Ideas for increasing top speed of 1973 Series III - Page 3 - Defender Source
Defender Source  

Go Back   Defender Source > Defender & Series Technical Discussions > Series Technical Discussions


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #41  
Old August 1st, 2014, 09:09 AM
tim
Status: Offline
Timothy Homewood
Defender 50th going topless
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 114
Hi, ACR land rover (we site below) have a number of upgrades to improve the series engine..and if you have the power, the larger 235/85/r16 tyres increase the speed noticeably (though your guage will not show this.)

http://www.automotivecomp.com/index.html

Tim
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #42  
Old August 1st, 2014, 12:41 PM
Ignotus
Status: Offline
gene
1960 109, w/200TDI
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 3rd rock from the Sun
Posts: 401
I agree with Shayne(did I say that?) It is about steering that the OP feels uncomfortable at speed. First as some one suggested get some repair manuals and parts books. Second have some one wiggle the steering wheel as you follow the steering linkage to see what is loose. Put oil in the steering relay, that is the bit located in the front crossmember next to the radiator. This is best done with a syringe, take off opposing tiny bolts and fill to overflowing by injecting in 1 hole and using the other as a vent for bubbles. Be prepared for a mess. Another common issue is the steering box can come loose on the bulkhead support, this you will see if it moves around as SWMBO wiggles the steering wheel. Make sure the steering box has oil and is adjusted properly.
Follow the steering down and see if any of the tie rod ends(tre's) are worn out, replace if necessary. When you get to the wheels jack up one side and wiggle the wheel by grasping the sides. If loose it is the wheel bearing, tighten as required. Now grasp top and bottom and wiggle if loose it is the swivel pin. This requires the aformentioned repair manuals and a pull guage and shims.......

Then when all this is sorted get earplugs and be comfortable at Rover speed, 55-65. As you find rattles tighten things up and renew door seals.

HTH
__________________
Gene
1960 109
1960 88 Ignotus
Blog;
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old August 1st, 2014, 01:07 PM
meatblanket's Avatar
meatblanket
Status: Offline
Mike Simpson
1955 86 1986 ExMOD 110
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Golden CO USA
Posts: 582
Registry
Just as a point of reference I had a 2.25 petrol in a 88 IIa that would run at 65 on the flat comfortably in CO. So it's definitely achievable. You will never be able to hold the speed limit on the Eisenhower tunnel approach, or over Vail pass. If you want that, you'll need to ditch the 2.25.

I'd start off by carefully inspecting the steering, and alignment, as suggested in other posts. A set of radial tires, that have been balanced, will probably help as well. As others mentioned the 235 85 16 size works nicely. I'd lose the inner tubes also.

Once it is no longer "white knuckle" at 60 mph, you can then turn toward tuning and/or more extensive engine performance upgrades.

My experience with an OD has been that it doesn't actually add much speed (at least at altitude) but will quiet things down quite a bit so the engine doesn't sound like it's going to explode when you're at 70 mph.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #44  
Old August 1st, 2014, 01:26 PM
TeriAnn's Avatar
TeriAnn
Status: Offline
Teriann Wakeman
1960 Dormobile
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ USA
Posts: 247
Registry
I can not believe all the crappy advice that has been given so far. Some of it is very good but it is mixed in with some postings giving really bad advice. The postings that contradict each other are just confusing and a newbie can't be expected to tell the good advice from the bad. I'll try and put it all together. BTW a copy of the factory workshop manual is a must if you intend to work on your own truck.

No 1 priority make it safe and stable on the highway. If a Series truck is in good condition and in spec it is stable at highway speeds approaching 90 MPH.

You need to check the steering box play, the tie rod ends, and the steering bushings in the hub. The workshop manual tells you how to check these items. There should be no free play in any of them. When in doubt most front end alignment shops will give you a free inspection.

Series trucks have very tight alignment specifications. If you want a truck that is stable at highway speeds it is best to have the alignment professionally done. They can also replace bad tie rod ends at the same time. Chances are good that you have to supply them with tie rod ends & the alignment spec.

The steering bushings can be checked for gross wear by jacking up the wheel and wobbling it. But for a fine check you need to disconnect the tie rod ends and use a scale to see how much force is required to move the steering arm. If the wear on the bushings is not too much you can adjust the shim pack to get the proper adjustment. Again the workshop manual helps

While you are down there check the propshaft U-joints for wear. Bad U-joints cause the propshaft to wobble and can increase vehicle vibration as speed increases.

