Installing Jump Seats - Defender Source
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  #1  
Old May 16th, 2006, 04:31 PM
johnnyg15
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John Gorman
97 BRG Defender 90
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Installing Jump Seats

Hi,

I just took the back seat out of my 97 D90 ST. I ordered 4 new Jump Seats from Exmoor in the UK and plan on installing them. They look pretty easy to install, although I have never done it before. Anybody know how difficult it is? If it is too difficult, then does anyone know someone who can put them in? I'm pretty sure the Dealers won't install them. Any tips are appreciated.....
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  #2  
Old May 16th, 2006, 04:51 PM
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saber6
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gh
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John:
Super easy, a 1 on a 5 scale. I've taken mine out and then in and then out again. I would use SS hardware, looks better. gh
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  #3  
Old May 16th, 2006, 04:55 PM
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Just set them where you want, make your marks, and start drilling. If the Exmmor kit doesn't come with hardware, post a message and I'll spec what my factory installed jump seats are bolted down with.

What are you doing for seat belts?

Follow-up Post:

GH, you beat me to the punch. Ditto on the stainless, but make sure you use properly graded hardware on the restraints.
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  #4  
Old May 16th, 2006, 05:07 PM
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Stainless yes, but make sure you isolate it from the alloy of the tub. The alloy and the stainless react very badly and long term will cause nasty corrosion holes (especially in the wheel wells where they get wet a lot).

Take a look at the side of an old NAS 1971-1974 Series III. These had steel seat belt brackets against the alloy and in a few short years they ate right through the tub sides (corrosion).
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  #5  
Old May 16th, 2006, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ECR
Stainless yes, but make sure you isolate it from the alloy of the tub. The alloy and the stainless react very badly and long term will cause nasty corrosion holes (especially in the wheel wells where they get wet a lot).

Take a look at the side of an old NAS 1971-1974 Series III. These had steel seat belt brackets against the alloy and in a few short years they ate right through the tub sides (corrosion).
Mike

I'm not sure I understand, but are you saying that the stainless fasteners react with the aluminum tub or is it the steel members under the tub you're speaking of?

DJ
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  #6  
Old May 16th, 2006, 09:31 PM
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gh
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Mike:
Very good point, I will have to make adjustments.
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  #7  
Old May 17th, 2006, 08:51 AM
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The alloy (called Birmabright) is a magnesium/ aluminum alloy.
Steel reacts badly with the alloy when combined with water (makes a battery basically). This is why the doors corrode because the steel frame of the door is not isolated from the alloy skin of the door.
Stainless (although great for not rusting) actually has a higher corrosion rate with the alloy. In a perfect world all the steel (and stainless) would be isolated from touching alloy in a Defender. This isn't practicle though, but if you are adding stainless, make sure it is isolated from the alloy. When we do jump seats we use stainless bolts, but use a teflon washer between the stainless flat washer and the body. This gives a good shot at less corrosion.

John Gerdings web site had a good section on corrosion and how to understand how different metals react
http://www.foroverforever.net
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  #8  
Old May 18th, 2006, 08:27 AM
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I was suprised when I took my seats out that was no type of backer plate in the wheel well. It seems to me that in an accident that the bolds would just rip through the aluminum if anybody was sitting in the seat. Kinda like attaching a tow hook on your bumper by simply drilling a hold and putting a bolt through. Then expect it to hold up to any force.
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  #9  
Old May 18th, 2006, 08:35 AM
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The seat belt is what transmits the accident forces to the body. Even if you are sitting in the seat very little force will be placed on the seat hardware.
If you don't have a seat belt on and you hit the brakes... you go flying out of the seat. Only the seat's weight puts force on the bolts.
If you have a seat belt on and you hit the brakes... you go flying and the seat belt tries to hold you back. The forces on the seat itself are small. The forces on the bolts for the seat belt are very great and good size backing plates (or something even better) should be used on all seat belt bolts.
That is why on a D90SW the seat belt bolts are bolted in to aspects of the roll cage and other beefy brackets.
The seats themselves just have small square backing plates.
The only real way to put some major force on the seat bolts would be to grab onto it as you go flying by.
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  #10  
Old May 18th, 2006, 09:50 AM
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Chris Davis
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You can look at a galvanic chart for different metals to tell how things will stand one another. The farther the two metals are away from each other on the chart, the stronger the galvanic reaction will be and one of the two objects will take the brunt of the corrosion as the "sacrificial anode" so to speak. When mounting steel bolts and the aluminum skin (Birmabright?), the steel is the anode and it rusts out. When mounting stainless steel to the aluminum, the aluminum is now the annode and you can corrode out the panel (usually resulting in enlarged and thinner bolt holes in AL). Sometimes it is good to use regular steel and have to replace the bolt. Separating the two metals by using things like mylar washer (usually what I use) is a good idea and will usually help alot (there is still some contact but it is minimized and/or eliminated).

Here are a couple charts I found with a quick search...
http://www.metal-mart.com/Guides/Galvanic.htm
http://www.engineersedge.com/galvanic_capatability.htm
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  #11  
Old May 21st, 2006, 03:20 PM
johnnyg15
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John Gorman
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Post Hardware

Well ExMoor didn't include the hardware. Could somebody, (Captain Spaulding maybe) post what his specs are? Sorry for the trouble but I want to get this right the first time.

Thx.
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