Enlarging harness holes in the frame? - Defender Source
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  #1  
Old April 30th, 2011, 07:30 PM
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Enlarging harness holes in the frame?

I need to make the holes in the frame for the wiring harness a bit bigger, the TD5 110 harness plugs are a little bigger.

I'm probably just being overly cautious, but is there anything special that needs to be done when making the holes bigger?

The factory holes seem to have a nice inwardly facing lip.
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  #2  
Old May 1st, 2011, 12:31 AM
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Neill Thornton
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If you want to be super extra double cautious you could find a grommet to fit the new hole to prevent chafing on the wires.... but other than that I can't imagine you need to do much.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 01:23 AM
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Andrew Najarian
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I would use a round file to take off the burrs and dull the edge after drilling at the very least. If you can find a rubber grommet the right size I would used that too, but definitely file the edges, you don't want any sharp edges that will chafe the wires and cause a short.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 04:40 AM
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Or pull the harness through from the front towards the back. That way you don't need to pull the ECU plugs through the "hole"

The Td5's don't seem to have any bigger holes than previous models.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 06:51 AM
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Thanks,

The plugs are a bit bigger than the ones on the 1983 harness, but as far as I can tell the ECU plugs don't have to run from the front to the rear. I think they are from the seat-box forward?

How bad would it be to do another bigger hole on the outside of the frame instead of making the one on the inside larger?

The TD5 frame wires came out on the outside of the frame.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 08:25 AM
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When I re-wired mine I ran everything through the new frame. I had one large black plug with the Purple main feed wire that would not make it through the inside frame hole. I had figured that the factory ran those wires through the outside hole, like you said. That said I didn't think that running the wires on the outside was a good idea so I had your same dilemma. I ended up cutting the purple wire and re-connecting it on the other side. The other plugs fit fine.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 11:14 PM
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Just run along the top of the rail, more than enough room and less problems with wear.
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Old May 1st, 2011, 11:28 PM
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Frankly that is terrible advice, running on top of the rail is ok for metal or rigid fuel and brake lines, but the wires will be much better protected within the chassis rail. It is possible for tree branches and the like to work their way up between the body and chassis. Andrew, please tell us about your experience with wear in the wiring running inside the rails. I have owned and wrenched on LR's for years, and disassembled tons of them and have never once seen or heard of wires that simply wore out due to being run inside the frame rails.

Tom, no problem really with enlarging the old hole as long as you get the new hole the right size for your grommet. Just make sure the wires will reach where they need to go if they emerge from the other side of the rail.

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Just run along the top of the rail, more than enough room and less problems with wear.
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Old May 2nd, 2011, 09:47 AM
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I was on my phone at the time. I should have added that I put all of my wiring in split loom shielding and it is wrapped end to end (twice) with electrical tape before being secured in place using zip-tie clips that have been mounted to the top of the rail.

The problem with the inside; and I should have mentioned it (it has come up before) is that when they're galvanized it can leave very sharp spiky drips inside the rails that can potentially damage the wiring. The other issue is if you need to weld the chassis to add patches (if not galvanized) then you risk damaging the wiring both when cutting away the bad material and when welding the new in place.
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  #10  
Old May 2nd, 2011, 12:25 PM
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simple, pull the wiring out before you weld. use a fish steel and leave that in there so you can pull it back through. your way is easier to make additions and changes to the harness but leaves the wiring exposed to potential physical damage. to each his own i guess, but still have yet to see or hear of any actual examples where your proposed scenario has occurred. what kind of zip tie clips are you using?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ajh View Post
I was on my phone at the time. I should have added that I put all of my wiring in split loom shielding and it is wrapped end to end (twice) with electrical tape before being secured in place using zip-tie clips that have been mounted to the top of the rail.

The problem with the inside; and I should have mentioned it (it has come up before) is that when they're galvanized it can leave very sharp spiky drips inside the rails that can potentially damage the wiring. The other issue is if you need to weld the chassis to add patches (if not galvanized) then you risk damaging the wiring both when cutting away the bad material and when welding the new in place.
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  #11  
Old May 3rd, 2011, 08:16 AM
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It's another situation where you have to think relatively. Is it better to fool around attempting to enlarge a frame hole and getting a larger grommet to fit properly or to run the wiring in a protected loom out of harms way ? I'd opt for the latter. In fact the factory wiring is exposed out of the frame in a number of locations. On my SIII I found two locations where the frame grommets had deteriorated or pulled out of the hole and the loom was chaffing against the now unprotected hole.
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