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  #21  
Old December 5th, 2014, 03:44 AM
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Chris
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After stripping/wire brushing I have been using rust converter then priming with Zinga which is 96% zinc , http://www.zinga-uk.com/product-range/zinga and painting with techno grip. http://www.versatileproducts.co.nz/s...rTop+Coat.html Have not used the truck yet since doing all this but seems to offer a lot of protection.
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  #22  
Old December 5th, 2014, 06:15 AM
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Waxoil waxoyl ... Pfft.

We used to have a few companies in the us that sold similar formulas as aftermarket add-ons to new cars and services here in the USA. Sued into bankruptcy and gone. People seem to use it religiously in the uk and constantly complain of frame rot. Its at very least no good if you dont keep at it.. Re-doing it every so often. I have good luck with prepping and painting. Anything fails over time and neglect. Although letting the engine leak does take care of the transmission crossmember......
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  #23  
Old December 5th, 2014, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefenderMd View Post
Waxoil waxoyl ... Pfft.



We used to have a few companies in the us that sold similar formulas as aftermarket add-ons to new cars and services here in the USA. Sued into bankruptcy and gone. People seem to use it religiously in the uk and constantly complain of frame rot. Its at very least no good if you dont keep at it.. Re-doing it every so often. I have good luck with prepping and painting. Anything fails over time and neglect. Although letting the engine leak does take care of the transmission crossmember......

I see you have zero experience with waxoyl.
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  #24  
Old December 5th, 2014, 10:01 AM
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Ben
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z.G View Post
I see you have zero experience with waxoyl.
With waxoyl brand? I'm not too brand conscious. British things I've owned have come with a waxy yellow buildup on their bottoms.. and I have to say. in those places that never rust, they weren't rusty. But in the nooks and crannies, inside door panels etc.. that's a different story.

But I am familiar with other dripless oil products that are the same thing.
Back when I was paranoid and looking for miracles.
It has its place. But I haven't found that to be on something that is exposed to the environment my vehicles go though.

I bet it would work reasonably well in hawaii... places where road salt and cinder are not issues, but salt air is. Of course.. on most cars, the undercarriage isn't the problem. the body is gone before the frame/subframe would ever be.

Point being... any attention you give is going to reflect. People that religiously oil their cars are going to be taking care of it. don't confuse correlation and causality. I have no problems using rustoleum... because I actually bother to do it.
Hell.. some people are still ziebarting their cars...
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  #25  
Old December 5th, 2014, 10:10 AM
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I've been treating my frame once the waxoyl is off with phosphoric acid where there is any bare metal and painting with POR-15 by hand and then over coating with Rustoleum for UV protection. I'm sure there's something better than rustoleum but its cheap and easy to get in can and brush form.
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  #26  
Old December 5th, 2014, 12:53 PM
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I've had trouble getting the surface prepped well enough for por-15. Have had it do great on a lot of things, but never under the car. Not where oil has ever been anyway. I always get it peeling off. Also of dubious nature is its imperviousness. I tried to use it on body panels once. Sandblasted (very rough)/prepped panel, por-15, por-15 HB primer... then epoxy over that.. the epoxy spidered like crazy. Had to pull the whole thing off. "por-15 is an impervious shell" Yea.. I basically started at one of the spiders and pulled the whole thing off. No tools or chemicals necessary. No adhesion at all. (one anecdote, but I've peeled it off other things too). Followed their data sheet to the letter.

I have had good luck with one of the other brands that's escaping me right now. Silver bullet? Is that it? But then again, I painted that directly on the rusty/dirty floor/frame/under floor of my jeep. It was on there tight. I know, because I painted over some bolts that I wish I hadn't.
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  #27  
Old December 5th, 2014, 01:12 PM
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I've certainly had the peeling issue on some surfaces, mostly aluminum despite etching. It is choosey, I've had it stick like crazy to filthy surfaces and peel on some like you describe. When it sticks, it is tough shit. If there is a cheaper alternative I'd like to try it. Regardless, I'm in the keep it clean and painted camp of rust prevention. Doesn't help on the inside much other than the keep it clean bit, in the winter here I hosed down the chassis of my former 109 regularly.
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  #28  
Old December 5th, 2014, 01:16 PM
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I like Eastwood's Internal Frame Coating, supposedly converts and seals rust, and Corroseal. My 90's frame had light-moderate surface rust, but no rot. I scraped and wire brushed what I could get at, flushed as much as possible then coated the inside w/ the Eastwood product. It comes with a long application wand, lays down kind of heavy and seems to really adhere. Coated the outside w/ Corroseal (where rusty), etching primer and NAPA chassis paint. Holding up well, but while the truck does see the beach, it doesn't go out in the winter, so can't say much about salty road durability.

I intended to Waxoyl it over what i did, but am holding off to see how this holds up. I am concerned about the effort to remove Waxoyl to touch up any rust. I guess if I had a new frame I would use Waxoyl, but I'd be concerned about spraying it over any existing rust.
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  #29  
Old December 5th, 2014, 01:30 PM
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Go old school. Mix 50-50 boiled linseed oil and turpentine. Dip a rag in this mixture and mop it on liberally. It will soak into rust and crevices and forms a barrier coat. It's cheap and works. It's what people did before there were such things as epoxy and cyanoacrylate paints.
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  #30  
Old December 5th, 2014, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefenderMd View Post
With waxoyl brand? I'm not too brand conscious. British things I've owned have come with a waxy yellow buildup on their bottoms.. and I have to say. in those places that never rust, they weren't rusty. But in the nooks and crannies, inside door panels etc.. that's a different story.

