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  #1  
Old February 28th, 2015, 09:52 PM
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Load area camping setups - lets see them

Looking for ideas - i "think" i know which way i'm going but want to see other setups..
Right now i am thinking that i will do the following

3/4" plywood platform for the rear (bed liner-d) over the rubber floor the ARB 50 fridge goes on top of that. Wolf boxes and other stuff under the platform.

I'd like to figure out a stove setup and a rear table (maybe adapting the outback JK table.. )

I need to store a propane bottle as well.. probably try and keep it simple and use a normal big one to allow swap out instead of making refills needed.

I'm going to try and keep it simple since it seems that lately i have been dropping more stuff from the camping list that i use to pack (if its not needed it stays home or gets sold)

I want to keep new holes in the tub to a minimum and allow for switch over to rear seat in an hour or so.. eventually I'll get a trailer but for now i'm going to use the truck.

Any pictures would be great.
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  #2  
Old February 28th, 2015, 10:13 PM
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How tall are you? You're not going to have a whole lot of real estate in the truck after the fridge goes in. Adventure Trailers makes a nice fridge mount/stove combination that works really well, although you'll have to mount it at the rear door which is the least conducive to your sleeping arrangement.

As for tables, I suggest utilizing the space you have on the cargo door for some type of fold-down configuration. I just drew up a replacement door card out of stainless and milled a table out of HDPE to use. I think the table wound up being about 26" wide. You only get about 11" of depth before you crash into the rear wiper motor with it folded up, but I have prepared several meals on it and don't find it to be inadequate.

Going back to space being at a premium in your truck, a full-sized propane tank is going to eat up a lot. I cooked two meals a day on a 5lb tank for 4 days and barely made a dent in it, so you shouldn't be concerned about running through your fuel. It's also mounted on the rear ladder with a Fourtreks system, since having it in the cab is kind of sketchy.

I'll dig up some pictures in a few and share them with you.

-Ash
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Old February 28th, 2015, 10:27 PM
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Not tall enough (5'6") already for my plans.. maybe the combo slide on the left side of the load space between the wheel wells but its going to push the fridge up as well.. not as much as the platform does though..

I'm in a Soft top as well.. so conflicted with security (a drawer is the only option here) vs access (PITA factor) and i would like to be able to pack up quickly.

Longer range i am going to get a trailer but for now i'd need to stay self contained.
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Old February 28th, 2015, 10:41 PM
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You can do a lot without a trailer, even in a 90, if you set everything up right. Sleeping in the truck requires a big compromise for both your storage configuration and your sleeping configuration. I'd maybe re-consider that and keep the two mutually exclusive. I sleep in a hammock and it's without a doubt the best nights sleep I've ever had away from my bed, even into colder temperatures. No fussing with a tent and it sets up in minutes.

-Ash
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Old February 28th, 2015, 10:49 PM
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i was going to do a RTT, i think on a SD type rack with a flat platform i.e. no basket.

(I also have an Oz RV-5 but setup/tear down is a pita for the ground tent, plus i'd like to leave the cots at home)
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Old February 28th, 2015, 10:51 PM
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D90 soft top is NOT the right tool for overland configuration. You really need to shoot for a modular setup until you get your trailer. Is this setup just for you, or you and someone else?

Based on what you've said about requirements and the constraints of your vehicle, I'd be looking at a Kanz Outdoor kitchen to go with your fridge, and weather resistant soft luggage (eg North Face, ARB, Tepui Tent Gear Bag featured on exp right now) to pack in your crevises. You really don't have the space for hard storage.

A natural and highly recommended addition for overlanding is a drawer system, but that really complicates your daily requirements for the back bench.

I'm not sure what your shooting for regarding trailers, but you can get a used military M416 trailer for under $1k and be able to throw everything in there for trips. when you are ready for a more elaborate and upscale trailer, you can sell the M416 easily.

Also, everyone makes their own tailgate table in Defenders. It's too easy. You don't have to jerry rig a jeep accessory. Plenty of examples on the web.

Stick with a portable tent for an ST D90.

Good luck.
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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:09 PM
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ON that i agree the Soft top is not optimal - or the 90 for that matter. My JKU is my DD along with dive truck so it's modifications are limited (i.e. no lift, jeeper big tires, self systems, drawers, etc). I'll mostly be doing fun stuff in the 90 either alone or with one (1) of my daughters with me. the 90 can do 2 but any more and its out of room.

Longer term is a Moby1 or Socal XS for flexibility between the trucks - but i need to save some coin for that.

my main aim is doing a couple of weeks at a time on the TAT or the like as well as more off road events - so USA bound.
Returning it rear passenger capable is something i would like to be able to do (within a few hours). But i have other trucks
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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:10 PM
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So here's the setup in one of my more recent builds. It's made up of four boxes that anchor into the tub, and everything is constructed out of a 3/4" lightweight composite material that is coated in Line-X. I haven't weighed it all, but I would be surprised it it were over 120lbs. This is a mostly-permanent configuration in the truck, and I'm in the process of designing a system for my 110 that is less obtrusive and easier to remove. You might be able to draw some inspiration here, though.

