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  #21  
Old January 31st, 2013, 10:14 AM
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I've been following these guys from the beginning.

http://www.greasecar.com/

One of my friends in the ME Department was doing something like this and he got me interested in the tree-huger approach of not using fossil fuel. Too bad I haven't done shit about it.
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  #22  
Old January 31st, 2013, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gomotomoto View Post
Just today i read that some diesels can burn cooking oil if the ratio is right? So I figured post up and ask what's fact and fiction about diesels, specifically the ones found in the defender 110's.

Basically looking to learn any Other quirky facts and trivial things that make the Diesel engine unique.
requires a mechanical pump- yours won't
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  #23  
Old January 31st, 2013, 10:25 AM
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When I sent my injection pump off to get it rebuilt the guy told me that he was surprised that I didn't have any problems with it sooner. He said that the low sulphur diesel we have here acts differently than the diesel overseas. He suggested Stanadyne additive to help the seals last longer. I think he said the performance formula.

Anybody else hear of this?

http://www.stanadyne.com/view.php?id=45
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  #24  
Old January 31st, 2013, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjfslaughter View Post
Diesel has a higher tax rate also. At the Fed level its about $0.06 a gallon and it varies at the state level.
True, but not enough to make up the price difference between gas and diesel.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bossman429 View Post
But it used to be cheaper. Which I don't get
It used to be cheaper because it wasnt based on energy. When they changed that policy, it went up. Not too difficult to reason out either. We pay more for anything with more energy, so they did it with diesel fuel.
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  #25  
Old January 31st, 2013, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viggen View Post
Which is why it is more expensive than gas. It requires less refining but since it results in more btu energy, it is priced accordingly.
Tax is why, because of the tractor trailer and large trucks that use it, it is their additional road tax if you will. The market for diesels in cars isnt big enough to change that.
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  #26  
Old January 31st, 2013, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSBriggs View Post
There is also more economy of scale and a larger market that impacts the price lower with gas than diesel. You can compare the price of red (dyed) diesel and see what many (but not all) of the taxes are.

-Jeff
a lot of people run that in trucks.... till they get caught.
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  #27  
Old January 31st, 2013, 12:02 PM
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Diesels run like absolute dogs when they are cold. First time I drove my 90 in cold weather I almost thought something was wrong with it. Of course, once it warms it up it's fine. Just letting it warm up for about 10 minutes in the driveway cured that issue pretty easily.
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  #28  
Old January 31st, 2013, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FSU_Disco View Post
Diesels run like absolute dogs when they are cold. First time I drove my 90 in cold weather I almost thought something was wrong with it. Of course, once it warms it up it's fine. Just letting it warm up for about 10 minutes in the driveway cured that issue pretty easily.
most wont even warm up until there is a load put on them.
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  #29  
Old January 31st, 2013, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjfslaughter View Post
most wont even warm up until there is a load put on them.
That tells you how cold it gets down here I guess I should have said letting it run for a few minutes in the a.m. actually lets the temp needle move a little bit before I get to work
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  #30  
Old January 31st, 2013, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpayne View Post
When I sent my injection pump off to get it rebuilt the guy told me that he was surprised that I didn't have any problems with it sooner. He said that the low sulphur diesel we have here acts differently than the diesel overseas. He suggested Stanadyne additive to help the seals last longer. I think he said the performance formula.

Anybody else hear of this?

http://www.stanadyne.com/view.php?id=45
I use this as well, recommended by the factory diesel mechanics repairing huge diesel gensets used on the base.
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  #31  
Old January 31st, 2013, 01:52 PM
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I had a td with a separate tank in the back, had to sell it a week after getting it as the smell of mc d was overwhelming and the howl 90 was oily real nasty
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  #32  
Old January 31st, 2013, 02:10 PM
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Diesels are designed to run at wide open. That's when they are most efficient....this why they have no air control(throttle body)
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  #33  
Old January 31st, 2013, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bossman429 View Post
Diesels are designed to run at wide open. That's when they are most efficient....this why they have no air control(throttle body)
Ill tell the cop i am saving the environment next time i get pulled over in the jetta.
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  #34  
Old January 31st, 2013, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mybluett View Post
I use this as well, recommended by the factory diesel mechanics repairing huge diesel gensets used on the base.
I used stanadyne as well. In a pinch, 2 stroke oil can work as well.

Another fact is that the diesel motor itself is not loud. Its the pump
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  #35  
Old January 31st, 2013, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viggen View Post
Another fact is that the diesel motor itself is not loud. Its the pump

Fact ???????? I have diesels with no injection pumps and I assure you this is not factual.
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  #36  
Old January 31st, 2013, 10:00 PM
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WVO and other waste oils

I experimented with different fuels in my 300TDI and...
Veg just dumped in the tank will smoke pretty bad, but the rotary IP seems to handle it pretty well at first.
Eventually the injectors ad IP will fail.
When the IP fails, it won't produce enough fuel pressure to start the vehicle, but if you can get it started, the engine will still run pretty well.