You want to have your tyres in proper balance and your rims straight. Take your truck to a shop and have them balance the wheels by mounting them on the machine by the lugs (called lug balance). Most shops mount the wheels to the machine through the centre hole. The centre hole in LR steel wheels are not guaranteed to be in the exact centre of the wheel and are usually a little off centre. Always get them lug mounted for the balance. Most shops fo not have the lug nut torque for a Series truck and some folks look up the Land Cruiser torque when they go to remount the wheels. When the person at the desk makes up the work order ask them to write down the lug nut torque spec on the work order (75-85 ft lbs for all civilian wheels. 100 ft lbs for wolf wheels only). While the work is being done it would not hurt to talk to the guy doing the work and tell him what the torque spec is.

Hopefully after getting the steering and wheel balance addressed the vehicle will be stable at any speed. If the alignment specs are correct and things seem to still be a little off, check the springs for broken leafs and the spring bushings for wear.

2. Gearing - The answer is simple keep it stock and if you want to buy something get an overdrive. Some folks have mentioned going to higher ratio ring and pinion sets and some have mentioned a high ratio transfercase. Don't listen to them. Coiler folks don't have a feel for leafer power, or lack there of. Doing either of these things will make the vehicle undrivable at altitude in the mountains. An overdrive will not let you go faster at high altitudes unless you are going down hill. Where an overdrive is really helpful is splitting gears. There will be a lot of times when 3rd is too low a gear and the engine just doesn't have the power to properly push 4th gear. In that case 3rd over is the perfect solution. Being able to split gears is really helpful in the mountains. Fairy overdrives are the weakest of the lot. I suggest either a Roamerdrive from Canada or the HST SuperDrive from Europe (Based on the super strong Santana overdrive). Either overdrive can give you a lifetime of service as long as you keep oil levels up.

3. Power - The 2.25L petrol really pretty gutless. You can pour a lot of money into a performance rebuild and still not have the power you need for high altitude highway cruising in the mountains. When I had a healthy 8:1 2.25 petrol engine in my Land Rover I found that there were highways in Utah that had both a Max and Min speed limit posted. My truck could not go fast enough to reach the min posted speed limit up hill. Sometimes you just have to live within the limits of the truck unless you want to change them with an engine swap.

On the other hand the LR engine is seriously overbuilt and will run smoothly when badly worn. So yes a compression check is one of the first things you should do. Follow that up with checking the distributor for shaft wobble and that both the mechanical and vacuum advances are working. If the engine has a lot of miles on it the timing chain can be stretched. It is best to time the engine by ear so you can compensate for a worn timing chain. And when in doubt, do a major tune up on the engine including new plug wires. It would not hurt to go to a shop and put a sniffer up the exhaust pipe to look at the air to fuel ratio. With less oxygen in the air you may have to go to a smaller main jet. You will get more power with the correct jet and probably save a little in fuel costs as well.

If you really want to rebuild the engine I strongly suggest selling off the 2.25L petrol and finding a 2.5L petrol from an early Defender. The 2.5 engine has a longer crank which gives you more torque to start with and the increased swept volume gives you a HP boost from the 2.25 right out of the box. The 2.5 starts out with the power of a highly tuned and modified 2.25 engine. If you want you can shave the head to 9:1 compression for even more power. All without adding a whole lot of money to the rebuild.

Of course there are a large number of engines that could be swapped in there but that is the subject of another thread.
__________________
TeriAnn
1960 Land Rover Dormobile, The go anywhere class B RV
1961 Triumph TR3A. Life is too short not to drive a classic British roadster.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old August 1st, 2014, 02:51 PM
meatblanket's Avatar
meatblanket
Status: Offline
Mike Simpson
1955 86 1986 ExMOD 110
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Golden CO USA
Posts: 582
Registry
Wow. TeriAnn's post pretty much sums it up. If you aren't able to find the problem, I'm local and would be happy to assist by taking a look at it for you.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old August 1st, 2014, 05:55 PM
rdavisinva's Avatar
rdavisinva
Status: Offline
Robert Davis
N/A
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 6,783
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdavisinva View Post
The 2.25 is not an engine designed for speeds above 50 MPH although it will go 60+ if in good shape on a flat.
This engine has about 75 - 80 HP. That's it.
Your 1973 (if the engine is original) is an early SIII and rated new @ 77 HP.
The main issue with the 2.25 is the very mild cam.
Way too mild to get any real performance and the head design breaths poorly.
Years ago I invested some big bucks trying unsuccessfully to build a 100 HP 2.25.
I bought a ACR "high performance" cam, a ported head, header, and used a 32/36 weber 2 barrell.
It dynoed in at 86 - 88 HP max.
The "performance cam" offered a better center line, but had almost stock lift with slightly more duration and did little to improve the performance.
Looked into getting some cam blanks to design and produce a better cam, but they were impossible to obtain unless you bought a full production run of something like 500 from the manufacturer in Spain.
That's when I sold all the performance parts, sold the engine and started building engine conversions, but that is a whole different story.

