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  #1  
Old January 17th, 2006, 11:39 PM
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Robert Dassler
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7000lb Trailer

I bought a used F250 for my business today and as part of the package I also got a 16' 7000lb tandem axle trailer. How many of you tow your Land Rovers with a trailer this size and do you have any issues? Theoretically, it should be ok...a 1500-1800Lb trailer with a 4500Lb Land Rover (D1 or Classic, D90 is less) for a total of 6300Lbs. I know Johnathan has had issues with his, but I also have other people telling me that they regularly overload these trailers and that the axles are conservatively rated and they never have any problems. Does anyone else have any thoughts on this or information to share? I need to decide whether to put tires and some elbow grease into this trailer or turn it around and get something bigger.
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  #2  
Old January 18th, 2006, 12:05 AM
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I use mine all the time. Has one set of brakes. More than enough. I would not want bigger.
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  #3  
Old January 18th, 2006, 08:16 AM
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Jimy towed his 90 out to the ralley with his 7k trailer. His only real problem was with the tires that came with it. I would guess the tires that came with it were not rated for long term highway speeds. Do you know what the rating on the axles and tires are? Most come with axles that are rated for more then the rest of the trailer as Buck said.

Oh and is the F250 a diesel?
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  #4  
Old January 18th, 2006, 09:15 AM
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Robert Dassler
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I wanted a diesel, but could not find one I could afford that had less than 300,000 miles on it. I found a really nice 1997 2WD F250 longbed with an EFI 460 and a manual transmission with 115k miles. It also has a liftgate which I will really use going to the freight docks to collect transmissions. It came as a package with the trailer that was traded in with it. The trailer is a 1998 and the owner protected the railings and floor with additional wood to preserve it. It has new tires but they are cheap P rated passenger car tires. I got a good quote yesterday on some proper trailer tires. To make the trailer work for me I need to strip off the excess wood, make some minor wiring repairs, find some ramps, repack the bearings and install some real trailer tires. I'm ok with this as they nearly gave it to me to get rid of it as they were moving to a new location and had no room for it. I'd like to use it to tow the D90 to Arizona and Utah for vacation and maybe use it around town to recover customers cars if necessary...so I need it to handle any Land Rover I want to put on it. I spoke with the company that sold the trailer and they told me that the axles were rated for 3500lbs each. I don't yet know how the condition of the brake system, however, the truck is equipped with a trailer brake controller that works with this trailer.
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  #5  
Old January 18th, 2006, 09:38 AM
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FWIW
We get a number of trailers coming through our business every day (building materials). I frequently see 7k trailers hauling 2 pallets of portland cement (about 7000 lbs) or 3 yds of sand (also about 7000 lbs). We also see some loads that are down-right scary.... I hear of surprisingly few problems. Most problems seem to be related to poor quality or underinflated tires failing. Many of the guys who seem to know what they're doing run 15" rims and LT tires.
For what you are doing a tilt trailer with one of those little winches on the front would be the cat's ass in my opinion.

A question for you:
I see pickups hauling some pretty impressive loads these days, what with the diesels that are available today.
Do you think the brakes, drive train and suspension on these vehicles are up to the job when it comes to slowing down on mountain passes?

Thanks,
Rod
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  #6  
Old January 18th, 2006, 11:43 AM
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Robert Dassler
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Well,
Suspension and drivetrain, yes.....brakes, maybe. A diesel has no throttle plate to close so engine braking is minimal. If I were using a diesel to haul heavy loads in the mountains I would look into an exhaust brake and maybe some performance brake upgrades.
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  #7  
Old January 18th, 2006, 12:12 PM
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Nice score with the liftgate! and at least it's a 460 and not a 351, you should be able to move pretty quick with it. The trailer break control should be universal if you end up buying another trailer. If you are only really going to be taking the 90 on the long hauls you should be fine towing heavier Rovers around town as it doesn't stress the trailer too much at lower speeds.
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  #8  
Old January 18th, 2006, 08:45 PM
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Randy Black
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Rob I don't remember if I mentioned that my trailer is a 7000lb rated ( tandem 3500 axles ). It does fine hauling Rovers long distance but I do need to upgrade my tires.

I hauled a Rangie from Durango to Tulsa via Monarch Pass a few years ago. The trailer did fine but the Suburban didn't like it.
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  #9  
Old January 18th, 2006, 09:27 PM
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The steel 7000lb trailers like I've looked at weigh 2000 - 2200, giving them a payload of 4800-5000lbs. Granted, you can subtract the amount of weight that that rides on the tongue but you are still near the max load of the trailer with a heavy D90/D110.

Rough math and open for changes.

