Packing the Hub bearings - Defender Source
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  #1  
Old May 20th, 2008, 05:19 PM
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Stephan Laputka
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Packing the Hub bearings

I'm doing some maintenance on the front end.. Checked the hubs and seals and everything was chocolate brown and rusted. I decided to change it all out and my question is about where to apply grease. Is simply packing the bearings enough? I was gonna get into the hubs with brake cleaner an give it a good clean. Do I need to slap grease onto the races and surrounding area as well or just leave it be with well greased bearings?
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  #2  
Old May 20th, 2008, 05:32 PM
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Daniel Marcello
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I put a little grease on the hub stub where the rubber seal will push up against. not a lot but a little. Then pack grease into the bearings with a universal bearing packer. Pound the new races in and grease them and put the inner bearing in and slide that onto the hub while trying to hold it center. After that load grease into the gap between the inner bearing and where the outer bearing will go. I found out that a thin paint brush gets it in there nicely. Then put the outer bearing s into the race and put the large washer on after to hold it in place. Try to push the washer and whole hub up against the hub stub as far as you can. You know the rest.
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  #3  
Old May 21st, 2008, 08:59 AM
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Stephan Laputka
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Is it very important to change the race everytime? I'm not changing the bearings, just repacking them. I hate pounding out the races.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 10:32 AM
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Daniel Marcello
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If I have a new set of bearings I will replace the races too. That is if you have the time and all. I agree the races do suck to pound out and then back in. One time I was pressed for time and I burned the bearings out bad. I took them out and felt the races and they were still smooth so I just put in the new bearings. I'm sure you would be fine just repacking them and using the same bearings and races.
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  #5  
Old May 21st, 2008, 10:42 AM
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I would replace them if they were rusty and contaminated, but otherwise at least wash them out with some mineral spirits in a coffee can and dry them before repacking so you get rid of the bad grease.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 11:09 AM
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How much "shop time" would you guys estimate this job takes - done right per side?
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Old May 21st, 2008, 11:11 AM
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LOL, I use a coffee can too. Usually Tim Horton's.

And whatever you do, when drying out the bearing, DO NOT use a compressed air line to spin the bearing *even though* it makes a REALLY COOL noise that sounds like...well, sounds like a bearing being spun by a compressed air line. No. Nope. Never do that. Ever. Because That Would Be Really Dangerous. And Stupid. Seriously.


Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinNY
I would replace them if they were rusty and contaminated, but otherwise at least wash them out with some mineral spirits in a coffee can and dry them before repacking so you get rid of the bad grease.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 11:59 AM
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Daniel Marcello
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1of40
How much "shop time" would you guys estimate this job takes - done right per side?
If its your first time and you had all the tools and you got right into it I would say maybe an hour for one wheel? One time I had to go get a hub abstracter at Autozone because the hub wouldn't come off so that took some time...or the race is being difficult and not going in easy, which all add a bit of time, but if you are not rushing and going at your own pace I would say an hour for one. Drink beer and play classic rock when you do them too.
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  #9  
Old May 21st, 2008, 04:23 PM
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Stephan Laputka
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I work really slow when it comes to my truck but if I didn't loose wrenches and nuts and was generally clumsy it would take an hour, maybe a bit more. Took my longer but I was cleaning everything I could fine. I used compressed air to blow the old grease out of the bearings, hubs etc. Used brake cleaner and lots of rags to get rid of the old grease. For the first time ever I was able to get all those washers to fit under the C-clip at the end of the axle. I never get them all to fit. I am considering doing brake pads now... Then bleed the brakes. then torque everything down.. and clean up the beer bottles. ugh.
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  #10  
Old May 22nd, 2008, 12:03 PM
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Mark McDonough
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Wheel bearings

I just did this job. From road wheel off to back on, just about 1.5- 1.75 hours a side which includes time for pressing out the old bearing races and measuring roundness of the rear seal bores. If there is any deviation in the bore for that seal, the hub should be lightly machined or get a new one. Putting a seal in there, if it is bad, is wasting the time to do the job. It also isnt a bad idea to run a dial gauge across the shoulder surfaces of the stub axle. Again, if it doesnt hold tolerance on those surfaces, it wont hold a seal for long.

All sounds picky but with the number of components in the front end of these rigs seems like the business end of these trucks is all up front. BTW, bearings are manufactured in matched sets. Use the whole set, not half of it.
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  #11  
Old May 22nd, 2008, 02:18 PM
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Keith Allen
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Fun

I like the "while I'm here" thought. So go ahead and buy the swivel pin housing kit and replace all that fun stuff while you are half way there. About another hours worth of work unless you are OCD and insist on cleaning everying to look new and then it takes about 3 hours! A press comes in handy as well for the upper and lower bearings.

Good time to install those S/S brake lines as well.

I started my journey two months ago with just going replace the stock center console with a new tuffy. That led to pulling the seats out, which led to replacing the cheap material around the seat box which led to removing the seatbox and rhino lining it, which lead to dropping the leaky transmission and transfer case, which led to a new input gear, which led to rebuilding the transmission and transfer case, which led to replacing the clutch, which led to replacing the rear main seal, which led to replacing the fuel filter, which led to replacing the u-joints, which led to replacing the pinion seals, which led to repacking the rear hubs, which led to new bearings and seals, which led to changing the rotors and pads, which led to new rear shocks and springs, which led to new front shocks and springs, which led to repacking the front hubs, which led to more new bearings and seals, which led to me wondering how that swivel pin housing thing worked, which led to replacing all the seals and bearing in the swivel pin housing, which led to S/S break lines, which led to new steering dampner, which is why my 90 is still not "up and running" and looks like Fred Flintstone uses it for his daily driver and my wife is really pissed about the "routine maintenance costs".

So be careful with that "while I'm here" thought after all!

Good luck
KA
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  #12  
Old May 22nd, 2008, 03:32 PM
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Tom Rowe
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If everything was rusted, definitely replace the bearings. Timken SET37, SKF BR37. About $13 a set at local autoparts stores, two sets per hub.
Always replace races (cups) when you replace the bearing (cone). The above PN's include both anyway.
If you have a bearing punch they pop out easily.
I use a needle like a syringe needle with a zerk fitting on it to get grease down in the roller cage. A squirt between all rollers. Then a good solid film on the outside of the bearings, and grease the stub axle and distance piece that the seal (use the 3511 double lip seals) rides on. Then pack a bit in the hub itself.
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