But I am familiar with other dripless oil products that are the same thing.
Back when I was paranoid and looking for miracles.
It has its place. But I haven't found that to be on something that is exposed to the environment my vehicles go though.

I bet it would work reasonably well in hawaii... places where road salt and cinder are not issues, but salt air is. Of course.. on most cars, the undercarriage isn't the problem. the body is gone before the frame/subframe would ever be.

Point being... any attention you give is going to reflect. People that religiously oil their cars are going to be taking care of it. don't confuse correlation and causality. I have no problems using rustoleum... because I actually bother to do it.
Hell.. some people are still ziebarting their cars...
I'm just pointing out that you don't have experience with Waxoyl(the brand/product), yet you're noting that it is not effective.

I am not here to say you're wrong, only that you shouldn't knock it until you try it. Discovery 2s have awful frames, yet after waxoyling my chassis I've gone through 2 winters and still have a mint chassis. All the painted and powdercoated items I've added are rusting profusely, yet the chassis and axles are perfect.

Just because a lot of British people use waxoyl/waxoil and a lot of british people have rust/rot, does not mean that it's related.
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  #31  
Old December 5th, 2014, 02:15 PM
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Ben
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You are right... of course.. .causation/correlation.

I suppose in vermont that is something to note. Er.. wait.. is that one of the states that stopped using salt? I remember growing up how everyone was complaining when they instituted that "no rust holes" policy.

Then again, a 2002 disco? I'm not familiar with them at all... but did they not have a coated frame? I haven't seen much in the lines of rust problems in cars newer than the mid 90s. With some exceptions of course.


Regardless.. I have found that a good paint on the outside and in the case of a box frame.. sticking the power washer in the drain holes etc to keep everything free of standing water... seems to do the trick.

On my current land rover... exmod... frame has very light intermittent surface rust over most of it.. but the front crossmember was filled with mud internally. Consequently, perfect frame everywhere water can drain, small hole in bottom of front cross member where it couldn't. I've been told the MOD waxoyls.. I find no trace of it. Just an even layer of impossible to wash off dirt. Like concrete completely covering the frame in a few micron layer. Takes a wire brush... heck.. it might be dirt impregnated waxoyl.

Then again, i think, based on the type of vegetatation I am pulling out of the axle boots.. It may have had some salt marsh operation. Possible royal marines. Looks like sea grass wrapped around everything under the truck.
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  #32  
Old December 5th, 2014, 02:29 PM
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We stopped using salt, it's brine now....and it's way worse. It's eating every vehicle on the road.

1999-04 Disco 2s got a thinner chassis than the d1/Def/RRC vehicles for "weight reduction" and "improved MPG"/. They're just painted like the rest of the Land Rover line up.

People with 04s are already doing galvanized chassis swaps.
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  #33  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 03:42 PM
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Dinitrol is the best rust treatment and preventative coating you could apply.



I'm currently in the process of doing a 110 right now with it. Amazing stuff, superior to Waxol.
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  #34  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 04:37 PM
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Waxoyl is best and cheapest.

Many of us use Waxoyl in UK when we want to have a cheap and effective protectant for the underside,particularly in for winter.As we have salt spread on our roads.I do it every year,after a good steam clean.And it keeps my vehicles like new year after year !
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  #35  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 04:49 PM
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I use Fluid Film on both my trucks (land cruiser and brand new tacoma). Fraction of the cost compared to Dinitrol and Waxoyl, super easy to apply, totally harmless. I usually apply twice a year, takes about half a day to do both.

Bought a 5 gallon pale 2 years ago and have about half left. Dont need to worry about overspray or getting on exhaust, its good for your skin and i actually think it smells nice lol
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  #36  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 04:56 PM
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Wax and Fluid Film are both preventatives. The Dinitrol is a treatment for existing rust and a preventative treatment. It should last about 7-10 years. (In the UK, it's not uncommon to get a 10 year warranty, with 3 year inspection intervals) Biggest problem with Dinitrol is you can't buy it in North America... and getting it here isn't cheap, however, it's as good as you can get.
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  #37  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 05:11 PM
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Better, being that the first applied product converts any existing rust, and then a second product is a corrosion inhibitor It's more viscous and seeps deeper into seams and joints, and is "self healing". It's applied inside the frame and out, underbody, inside the bulkhead, B pillars etc.

Waxol is a good product (but it's old technology). Dinitrol is a modern, chemically engineered product that is more advanced, penetrates deeper and lasts longer.

Watch the video, and yes... prep work is very important.
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  #38  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 05:17 PM
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Everything in the US is treated as disposable by a majority of Americans, containers, cars, marriages, etc. That probably why these treatments haven't caught on. Why rust proof on a 2 year lease?
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  #39  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1of40 View Post
Ben, beautiful truck. I live near by and would be happy to show you what WD40 has done for me for 10+ years as a daily driver and 100k+ miles on Northern Virginia roads and East Coast trails as well. I personally use an air pressurized lawn fertilizer can and a $19 can of WD40 twice a year or so. The key is to start clean and keep it clean, which does not sound like a problem in your case. In full disclosure I have not used waxoyl. Reason being it seems like a huge commitment to keep up with IMO. WD40 allows me to always know what I'm dealing with. I've seen too many waxoyl applications That have not been kept up to peak performance which becomes a nightmare. Clay
I do the same on my 110
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  #40  
Old October 23rd, 2015, 06:49 PM
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Honestly, if you apply a 50-50 mix of terp and linseed oil it does about the same as the snake oils. Smells good too.
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