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  #21  
Old January 11th, 2010, 02:27 PM
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Scott
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I use a brass hammer when working on the truck, because it will not spark. I also have a sledge hammer for straightening skid plates.

As for the Fluke, I would start with the basic one. Also, you can pick up one or two up cheap at Harbor freight.

For the PB Blaster, I would pick up a few different types, so you have them when you need them.
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  #22  
Old January 11th, 2010, 02:30 PM
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Brass hammer tends to knock (vibrate) nuts/bults better than steel.

Agree on the brass punch for races.....can use regular hammer on brass punch for races.
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  #23  
Old January 11th, 2010, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manimal View Post
Thanks for the list. I'm a newbie too. I started about 1 1/2 year ago when I got my truck. I have to say that I'm really grateful for all the support and answers that I've gotten here on this site. It has been really helpful, especially when you are new and clueless to world of car mechanics. I really appreciate it and you guys are awesome.
x2!! This site is invaluable, and you guys are great. It's nice not to have to worry about being flamed when asking newbie questions. Thanks everybody!

PS - I remembered this article from "Burke's Corner" in the August/September 2009 Rover's North catalog about useful tools to carry on the trail: http://www.roversnorth.com/web/rover...ws/index2.html. Seems like a good place to start for a field tool kit.
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  #24  
Old January 11th, 2010, 02:37 PM
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Jim Cheney
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Yep, I do like that bone. Thanks Galpin.

My tool-bag got stolen a few years ago out of my truck, so I was in a position to re-buy a bunch of basics. The stolen stuff was from a big Craftsman set I'd had for years, but I wanted better stuff.

I find the fully-polished stuff is easier to use as well as being better looking. Its easier to clean and easier to manipulate. I don't need Snap-On for my purposes, so I just got the polished Craftsman stuff. It does cost more, and you can't get it in any kits except the really large ones, so you have to be a bit more selective on what you buy.


Here are the tools I use most:
8-19mm long-pattern fully polished wrench set
set of 8 polished ratcheting wrenches in mm
polished ratchets in 1/2, 3/8, and 1/2 drive (one nice thing about the polished ones is that if/when you break one, they replace it with a new wrench from open stock, whereas they have recon units of the regular ratchets behind the counter)
large set of laser-etched sockets in deep, normal, six and twelve point varieties
nice screwdrivers

Other stuff I've bought that is helpful/necessary depending on the task is:
a set of 5 "big" polished wrenches (sizes up to 30mm)
line wrenches
3/8 and 1/2 drive breaker bars
a digital torque meter
some other stuff
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  #25  
Old January 11th, 2010, 03:05 PM
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Gear wrench 8mm-19mm, no gaps (you have to buy a set and individuals)
12 AND 6 point wrenches and sockets (regular AND deep) as big as possible to as small as possible

Hammers, assorted.

Pliars, assorted

PB blaster

Breaker bar

Pipe in several lengths/diameter

Chisel set

Impact gun 1/2in drive (I got a new dewalt electric for $200 and now never use my compressor)

1/2in bar type torque wrench (fancy ones suck and or break)

Sawzall or similar

4.5in angle grinder

trim puller

razor blades

Biggest screwdriver set sears sells

Impact driver for door and floor screws

A decent stand up tool box.
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  #26  
Old January 11th, 2010, 03:16 PM
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Charles Galpin
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I forgot I keep a few files as well. Instead of a brass punch, I got some cheap aluminum rod while at home depot one day and cut a few lengths out of it for drifts. I also keep rubber gloves on hand, a little magnetic pickup, and need to get one of those little mirrors on a telescope as well.

Oh I got one of these as well which I like because of the clips. The regular roles for wrenches are fine without one but once you start sticking random stuff in them the clips help.

http://www.offroadtrailtools.com/sho...ct_detail&p=72
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  #27  
Old January 12th, 2010, 12:59 AM
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Andrew Najarian
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The idea behind Brass is that it is soft and is less likely to mar the surface you are striking.

I agree with Jim, the Non-Polished Craftsman ratchets aren't good for anything but a hammer. I broke several, and when I saw the bucket at the counter that they have for replacements I gave up on them. The polished are exponentially better quality and strength. I also have a lot of Craftsman sockets and have not had a problem.