Overdrive is a waste of money in my opinion and please don't change your gearing as then you'll only use the higher gears on down grades because you haven't the power to pull higher gears on an upgrade.

You need to check your front swivel ball play.
If you're lucky the front play can be corrected by removing swivel ball shims, replacing any worn tie rod ends, and adjusting the steering.
A steering stabilizer will help, but don't use it to mask worn out or badly adjusted steering components.
Quote:
Originally Posted by REDrum View Post
That is VERY impressive! Was did you max for Tq?
It came in around 143 - 145 ft lbs.
I wasn't impressed with 86 -88 HP and the torque even though it was an increase over 77 HP without a rebuild with an overbore.

My next step was to build my first GM 4 cylinder engine conversion that had:
132 HP and 185 ft lbs of torque, but that is a different story that started over 20 years ago.
__________________
RDavisinVA

Uncle "Richard" Douglas has a Land Rover with big wheels that never gets stuck... until he breaks something so it won't go. Uncle Douglas always breaks something. - Anna Crowther at the Conclave 2012 (AKA Carburetor Neck)

"What's with this death wobble, Uncle Douglas, I can't keep it in 1 lane?"
UD: "Just Power through it man!"
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old August 1st, 2014, 05:58 PM
the rover shop
Status: Offline
shayne young
89,93 & 95 camel trophy 110s 06 130
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: ft lauderdale florida
Posts: 5,225
Should have bolted a small turbo charger on it.. 2-3 psi would have done wonders..
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old August 1st, 2014, 06:10 PM
ezzzzzzz
Status: Offline
Mark Garrenton
Too many here or gone to list here
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Portsmouth Virginia
Posts: 758
Years back, I rebuilt my '71 IIA 88" using Dana axles and parabolic springs....oh, and a 4.3 V6/NV4500/Dana 300. I had that truck up to 85 mph dragging a loaded 1/4 ton trailer on Long Island. It was as stable as being parked... well, close anyhow. The biggest issue I had was that confounded worn out steering relay in the front crossmember. I rebuilt it. The required wrench was fabbed up and still hangs in my garage. The old 2.25 was built with a ported head, 2.5 cam, Weber 2bbl and a custom tri-Y header. It certainly performed better than stock (the header made the most difference and hangs in Robert Davis' garage today). Still, 80hp is 80 hp. The overdrive will not help do anything but lower engine rpms. If you've peaked the torque curve but still need more power then you are shit outta luck.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old August 1st, 2014, 06:40 PM
TeriAnn's Avatar
TeriAnn
Status: Offline
Teriann Wakeman
1960 Dormobile
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ USA
Posts: 247
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by the rover shop View Post
Should have bolted a small turbo charger on it.. 2-3 psi would have done wonders..
The 2.25L engines imported into North American have 3 main bearings. A turbo would do wonders for only a short time.

You would have to run out to the engine store and pick up a five main late 2.25 engine and even then you need to be very careful about pressures. You are much better off picking up a 200tdi (built over 21 years ago).
__________________
TeriAnn
1960 Land Rover Dormobile, The go anywhere class B RV
1961 Triumph TR3A. Life is too short not to drive a classic British roadster.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old August 1st, 2014, 10:56 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatblanket View Post
Wow. TeriAnn's post pretty much sums it up. If you aren't able to find the problem, I'm local and would be happy to assist by taking a look at it for you.
X2 I will add to her sage advice that getting the steering tight is easy, it is only money involved. My experience is the box is usually horribly out of adjustment, tie rods ends (ball joints in land rover speak) shot, and swivel pins worn. Thankfully, it is all easily accessible (woe be the person who has to replace the relay though) and easy to spot the issues. Beyond that, a good set of wheels and tires is key. I will say my SII with all new steering was more than fine with the speedo pegged and the motor screaming for mercy.
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old August 1st, 2014, 11:32 PM
the rover shop
Status: Offline
shayne young
89,93 & 95 camel trophy 110s 06 130
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: ft lauderdale florida
Posts: 5,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeriAnn View Post
The 2.25L engines imported into North American have 3 main bearings. A turbo would do wonders for only a short time.

