
Yep, I agree Waxoil is the Defender equivalent of frame Bondo in that it hides bad things. POR-15 doesn't really hide anything as much as it bonds/encapsulates.
@1 of 40-I think spraying w/WD-40 is better than nothing, but it just evaporates and would not be effective in salty environments where the water may have been displaced but the salt remains.
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  #27  
Old September 25th, 2012, 04:14 PM
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If you want to soak the inside of the chassis, there are "proper" materials that convert the rust and protect against corrosion.

Something like Rust Check or similar product makes sense over WD-40 or Waxoil.
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  #28  
Old September 25th, 2012, 07:24 PM
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Don Bunnell
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I've used Waxoyl's cavity/inside rattle cans on the inside of my frame and have POR-15 on the outside and top coated the POR-15 with their Chassis Black. I have only done the rear most part when I had the axle out last fall. Looking to do the front axle this fall and the front part of the frame. When I get around to rebuilding my sliders and/or replace the tranny I will do the center most part.

I agree with Red90 that POR-15 isn't the miracle solution but it has been decent for me. I prepped the metal as best I could using the POR-15 instructions and things looked like that came out well. I think POR-15 sticks better to rusty surfaces vs. bare metal. I just wanted the frame to look better and be able to clean quickly.

I also agree with everyone that the black Waxoyl on the outside looks like shit and looks like it collects more dirt and grim then anything else. I saw one truck years ago that had everything done - shocks, springs, frame and just looked like a mess.

Red90 - I have about 2-3 applications of the cavity Waxoyl. Might be interested in trying the Rust Check product out - having the Waxoyl already inside would it be worthless to give it a shot?

Jackie - that frame looks real good in the pics. At the $2,000 estimate I'd might even say clean up the rust areas and use something like POR-15 Marine clean, then a good spray primer followed by semi-gloss black spray paint. I did my A-arms like this with Rustoleum spray stuff when they were out for the axle and they came out just as good as the POR-15/chassis black stuff and seem to be as durable. Was less cost and easier to work with. Then use the $1,800 or so you have left over and put it in the galvy chassis fund for a few years down the road.
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  #29  
Old September 29th, 2012, 04:59 PM
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Por-15

I have done my whole truck with por 15, be careful with the wire brush they actually polish the metal to the point POR does not grab as well as sanded metal rusted. Ospho is great to convert rust assuming you are sure to dilute properly & clean before painting.
I sanded the whole thing as I had things apart, bigest thing with POR is get off the oil & grease.
As some one else mentioned marine clean does that well. I really do not know why you would want to spray por better to soak up the spots needed with a brush.
Then of course my truck has not gone far from my garage yet.
But it all seems to be holding up well.
get some jacks remove one end of shocks & other bits save that 2,000$ for something needed.
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  #30  
Old September 29th, 2012, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn
So, after owning my current 110 for nearly a year and having plenty of time to analyze what it needs I have decided to address some corrosion issues.

The frame was repaired pretty extensively along with new TD5 crossmember in 2007 along with tub supports and other things. Five years later and I want to address minor rust issues before they become bigger. The frame and everything around it is in pretty solid shape (we spent about 45 minutes going over every bit of metal with a tack hammer and only fond one soft spot where the frame rail connects to the rear crossmember)

I may waxoil at some later point, but for the purposes of his discussion I want to get some input on inplace sandblasting and treatment with POR-15.

I have a local shop who would be capable of removing the axles, springs, fuel tank, bump stops and other stuff to get pretty good access to mosty of the frame. I have a few questions all of which probably have endless outcomes/answers, but looking to hear what some people have to say (that actually did something similar).

1) how much time is usually involved in removing and replacing both axles and springs (spring perches left in place)? assuming competent mechanic in full shop with lift.

2) notwithstanding any metal work/patching, how many hours could you reasonably see somebody sandblasting away the corrosion (not down to bare metal) everywhere on the bits of frame, crossmembers and tub supports that are exposed? 20-30 hours? 30-40 hours?

I think question #1 would be easy for many of you to answer, I understand question #2 is difficult, but looking for educated stabs.

I'll sent pictures before and after, but I think 1 coat of spray POR-15 with 2-coats of satin black would do wonders rather than covering up minor corrosion with Waxoil like they do in the UK. Wouldn't it be great if we coudl drive a Defender into a giant vat of POR-15 and abate surface rust easily as that? obviously a silly proposition, but just looking for a middle of the road solution between Waxoil applications every year and a new frame in five years.

It's in great shape now, but trying to keep it that way because it's a slippery slope once you see the orange!
If you spend so much time and money on it for a mechanic. Why not get a galvinized chassis? Worry free for the rest of your defender life.
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  #31  
Old September 29th, 2012, 06:50 PM
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A couple of quarts of used oil 2x a year. go buy yourself a Schutz gun, I use bar oil, used motor oil and Marvel Mystery oil.. I don't see why some beeswax couldn't be tossed in also. I used it for a few years on my RR Classic, daily driver here in MA, did a great job, it was relatively free, the Schutz gun kinda foams it out, and it was thick enough that it didn't run and make a mess everywhere, plus it creeps into every crack and crevice, which waxoyl and POR 15 won't. I have access to waxoyl and am debating using it on my Series frame, I am probably just going to oil it regularly because I'm cheap. I would save the effort and pennies for a galvy swap if I were you. POR 15 is pretty nasty stuff, as I understand if not prepped properly a bear to live with, but I've never used it so can't agree either way with that statement.

Although I might be going with Fluid film.. looks like the bees knees.

http://www.fluid-film.com/
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