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  #81  
Old February 24th, 2016, 11:56 PM
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John B.
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With mine I get the highest temps at 3000 rpm. It drops above and below that point.

Imo, it is safest to have a buzzer alarm as sometimes it creeps up when you don't think it will. With no intake air temperature compensation and no air pressure compensation a gauge and alarm is much more important with these engine than electronically managed ones.
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  #82  
Old February 25th, 2016, 12:01 AM
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As in the fuel pump -- amount/speed?
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  #83  
Old February 25th, 2016, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RBBailey View Post
As in the fuel pump -- amount/speed?
What are you asking?
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  #84  
Old February 25th, 2016, 12:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red90 View Post
There is no altitude compensation. The effect is small with a turbo.

Other things tend to make more impact. Winds directions affecting intercooler air flow is a big impact. Peak EGTs also change with engine speed and how the pump is setup.
As in the fuel pump? As in amount of fuel being fed to the engine?

(I thought for sure my first try was posted right after your post -- at least it was when I looked on my phone just a few minutes ago!)

------ Follow up post added February 24th, 2016 09:40 PM ------

I'm having it set to as close to factory as possible, I may tweak it a tiny bit to get a bit more power after I get a few thousand miles put on it. But really, I only care that it does the hills around here without making people behind me mad, and without losing too much in MPG or reliability.
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  #85  
Old February 25th, 2016, 12:45 AM
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If it is setup stock you should have no smoke and EGTs will always be safe.
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  #86  
Old February 25th, 2016, 01:03 AM
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Bingo.

Other than no smoke, there must be a way to set it proper. But I'm not doing it myself, just thinking.
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  #87  
Old February 25th, 2016, 10:08 AM
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Doug I believe the bearing number is JD9257. I thought one of the many Dave's on the site did this bearing replacement and did a write up on it but I can't find it for the life of me.

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Originally Posted by Uncle Douglas View Post
do you by chance have that John Deere water pump bearing part # ?
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  #88  
Old February 25th, 2016, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by RBBailey View Post
Bingo.

Other than no smoke, there must be a way to set it proper. But I'm not doing it myself, just thinking.
Not really sure what you are saying. They are setup by a diesel shop using a computerized flow bench to Land Rover specs.

If you want to run higher fueling there are a ton of writeups around on how to do it.
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  #89  
Old February 25th, 2016, 10:57 AM
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For those running electric fans, do you add a small electric fan for Intercooler? With wind and speed impacting airflow, what is the solution for airflow compensation. For example, pulling a hill.
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  #90  
Old February 25th, 2016, 11:02 AM
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No.

Not sure I've ever seen a car with a fan on an intercooler from the factory.

Removing the stock shroud on my 200TDI reduced EGTs.

If you were to do it, it would be best, IMO, to make a large shroud to cover both the rad and intercooler with the fan mounted back a bit. Then manually turn on the fan in those situations.
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  #91  
Old February 27th, 2016, 03:26 AM
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Anthony. Are having issues with temps at all? I am expecting that this would not be an issue during our winters.

Also, running with a snorkel should allow for a bit of cooling over the stock intake.

I would think that a stock intercooler would do the job for a properly tuned and otherwise good condition system.

------ Follow up post added February 27th, 2016 12:29 AM ------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red90 View Post
Not really sure what you are saying. They are setup by a diesel shop using a computerized flow bench to Land Rover specs. If you want to run higher fueling there are a ton of writeups around on how to do it.
Yes. That is what I'm saying. I was saying that I'm not trying to tune it myself, and I don't know if anyone else had tuned it out of factory settings in a previous life.
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  #92  
Old February 27th, 2016, 04:47 PM
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I don't know much about the 300tdi so I can't comment there, but I just want to comment on biofuel. For some reason the state likes to push it because it's "green" and possibly helps reduce our dependence on foreign oil, but from a conservation viewpoint it's really bad because you have to destroy natural habitat or convert food crop land in order to grow the energy crops. We can't afford to lose those lands and we don't have enough land on earth to grow enough energy crops to replace oil. So if I had a Tdi I'd use regular diesel or find a way to use old veg oil. I'd steer clear of biodiesel.
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  #93  
Old February 27th, 2016, 04:56 PM
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I agree, that's why I was looking at the recycled cooking oil type. The bio-fuel/congress complex has been really, really bad for South American jungles.

Kind of like the wind farm issue........ don't get me started.
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  #94  
Old February 27th, 2016, 05:11 PM
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Awesome. Also, I don't know if they're normally a part of a 300tdi setup, but consider installing a DPF that meets CARB standards to reduce emissions. Diesel emissions are the number 1 cause of smog and poor local air quality.