If you plan to run WVO or SVO, it must be clean and heated and not remain in the IP, Injection lines, and injectors when the engine is not in use.
Mixing helps, but is not a solution.

The optimum setup is to have 2 separate fuel systems with the ability to switch between veg and diesel for both the fuel feed and fuel return. This is accomplished with a 3 way 12V fuel valve. Since veg eats nitride, neoprene, and other rubber type products, you have to eventually (if not right away) switch over to viton hose and O rings. This is a pain, especially when the O-ring fails in a Disco IP with that enrichment linkage on the side of the IP. Replacing that leaking O-ring on the enrichment linkage is a pain. So the next challenge is to heat the fuel. You want it to be between 140 and 180 F at the injectors and this sounds easy, but in cold climates can be a challenge. So again to do it right you'll need a diesel tank, diesel sedimenter and a diesel filter on the veg side of the fuel system you'll need a veg tank, veg sedimenter and veg fuel filter.

Veg has the consistency of apple sauce when cold and jello when really cold. This varies with the type of veg oil. So you'll need a heated sedimenter & heated fuel filter and generally a heat exchanger and possibly a heated veg fuel tank.

You'll then be able to start and run on diesel until the engine and veg is warm enough to switch over. Then before you shut the engine off switch back to diesel so you can start up next time. That way the IP, Injection lines, and injectors are flushed out and when parked full of diesel. Veg left in these components will gum everything up. When veg is exposed to air like in a vented fuel tank sitting for a few months, it will thicken and form a thin chicken skin type layer and eventually harden. Underneath it will gum up into a contact cement type consistency. If you burn it regularly and are constantly circulating it, this will help, but eventually the bottom of the tank will form a thick layer. This will need to be cleaned annually, so make sure your veg tank has a removable cover with viton gasket.

ATF seems to burn really well and different waste oils vary.

The Mercedes indirect injection like the OM617 do much better on veg than the TDI.
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  #37  
Old February 2nd, 2013, 01:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSBriggs View Post
Its certainly frowned upon. Unless you are foolish about it, it would be very difficult to get caught in a passenger vehicle. Hell, around here alot of the 'dyed' diesel doesn't even have the dye in it.

-Jeff
Is it hypocritical that the pumps at the town garage are marked "dyed diesel"

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  #38  
Old February 2nd, 2013, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 130Tdi View Post
Fact ???????? I have diesels with no injection pumps and I assure you this is not factual.
Okay, so maybe not a lot of the sound but a large majority of it comes from the injection pump. Theres a marked difference in the external noise in a diesel using an inline pump and one using a rotary pump. It also has to do with indirect versus direct injection.
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  #39  
Old February 2nd, 2013, 09:49 AM
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Indirect vs Direct Injection and Alternate Fuels

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viggen View Post
Okay, so maybe not a lot of the sound but a large majority of it comes from the injection pump. Theres a marked difference in the external noise in a diesel using an inline pump and one using a rotary pump. It also has to do with indirect versus direct injection.
About 8 years ago it was Pendy who explained the difference between direct and indirect injection to me. At that time, Jim and Charlie Haigh were the only guys that I knew of that had any knowledge of both Land Rovers and diesel engines in USA.

At the time, I was building 3.0 GM gasoline engine conversions and didn't care much for diesels, but soon learned the value thanks to those two and Mercedes Jim.

The 200 & 300TDI engines are louder at rpm than say the Mercedes OM617 which has indirect injection. They both clunk a lot at idle, but as the OM617 revs up, it sounds more like a gasoline engine than a diesel and all the the 200s & 300s we've had just keep clunking.

The odd thing is that the Isuzu 4JB1-T is basically a TDI with the "combustion chamber" indented in the pistons and when revved the idle clunking mostly goes away. At very high RPMs, the 4JB1-T is as smooth as the Mercedes OM617.

Have often wondered why this particular Isuzu was so much quieter than the Rover TDI, but just attributed it to the differences in the engines themselves. I guess every diesel is different, especially when compared to the common rail breed.

Also to sort of stay on track with this thread, the indirect injection diesels precombustion seem to generally do a lot better on alternate fuels with a lot less exhaust smoke compared to the 200 & 300 TDIs. Although when the head is off both a 300TDI and an OM617 that each burned lots of veg, they both were surprisingly clean when considering what they were burning and how much of it they consumed.
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