Fuel Burning Heaters and Altitude - Defender Source
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  #1  
Old February 24th, 2011, 10:26 AM
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mark kellgren
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Question Fuel Burning Heaters and Altitude

So I've recently learned from conversations on the Expedition Portal that FBH's are susceptible to issues at altitude, since they don't compensate for altitude changes, and thus run rich and smoke at higher altitudes. It was also mentioned (loosely) that there have been owners have taken several different approaches to address/compensate for this shortcoming, but no details.

So my question is to you FBH owners with Webasto's and Eberspachers in your diesel D's:
  1. Have you experienced issues at altitude,
  2. if so at what altitude and what issues,
  3. and who has done or heard something in reference to altitude compensation/leaning the FBH to address this?
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  #2  
Old February 24th, 2011, 02:16 PM
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Andrew J. Hutton
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I will make a couple assumptions here as I don't have one on-hand to look at.

I assume you can use to adjust the fuel mixture.

The highest you're driving is in North America, say Vendawoo, WY at 9,000ft then you have 73% of the O2 available at sea level.

This means that you need to reduce fueling by 27% to avoid having unburnt fuel in the exhaust (which also overheats the exhaust)

If you're looking at visiting the highest road in the Himalayas on the North Face of Everest then you're looking at 50% of the available O2 and a corresponding decrease in fueling and obviously output-heat.

There is one possible "solution" and that is to supercharge the heater with an electric fan on the heater intake manifold to build additional pressure and therefore increase the available O2 levels to simulate sea level. If you're just using it to pre-heat before starting this might work, if you're trying to stay warm overnight without running the engine I suspect electrical demands would exceed reasonable. You would need to know the air-intake consumption rate to calculate how much additional pressure would be required and determine if it is even a viable option, but it would work assuming the intake is a sealed system that can build pressure. It may require an intermediate pressure vessel to work reliably.
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  #3  
Old February 25th, 2011, 04:52 PM
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Keith Kreutzer
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Mine is a little smelly at 10,000 feet, but it still makes heat so I don't care.
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  #4  
Old February 25th, 2011, 05:03 PM
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mark kellgren
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Quote:
Originally Posted by revor View Post
Mine is a little smelly at 10,000 feet, but it still makes heat so I don't care.
That's what I was hoping for! Good enough.
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Old February 25th, 2011, 05:24 PM
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John B.
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Mine lives at 4000 feet. I think I've used it to 700 feet and not seen anything strange happen.

I'm quite sure that these run substantial excess air.

Quick Google: http://www.webasto-outdoors.com/serv...base.html#c155
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