(2)3500lb axles - 2200lb trailer + 600lb tongue weight = 5400 payload. With a 4500lb D90 the trailer is at 83% of max capacity.
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  #10  
Old January 20th, 2006, 06:56 AM
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I tow my 90 soft top on a twin axle 7000# flatbed 16 foot trailer behind my powerstroke diesel F250 crewcab 4x4. Trailer has brakes on both axles, never had a problem. 16' is just the right size for a 90.
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  #11  
Old January 20th, 2006, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jase
The steel 7000lb trailers like I've looked at weigh 2000 - 2200, giving them a payload of 4800-5000lbs. Granted, you can subtract the amount of weight that that rides on the tongue but you are still near the max load of the trailer with a heavy D90/D110.

Rough math and open for changes.

(2)3500lb axles - 2200lb trailer + 600lb tongue weight = 5400 payload. With a 4500lb D90 the trailer is at 83% of max capacity.
I'm wondering what you have on your D90 that makes it weigh 4500 lbs? A stock D90 weighs 3560 lbs.
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  #12  
Old January 20th, 2006, 10:43 AM
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Robert Dassler
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I'm sure my D90 doesn't weigh 4500lbs...but a Discovery or Range Rover does and I want to use the trailer around town to recover cars to the shop as well as taking the D90 on vacation. So far the consensus seems to be that a 7k trailer will pull a D90 long distances. I appreciate everyones input.
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  #13  
Old January 20th, 2006, 11:32 AM
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Rob iv'e got a 7k 16ft and used it to tow to the national rally and back,only trouble i had was the cheap tyres that came with it.I had the landrover loaded with camping gear ,tools,two air bottles,a 20lb gas bottle ect.I was towing with an Expedition and had no problem and we were doing 70/80 mph
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  #14  
Old January 20th, 2006, 07:45 PM
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7000 lb GVWR trailers have two 3500 lb axles. If you're getting near maximum load, make sure the load range of the tires is sufficient (trailer-rated tires are ideal). VERY IMPORTANT: check tire pressures before you go, a severely underinflated one is amost guaranteed to blow. Also remember that tandom-axle trailer wheels experience severa side loads on sharp turns. This tends to loosen the lug nuts, so check them with with a torque wrench before every trip.

In most states a trailer this weight needs working trailer brakes, which is a very good idea anyway.

BTW I have an F-250 with a 460 of about this vintage (1995). For the 1995's at least, Ford rated the towing capacity of the manual transmission as alot lower than the manual; clutch strenght on the manual was the limiting factor. I have the auto on mine with a 4.10 rear end, whihc gives a GCVWR of 18,000 lbs. Substract out about 6K for the truck and you have a trailer weight of about 12K. Yours will be less with the manual, depending on your rear end.
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  #15  
Old January 20th, 2006, 08:06 PM
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Robert Dassler
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Well,
today I took the trailer for new shoes. I got rid of the p205s and stepped up to ST225 Goodyears. They are rated for 2500lbs each for a good safety factor. I have brakes on one axle. The truck is spec'd out for a camper and has a HD rear axle and HD suspension. It also has a HD ZF manual trans...I believe it will tow 12k lbs but I should double check the owners manual again. I also fabricated some ramps, so I am just about set to tow.
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  #16  
Old January 20th, 2006, 08:16 PM
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Sweet! We need pics!
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  #17  
Old January 20th, 2006, 10:15 PM
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Robert Dassler
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I'll do my best on the pictures....in the mean time I'm suppressing the urge to go buy a refrigerator so I can use the lift gate. I researched it and it is rated at 1000 lbs...very nice...pickups should just come with these from the factory. The only down side so far is that the truck seems to get about 9mpg....I can actually watch the gauge drop as I drive...ouch! Good thing it has dual tanks.
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  #18  
Old January 20th, 2006, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PT94D90
I'm wondering what you have on your D90 that makes it weigh 4500 lbs? A stock D90 weighs 3560 lbs.
My D110 weighs 4700 - 4800 lbs (on the scales). I've never weighed a D90 but: bumpers, sliders, winch, steel wheels, 35" MTs, armor, storage boxes, tools and a highlift add up. Even with a D90 @ 4500lbs, a 7000lb trailer is at 80-85% capacity using my math.
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  #19  
Old January 20th, 2006, 11:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jase
My D110 weighs 4700 - 4800 lbs (on the scales). I've never weighed a D90 but: bumpers, sliders, winch, steel wheels, 35" MTs, armor, storage boxes, tools and a highlift add up. Even with a D90 @ 4500lbs, a 7000lb trailer is at 80-85% capacity using my math.
Gotchya. I wasn't sure if that was a typo, or your D90 really did weigh 4500 lbs. I agree, that stuff can add up.

Here's a question...One of the mechanics at the shop I use suggested inflating the trailer tires about 4 psi under max as a safegaurd against a blowout once the tire heats up and expands. Anybody agree with this, or do you guys inflate them to max psi?
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