There's some info on DPF retrofitting here:
Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) | Ironman
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  #95  
Old February 27th, 2016, 07:56 PM
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Biodiesel gets very little support from the government, unlike other less desirable alternatives like Ethanol. The petroleum industry (and the government) are less likely to encourage a fuel that you can make at home (no profit). Nothing like wind farm subsidies. You're confusing Biodiesel with Palm Oil.
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Originally Posted by RBBailey View Post
I agree, that's why I was looking at the recycled cooking oil type. The bio-fuel/congress complex has been really, really bad for South American jungles. Kind of like the wind farm issue........ don't get me started.
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  #96  
Old February 27th, 2016, 08:18 PM
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Sounds like you don't know much about biodiesel either, Chip. Do you think Veg oil is any different than Biodiesel? Veg oil is unprocessed biodiesel. It's "green" because it reduces 80% of emissions and you can make it at home. A significant portion of the raw material is waste oil because as you know we eat a lot of fried foods in this country (all fast food outlets use massive amounts of cooking oil). We're not destroying wildlife habitat to grow biodiesel but is nice to hear that you have that much of a concern for the environment. We waste 30-40% of our food in the US. About 1/3rd of all food worldwide goes in landfills and creates methane gas. Do you work for a petroleum company, Chip? I'm trying to understand why else someone would spread this type of slander without checking the facts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip View Post
I don't know much about the 300tdi so I can't comment there, but I just want to comment on biofuel. For some reason the state likes to push it because it's "green" and possibly helps reduce our dependence on foreign oil, but from a conservation viewpoint it's really bad because you have to destroy natural habitat or convert food crop land in order to grow the energy crops. We can't afford to lose those lands and we don't have enough land on earth to grow enough energy crops to replace oil. So if I had a Tdi I'd use regular diesel or find a way to use old veg oil. I'd steer clear of biodiesel.
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  #97  
Old February 27th, 2016, 08:37 PM
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I know a lot of biofuels are made from crops grown specifically for that purpose and I think that's bad. But if companies that are making biodiesel use old fryer oil that's awesome. So I looked up one company in Oregon and you're right. SeQuential Biofuels states that their biodiesel is "Made locally in Salem from waste cooking oil collected throughout the Northwest." That's awesome!

------ Follow up post added February 27th, 2016 05:39 PM ------

So does Rogue in Ashland. "Rogue Biofuels collects used cooking oil (UCO) from restaurants throughout Oregon." Pretty cool.
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  #98  
Old February 27th, 2016, 09:52 PM
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I apologize RBBailey for presenting some wrong information, but thank you Carl for helping me to do some research on biodiesel. So from what I've found out today, biodiesel reduces particulate matter, hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide compared to diesel, but increases emissions of nitrogen oxides. NOx causes smog (ground level ozone), acid rain, nitric acid particles, "accelerates “eutrophication,” which leads to oxygen depletion and reduces fish and shellfish populations," etc. So it might be best to use a blend of diesel and biodiesel so there's a decrease in the other pollutants and a small increase in NOx emissions. Also, after some review it looks like the DPF retrofit may be cost prohibitive, but Donaldson offers a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) muffler. I think it would be a good idea for anyone with an older diesel vehicle to install one of those.

Donaldson DOC mufflers: https://www.donaldson.com/en/engine/...-catalyst.html

Nice biodiesel information slide presentation: http://www.biofuels.coop/pdfs/9_emissions.pdf

Source for NOx pollution effects data: Health and Environmental Impacts of NOx - Nitogen Dioxide - Reports - Research Library - XRTLAB
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  #99  
Old February 27th, 2016, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manimal View Post
Sounds like you don't know much about biodiesel either, Chip. Do you think Veg oil is any different than Biodiesel? Veg oil is unprocessed biodiesel. It's "green" because it reduces 80% of emissions and you can make it at home. A significant portion of the raw material is waste oil because as you know we eat a lot of fried foods in this country (all fast food outlets use massive amounts of cooking oil). We're not destroying wildlife habitat to grow biodiesel but is nice to hear that you have that much of a concern for the environment. We waste 30-40% of our food in the US. About 1/3rd of all food worldwide goes in landfills and creates methane gas. Do you work for a petroleum company, Chip? I'm trying to understand why else someone would spread this type of slander without checking the facts.
Chip is partially correct. In Brazil they have been cutting away at the Amazon for years to make various biofuels mandated by the government.
http://sites.duke.edu/amazonianbiofu...ment-overview/

------ Follow up post added February 27th, 2016 09:15 PM ------

There are other negatives to biofuel production as well.
http://econ.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXT...469372,00.html

------ Follow up post added February 27th, 2016 09:19 PM ------

And Texas has been trying to ban biodiesel use for several years because of NOx emissions.
http://www.alternative-energy-news.i...-banned-texas/
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  #100  
Old February 28th, 2016, 12:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manimal View Post
Biodiesel gets very little support from the government, unlike other less desirable alternatives like Ethanol. The petroleum industry (and the government) are less likely to encourage a fuel that you can make at home (no profit). Nothing like wind farm subsidies. You're confusing Biodiesel with Palm Oil.
Palm Oil? Hu... never thought of it.

I was actually thinking more of the ethanol subsidies etc... Although not the same as biodiesel, if bio is made from non-recycled veg-oil, then I thought it would have same origin. Could be wrong!

The places I had looked up and had mentioned in the Portland area say they use recycled cooking oil. Is this the case with all biodiesel?
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