The outer boxes on the fenders house the tools and recovery equipment that aren't frequently accessed, and the 'belly box', as I call it, holds all of the regularly used items like cookware and lighting. The L-Track channels on top of the belly box are spaced so that a Wolf box can drop down between them to keep them from sliding around, and of course the track is used for anchoring cargo as well. There are two lids on the top of the belly box with friction hinges to hold them open, and a removable hatch on the end of the box that allows you access without having to unload the entire truck. There's also a 15 gallon polyethylene tank in front of the Engel that provides filtered hot or cold water for drinking or showering.

You can also see the table setup that I mentioned earlier.





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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:22 PM
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Thanks ash
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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:25 PM
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Very nice!
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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:50 PM
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Thanks guys. The setup looks a little hectic in the pictures but that was for a whole month in the truck so we had a considerable amount of gear.

The configuration for my 110 will just be flush with the tops of the fenders so that I can still utilize all of the cargo space that a 3-door has to offer, and without rear seats I should have more space than I need. I don't plan to sleep in the truck, but I do like the idea of being able to if the need arises. I'll probably do multiple compartments accessible from above, similar to the belly box on the 90, with a provision for a tray-mounted stove. The fridge will likely sit on top of it all to keep its footprint minimal when it's out of the truck.

I've been rolling around the idea of offering a cubby/drawer system for guys who don't want to hassle with building their own systems. Not sure if there's a huge interest in something like that, though, since everyone has different wants and needs.

-Ash
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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:00 AM
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Here's mine. I built a cubby on the driver's side for kitchen stuff up top and electronics/etc below. Then a separate shelf for the fridge and the cots slide underneath. Then a chicken coop and angled steel shelf for misc gear. I made a pull up table for the rear door as well. The walk through video won't load so I'll have to work on that.

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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:03 AM
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Here's the link to the video
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Old March 1st, 2015, 06:47 AM
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Liking what I'm seeing. Its nice to think about summer in the middle of what will be the snowiest winter on record in Boston perhaps as soon as tomorrow morning....
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Old March 1st, 2015, 08:47 AM
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Robert, not trying to be smart, but after years of long distance motorcycle trips, as well as multi week wheeling trips in s/t 90's, less is truly more.
Take a look at tent cots- one XL while the kids are small, then add a second S one when they get appropriate ages. Drawer system level with top of wheel wells. Table on back door, even fridge on top of drawer system. Make it about the trip/adventure/destination, and the required 'list' of stuff shrinks quickly.
Not discounting Ash and Marks setups at all, but the more stuff, the longer time to setup and tear down camp each and every time. In the end, it depends on the type of trip, the overall goal of same, and the personality of the people involved.
The best thing I ever did with my spouse travel wise was offering up an entire saddlebag for a motorcycle w/e get away. Initially she said what was the big deal, as I got the other- until she saw they were different sizes (d/t exhaust routing- and yes, I took the smaller one) and I had tools and spares as well... And we went from Clt to the mountains rafting, then over to the coast, and home. Sure makes it easier on dive trips, well, all trips since- and that was 20 years ago!!
Bottom line, take it all, leave behind next time what you didn't use or felt was in the way, and make your 'system' after determining your individual needs. The construction is the easy part.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 10:11 AM
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Just finishing off my drawer box on old red.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rovertrader View Post
Robert, not trying to be smart, but after years of long distance motorcycle trips, as well as multi week wheeling trips in s/t 90's, less is truly more.
Take a look at tent cots- one XL while the kids are small, then add a second S one when they get appropriate ages. Drawer system level with top of wheel wells. Table on back door, even fridge on top of drawer system. Make it about the trip/adventure/destination, and the required 'list' of stuff shrinks quickly.
Not discounting Ash and Marks setups at all, but the more stuff, the longer time to setup and tear down camp each and every time. In the end, it depends on the type of trip, the overall goal of same, and the personality of the people involved.
The best thing I ever did with my spouse travel wise was offering up an entire saddlebag for a motorcycle w/e get away. Initially she said what was the big deal, as I got the other- until she saw they were different sizes (d/t exhaust routing- and yes, I took the smaller one) and I had tools and spares as well... And we went from Clt to the mountains rafting, then over to the coast, and home. Sure makes it easier on dive trips, well, all trips since- and that was 20 years ago!!
Bottom line, take it all, leave behind next time what you didn't use or felt was in the way, and make your 'system' after determining your individual needs. The construction is the easy part.
This is ABSOLUTELY correct in my experience. It really comes down to being completely honest with yourself about what your requirements are. Your modification path should begin with single piece of paper where you write out what your requirement is in a sentence that does not mention gear or stuff in any way.