I do recommend going with Matco or Snap-On screw drivers though. I find that the Craftsman ones have a tendency to slip and strip the screws. Also, they're grips aren't as comfortable and don't provide as much leverage.

FYI, you can knock the trans cross-member out with a BFH, but the spreader does make short, quiet work of removing it if you have one.
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  #28  
Old January 17th, 2010, 10:44 PM
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Saw this on slickdeals and remembered the thread over here.

http://slickdeals.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1813955

It's a bit complicated to get the deal, but if you want Craftsman, now is probably the time to bite.
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  #29  
Old January 17th, 2010, 11:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manimal View Post
Latex gloves are a great idea. That synthetic oil stinks and it is really hard to wash off.
Nitrile are even better; they have more resistance to chemicals and don't dissolve as easily as the latex gloves do.

I would also add a few cans of brake parts cleaner. Invaluable for clean-up.
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  #30  
Old January 18th, 2010, 09:51 AM
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I know Tommy was asking about hand tools and this is a bit of a depature but....
One of my favorite tools that rights a lot of wrongs is my porta power. Its a hydraulic pump with quick detachable duckbill and ram with multiple extensions and fittings. Its been on semi permanent loan for the past year to fix some of Janey's "contours". Having a quick easliy set up hydraulic tool to help align things (have used it on walls in homes, window sills etc), spread frame rails so the crossmember drops right out, jack out dents,bend things back, etc is awesome.
Going to use it shortly to lift the roof on Gustavo's Shrek to pull the old style roof panels and install the late style parts.
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  #31  
Old January 18th, 2010, 12:39 PM
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Doug, agree with you on that. I picked up a kit to drop my crossmember and it has all of the attachments. Cool tool to have in the garage and it wasn't too expensive.
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  #32  
Old January 18th, 2010, 12:46 PM
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Charles Galpin
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Yes I <3 the porta power
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  #33  
Old May 24th, 2011, 09:36 PM
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Carl Jonsson
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Does anyone have a recommendation for a great auto electronics starter kit? I've looked around a bit and I was wondering if there is a particularly highly recommended kit with a wide variety of terminals, shrink tubing, etc. I'm going to start doing some simple wiring on the truck. I've never done it but I've observed enough that I feel comfortable with the idea.
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  #34  
Old May 24th, 2011, 10:38 PM
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I concur with the craftsman recommendation. There are much better tools out there (I love the limited Snap-on tools I have), but not for the money.

You can get a briefcase sized basic toolkit for ~$150 that isn't too big for storing in-vehicle. You can augment the basic all-in-one toolkit with 2-3 extra pairs of pliers (1 needle-nose, 1 normal, 1 very large) a vice grip, some screwdrivers, maybe a dogbone wrench and a few adjustable wrenches. Acquire specialty tools as needed as always been my philosophy. Other things that could help to have are tube of dielectric grease, a can of liquid wrench/pb blaster, a floor jack (to leave at home) a bottle jack (to keep in vehicle), some blocks of wood, a sawzall (with a few different blades), a breaker bar (and a 1/2"->3/8" socket converter, but use it carefully usually a person+breaker bar is stronger than a 3/8" socket), a propane torch (aka smoke wrench), a good electric drill (+bits), razor blades and some duct tape.

Also, if you're assembling a basic toolkit piece by piece, a good cheap/durable toolbox can be made from an army/navy surplus ammo box
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  #35  
Old May 25th, 2011, 02:39 PM
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Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see jack stands in the list. Good, strong, stable jack stands. I prefer the screw type, at least 3 ton capacity. And a 5-ton floor jack.
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  #36  
Old May 29th, 2011, 12:07 PM
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peter
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After working on the 90 for awhile (and similar with most vehicles) you find there is a pattern for what you actually use. I know its cool to have a mass of tools with, but I wonder what you will actually need to use. For whatever size you use I can see a wrench, shallow, and deep socket. But that should be like what 7-10 different sizes? I haven't torn into everything but I wonder what you'll actually use. The rest of the pliers, pry bar, pb, etc is a good idea. I plan on starting a white board in the garage and see what is actually used just because I never did that before and it interests me. Must be the engineer in me....
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