You would have to run out to the engine store and pick up a five main late 2.25 engine and even then you need to be very careful about pressures. You are much better off picking up a 200tdi (built over 21 years ago).
It was said tongue in cheek.. But thanks for the history lesson.
Guessing a shot of nitrous would be a no-no also..???
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old August 2nd, 2014, 06:34 PM
Ignotus
Status: Offline
gene
1960 109, w/200TDI
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 3rd rock from the Sun
Posts: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by the rover shop View Post
It was said tongue in cheek.. But thanks for the history lesson.
Guessing a shot of nitrous would be a no-no also..???
I've thought about nitrous too. Since I have a 2.25D 88 and have the Sierra Nevada Mtns to go over (or around).........climbing them is a nightime thing doing 30-35 in 3rd on roads with 55-65 mph speed limits.
Every 1000ft in elevation requires around a 3% reduction in fuel due to less oxygen. The diesel injection pumps are internally fixed with the volume of fuel injected per cycle. So when at altitude it still gives the same volume of fuel as at sea level, thereby overfueling.
My thought was if one could carry a bottle of nitrous and meter it in to compensate for the altitude the 2.25D would not be such a dog up the mtns. Specially if it was computer controlled by and altimiter type device.
I don't know enough to make such a system though.
__________________
Gene
1960 109
1960 88 Ignotus
Blog;
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old August 2nd, 2014, 07:04 PM
rdavisinva's Avatar
rdavisinva
Status: Offline
Robert Davis
N/A
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 6,783
nitrous oxide caution unless you are kidding like Shayne!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignotus View Post
I've thought about nitrous too. Since I have a 2.25D 88 and have the Sierra Nevada Mtns to go over (or around).........climbing them is a nightime thing doing 30-35 in 3rd on roads with 55-65 mph speed limits.
Every 1000ft in elevation requires around a 3% reduction in fuel due to less oxygen. The diesel injection pumps are internally fixed with the volume of fuel injected per cycle. So when at altitude it still gives the same volume of fuel as at sea level, thereby overfueling.
My thought was if one could carry a bottle of nitrous and meter it in to compensate for the altitude the 2.25D would not be such a dog up the mtns. Specially if it was computer controlled by and altimiter type device.
I don't know enough to make such a system though.
I would think that nitrous oxide is too much volatility for a diesel.
With the higher compression 18 - 23 you could experience the top of the piston melting.

The most volatile boost throttle fuel that would be safe for a diesel under the best of circumstances is probably propane, but it is known to burn exhaust valves when used constantly.
__________________
RDavisinVA

Uncle "Richard" Douglas has a Land Rover with big wheels that never gets stuck... until he breaks something so it won't go. Uncle Douglas always breaks something. - Anna Crowther at the Conclave 2012 (AKA Carburetor Neck)

"What's with this death wobble, Uncle Douglas, I can't keep it in 1 lane?"
UD: "Just Power through it man!"
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old August 3rd, 2014, 05:46 PM
Ignotus
Status: Offline
gene
1960 109, w/200TDI
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 3rd rock from the Sun
Posts: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdavisinva View Post
I would think that nitrous oxide is too much volatility for a diesel.
With the higher compression 18 - 23 you could experience the top of the piston melting.

The most volatile boost throttle fuel that would be safe for a diesel under the best of circumstances is probably propane, but it is known to burn exhaust valves when used constantly.
Robert I think you miss understand me or I don't know enough about nitrous. My main thrust was to replace the oxygen missing at altitude. Since nitrous is denser than compressed air I was thinking that you could carry more Oomh in a smaller container. If you used, and I don't have any idea of what the correct numbers would be, say .01 oz/min at 5000ft to make up for the 15% reduction in oxygen. Not saying that I want to put in whatever the horsepower junkies do on the dragstrip.

I guess that's why they put turbos on to increase oxygen.