Answer these questions:
  1. How many people traveling?
  2. How long will you camp for 80% of your trips
  3. Will other vehicles usually be going on your trips?
  4. What is the minimum comforts required of your usual suspect passengers?

Once you do this, you can write a requirements sentence like this: "I want to be equipped to travel with one additional companion for 2-4 nights in semi-primitive campsites with facilities without any other vehicles, and be able to convert back to supporting 3 other passengers when not on trips"

That is your subscription for gear.. and it changes everything.

I think I'm about on my 4th generation of overland major revisions and I'd assess myself honestly at the 90% of target stage. Here's my requirement statement.

"I want to be equipped to travel with up to 3 other passengers onboard, and with another vehicle for up to 7 days without food resupply. My kit needs to support sleeping for 4, and cooking/dining for 6. It is assumed that the other vehicle will not contribute to cooking gear, but will contribute to food storage. Fuel range required would be around 400 miles between refills. Water supply needs will be self sustained for 48 hours with capability for hot water hygiene if water supply is available in camp. In addition, vehicle must be a daily driver that can support 4-6 occupants when not in camping/overlanding mode of operation" ( that last one is the REAL challenge).

when I faced this requirement head on, I was able to make drastic changes to what I had and needed. Then I was able to go out on trips and honestly, objectively validate my kit and assumptions. Don't get emotionally connected to anything. All kit needs to earn it's keep or be replaced. And yes, if it doesn't get used in a trip, if it doesn't involved a possible life saving emergency, do without it.

Here is a recommendation for a fantastic acid test that has got my setup refined to it's current state:
  • Be able to start cooking in a pan while your guest(s) are sitting occupied in 10 minutes from engine off.
  • Be able to leave in 10 minutes or less for an emergency room visit
  • Be able to sleep comfortably on uneven ground in mud during a rain storm
  • Be able to go to sleep comfortably in 10 minutes after pulling into camp at 11pm
  • Be completely done with camp setup in 15 minutes for everyone
  • Be able to make and drink coffee in 5 minutes anytime
  • Be able to allow women to go to the bathroom privately in 5 minutes anytime (for guys like us with camping wives/daughters)

In my experience, if you bust any of these rules, you have more work to do. In my first and 2nd generation of setup it took 45 minutes to be done with camp, and 30 minutes to start cooking. that made overnight camping almost not worth it, and setup/teardown a real downer to think about.

As you start going through this journey, you'll start looking at everything you have. Don't grandfather anything! Just because you already have a piece of equipment doesn't mean you need to design around it. If there is something better that meets your needs, sell it and get what's right. The right gear or not can make or break a kit. Just like the old saying, "there is no bad weather, just bad gear", the same holds true for your kit. And as I mentioned, you'll reach a point like me where you are scrutinizing everything in your kit and saying stuff to yourself like "why do I have two flathead screwdrivers? Do I really need two in my kit? No I don't, this one goes back in garage".
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Old March 1st, 2015, 11:15 AM
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Thanks for sharing your pictures guys. I love to see what other people have done to the interior of their vehicles to allow them to stay out on the trail for weeks at a time.

I agree with those of you who suggested that a D90 with canvas top is not the best platform for long duration overlanding unless you intend to use the D90 as a container to haul your gear and plan to camp outside your vehicle.

Personally I like working with aluminum. Wood is thick and heavy.

And since we are sharing pictures:

My truck was designed to be single camping with a large dog. The design criteria included being able to stay out 7 days without restocking. the vehicle carries 42 gallons of fuel in three built in fuel tanks, 15 gallons of drinking water in a built in water tank, five gallons of propane in a built in propane tank and a second battery for the fridge and other rear electrics



Rear interior with vehicle loaded for a long trip. I'm a strong believer in a place for everything and everything in its place. I lay a chase lounge pad on the floor for trips so my Irish Wolfhound can be comfortable. His food bag along with the bowls sit on the passenger side floor.

Left side, rear to front:

kitchen unit - This unit has a propane cooker with 2 burners, a broiler, a sink and storage area underneath. I store my dishes, cookware, canned and bottled foods in this storage space

Above rear side window Storage rack (above left side window) - This is a storage shelf that sits above the stove . I usually keep flatware, pot holders, fire lighter, spray cooking oil, a cereal bowl & cup here.

Sink stand - This is a custom sink stand that holds a second sink. The front access door folds up to provide additional work space. There is a water pump and filter mounted below the sink. The faucet swings for both sinks and can point out the side window if I need to run water outside the vehicle. I store cleaning supplies, a stove top toaster and ale inside this cabinet.

Left side wardrobe - A 15 gallon stainless steel water tank is fitted below this cabinet. There is a rough screen filter and 1 way flow valve near the cabinet base. You can see a porta-potty in its stowed position in the cabinet base. This cabinet hast three shelves plus vertical stowage for a camera tripod and a pick handle. In this cabinet I keep clothing, shoes, books and recovery straps.


Right side, rear to front:

Air pump (not visible, at rear of body) - Quickair2 12 Volt pump provides are to the rear ARB locker and for airing up tyres. There is a gauge & quick release connector easily accessible at the rear.

Folding jump seat & rear battery - This is a standard Land Rover side facing folding rear seat. In the side bench area under the seat is a deep cycle 12V battery that powers the rear electrics and the radios.

Refrigerator & stand - This is a Norcold (same as ARB) refrigerator sitting on a stand I fabricated. The base of the refrigerator stand is storage space with a flip down door. In here I stow enough engine oil for an oil change, oil filter, fuel filter and a bottle of power steering fluid. The upper sides of the truck slope inwards a little so the fridge needs to be about 2 inches from the body side in order to have open lid clearance. I stow a large griddle between the refrigerator and body. I also use the refrigerator as a table for eating.

Right side wardrobe - I have added a shelf neat the top and a couple racks inside the door. On the shelf I store things like spare fan belts, a 300 watt DC to AC converter, toilet paper, Kleenex, and towels. Below in the main area I stow my nut & bolt box, a wine storage container, sleeping bag and inflatable mattress. There is a fold up jump seat built into the bottom of the wardrobe. There is space for a couple large cereal boxes behind the lowered jump seat. The inside of the door has a mirror with two racks below. The racks hold things like deodorant, hand lotion and other toiletries.

Tea cabinet (across body rear above the rear door) - Added in 1999. I got this idea from touring Herbert Zipkin's Land Rover. It is a long cabinet that stretches the entire rear of the vehicle. Herb used it for map storage, I use the space for tea storage. I have space for 7 verities of tea back there plus a repair kit. The kit contains spare bulbs, fuses, a snap resetting kit and a tarp eye resetting kit. There is also a box of water proof matches. Yes I drink lot of tea and I like variety.






Rear set up for cooking



Dish washing mode


Current side of left wardrobe when in camping mode.

Before you modify the inside rear of your vehicle I suggest laying under the rear of your truck and spend some time looking for wasted space between the outer body panels and the interior body panels.

I found space for a custom made 15 gallon stainless steel water tank on the left side (long wheelbase 2 door) between the frame and side bench in front of the rear wheel.

On the right side I found space for a horizontally mounted 5 gal propane tank in the same location and for a second battery above the frame behind the right rear wheel. All without taking any space inside the vehicle or hanging it on the outside. I love to use space that the factory wasted.


Just in case the built in tank runs dry on the trail (last about 3-4 weeks) I carry a small aluminum propane tank inside a section of ABS tubing on the roof rack. The spare can be quickly plugged into my built in system.


Who says you can not camp in comfort inside a Land Rover? I can go from driving to camp set up, a glass of wine poured, dinner salad made and dinner cooking within 5 minutes. In any weather.
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  #19  
Old March 1st, 2015, 11:29 AM
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As always a fantastic setup Terriann! But you represent the extreme opposite spectrum of the PO as well. For your configuration, one would be required to be A) an "empty nester" and B) heavily modify their vehicle. Those go into that honest assessment of what one's requirements are.

Once my children are no longer part of the equation down the road (including carpool), then I will once again make revision to reclaim alot of that space, and rewrite my requirements that reduces passenger capability and extends unsupported duration. But for now, I will enjoy my setup and my children in more frequent and shorter trips, and leave the longer trips to us guys with empty seats in our rigs.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 01:49 PM
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Quote:
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As always a fantastic setup Terriann! But you represent the extreme opposite spectrum of the PO as well. For your configuration, one would be required to be A) an "empty nester" and B) heavily modify their vehicle. Those go into that honest assessment of what one's requirements are.
Exactly. My truck is set up for single camping with a giant breed dog. But I thought others might get some ideas that might apply to their situation.

Right now I am working on the chapter of my overlanding book covering choosing a vehicle platform for overlanding. The one behind it will be on modifying a truck for overlanding which for some people would be just adding convenient tie downs and a second battery to run the fridge. Other people will need to decide the best location for the shower in their deuce and a half conversion.

And yes a lot of what you stated in your earlier post is critical. And of course you need the design buy in from everyone who will be making those long overlanding trips.

I noticed that you have given overlanding a lot of thought from the direction of taking a family and you live at the opposite end of the country. Would you be interested in becoming one of my book reviewer's? If yes contact me offline

tjwakeman@gmail.com

and we can discuss this.

Take care,
__________________
TeriAnn
1960 Land Rover Dormobile, The go anywhere class B RV
1961 Triumph TR3A. Life is too short not to drive a classic British roadster.


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