HTH
__________________
Gene
1960 109
1960 88 Ignotus
Blog;
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old August 3rd, 2014, 06:29 PM
rdavisinva's Avatar
rdavisinva
Status: Offline
Robert Davis
N/A
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 6,783
Try the small amount of nitrous oxide and let me know how it works for you.
It may do OK. I am no expert.
Careful because it might give you a good laugh.
__________________
RDavisinVA

Uncle "Richard" Douglas has a Land Rover with big wheels that never gets stuck... until he breaks something so it won't go. Uncle Douglas always breaks something. - Anna Crowther at the Conclave 2012 (AKA Carburetor Neck)

"What's with this death wobble, Uncle Douglas, I can't keep it in 1 lane?"
UD: "Just Power through it man!"
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old August 3rd, 2014, 06:37 PM
o2batsea's Avatar
o2batsea
Status: Offline
Bill Adams
66 109 sw 94 lwb
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: kensington md
Posts: 6,496
Registry
What....is the airspeed velocity of a laden swallow?
__________________
Bill Adams

1966 109 5 door wagon 300Tdi "spermaceti fueled"
1994 RRC LeWiB "ruining the air behind me"
1968 2A 88

All my troubles are Rover
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old August 3rd, 2014, 07:04 PM
the rover shop
Status: Offline
shayne young
89,93 & 95 camel trophy 110s 06 130
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: ft lauderdale florida
Posts: 5,225
North American or South African..??

------ Follow up post added August 3rd, 2014 07:05 PM ------

And on a completely different note... I had a girlfriend who wouldn't..
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old August 5th, 2014, 12:12 PM
TeriAnn's Avatar
TeriAnn
Status: Offline
Teriann Wakeman
1960 Dormobile
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ USA
Posts: 247
Registry
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by o2batsea View Post
What....is the airspeed velocity of a laden swallow?
In free fall? I would guess it depends on the resistance it presents to airflow and if it has reached terminal velocity. The Swallow side car presents a smaller cross section to air flow and just might drop a tad faster than the much larger Swallow cars.

Of course the later Swallow SS versions were more streamline than the earlier versions built on an Austin 7 chassis. And the cars built after WWII when the company changed its name to Jaguar Cars Ltd. became even more streamlined.

A would guess that it might depend somewhat if the car were falling nose first to take advantage of the streamlining or bottom first to present the maximum cross section to air flow. I also imagine that the difference in terminal velocity will not be enough to matter. What would matter would be the destruction of rare antique vehicles or side cars. I think if you were to drop a Swallow SS roadster at terminal velocity I would cry. It would be a terrible end to a lovely car.

How's that for trying to keep the thread on the subject of cars and relevant to JLR?
__________________
TeriAnn
1960 Land Rover Dormobile, The go anywhere class B RV
1961 Triumph TR3A. Life is too short not to drive a classic British roadster.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old August 5th, 2014, 12:14 PM
the rover shop
Status: Offline
shayne young
89,93 & 95 camel trophy 110s 06 130
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: ft lauderdale florida
Posts: 5,225
Land rovers aren't cars...
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old August 5th, 2014, 12:27 PM
TeriAnn's Avatar
TeriAnn
Status: Offline
Teriann Wakeman
1960 Dormobile
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ USA
Posts: 247
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by the rover shop View Post
Land rovers aren't cars...
A review of the 1964 Land Rover by Car and Driver magazine stated that "A Land Rover is less of a car than a state of mind."

So yes a Land Rover may primarily exist in the owner's state of consciousness which makes the short comings of the vehicle mostly irrelevant. A vehicle that exists both in the physical and metaphysical planes.

No wonder Homeland Security finds Land Rovers to be a threat to the mundane American way of life.
__________________
TeriAnn
1960 Land Rover Dormobile, The go anywhere class B RV
1961 Triumph TR3A. Life is too short not to drive a classic British roadster.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Defender Source > Defender & Series Technical Discussions > Series Technical Discussions

Tags
97, series, series iii, top

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Series III :: 1973 Land Rover Series III kraison Defender & Series Truck Registry 0 July 25th, 2014 03:07 AM
school me on increasing amps on alternator Overlander Defender Technical Discussions 31 December 13th, 2011 01:02 AM
front end shudder after increasing lift from 2" to 3-4" rgrrvr Defender Technical Discussions 0 January 19th, 2008 08:35 PM
1973 Series III 88 - $8500 ccalado1 For Sale - Vehicles 1 May 30th, 2007 09:10 PM
1973 Series III s3landy For Sale - Vehicles 15 March 13th, 2007 06:50 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:12 PM.


Copyright