Anyone restore an old house here? - Page 3 - Defender Source
Defender Source  

Go Back   Defender Source > Non-Technical Discussions > Misc. Chit-Chat


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #41  
Old May 20th, 2012, 08:46 PM
StphNieuw's Avatar
StphNieuw
Status: Offline
Stephan
Former owner of a 84 D90 RHD 2.5 NA
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Phoenixville PA
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij

Easier, yes, but the plaster and trim is amazing and I would like to save it. Basically the house has not been touched (other than keeping a roof on it) for 100 years. We are talking original sinks, toilets, closets with hooks in them rather than rods, etc.
Charm has its limitations, and also a big opportunity to go wrong. Trust me on that one, stuff normally breaks the 4th week after your moved in. Make sure you budget for stuff breaking. The difficulty often is finding matching parts, i.e. glass nob door handles, moldings etc.

Next time you are there check if any closets line up on each floor, when I was pulling new electrical line I was able to pull it from the panel in the basement to the 2nd floor via the closets on each floor.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #42  
Old May 20th, 2012, 09:09 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Got home too late for pictures.

I think it might be too much, but I will link the pictures when it hits MLS.

I am kicking myself for not doing a full price offer on the last one which had been redone.
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old May 20th, 2012, 11:43 PM
Uncle Douglas's Avatar
Uncle Douglas
Status: Offline
Doug Crowther
A defender in every driveway-motto
D-90 Source Vendor
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Gods Country- Central Virginia
Posts: 11,836
Registry
grow a set Ron. You are young and can afford it-go for it (says the man camping/calling home a house dating to the 1790's)
__________________
Good judgement comes from experience,experience comes from bad judgement.

Dividing Creek Imports
Worldwide Vehicle Shipment and Importation Service
Restoration & Modification work


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

410.693.1391


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #44  
Old May 21st, 2012, 09:24 AM
jefhuf's Avatar
jefhuf
Status: Offline
Jeff Huff
'94 D90 ST #655
D-90 Source Vendor
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Haymarket, VA
Posts: 1,660
Registry
Ron, like others have said I definitely would not shy away from the project...as for a couple of other points brought up, I may have missed it but not totally sure where the house is. I assume it is in the Philly/DE area. Geothermal is a nice option but for that climate will really only benefit you in the summer time as the winters will be cold enough that you will need to supplement with oil, gas or electric heating which is more or less a pick your poison argument of cost vs benefits. Also, I agree that PEX would be a good system for you as the pipe runs can be continuous for longer lengths without the need to glue or solder joints. Many people are afraid of PEX because the problems it had 8-10 years ago but like many products outside of the Rover world, they have made great advances with the quality of the fittings and we are actually seeing it as the preferred material for new construction in many of our high rise applications locally. As for copper, don't bother...CPVC and PEX are easier and cheaper to install and offer the same, if not better, performance and lifespan, particularly in a house with minimal insulation.

As a general contractor by trade, I think that you are smart enough to handle managing the project yourself and saving that money but it would probably benefit you in the long run of both time and money to employ professionals for MEP (mechanical, electrical, plumbing) work. In something like this project it is not a bad idea to have an insured company performing the work, although I assume you will be carrying a separate builder's risk policy/rider. If you want a more economical way to go, ask around and you can probably find a crew of electricians and plumbers who will do work on the side. This may push your schedule a little longer but it really comes down to how you define value. Not sure about your jurisdiction but most will require a plumber's license number if you are modifying or adding plumbing to the house.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old May 21st, 2012, 12:06 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
It is on the main line so inspections out the wazoo and crazy money to get stuff done. All I really care about is the electrical, the plumbing, structural issues (seems to have none at the moment--I guess 2ft thick stone walls last), and roof (which seems to be dry albeit clearly leaked in the past).

I can do paint, plaster, framing, sink plumbing, shower plumbing, small electrical (although I forsee a 40k bill to get it all up to code with romex and a 400 or 600 amp service).
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old May 21st, 2012, 01:11 PM
JimC's Avatar
JimC
Status: Offline
Jim Cheney
NAS 110 #145
Site Team
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Posts: 7,154
Registry
Buy it Ron.

I'm actually just amused at how many of us have Rover money pits and house money pits. I've got a couple 1907 Coast Artillery officer's quarters out in WA and, though the initial build quality was amazing, so too are the costs for fixing every little thing. I love the places though, and that is about the only thing that keeps me from selling everything for loss and moving on!
__________________
Jim Cheney

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old May 22nd, 2012, 06:02 PM
GYM's Avatar
GYM
Status: Offline
Gary
97 SW
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: West Coast
Posts: 1,062
150 years old? There couldn't have been too many Civil War era houses that had electricity originally. (Edison himself was only 15 years old in 1862.) If it did I'd think it would have been a DC current system anyway. (AC current was first used in a large commercial scale at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago, much to Edison's dismay.)

When was the electricity put in your house? The house I live in has an inspection sticker in the electric panel dated 1910 and still has the original solid copper wiring throughout it. We've been advised against tearing the quality copper wiring itself out. Assuming yours may have first been outfitted somewhere around the turn of the century, then you may have copper wiring running through it as well. Might be worth it to get some professional guidance and retain what you can.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old May 22nd, 2012, 07:01 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
It appears to be pre or circa WWI era.

Knob and tube. Some rooms do not even have outlets. It has twist or button switches for lights and some rooms do not even have lights.

As I understand it, all this stuff is fine for 15amp or below, but anything more and you have issues. The big issue is that it is all a mish-mash and I like things that plug into the wall.
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old May 22nd, 2012, 07:07 PM
tjfslaughter's Avatar
tjfslaughter
Status: Online
thomas
Burbon
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NorthEast
Posts: 4,563
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij
It appears to be pre or circa WWI era.

Knob and tube. Some rooms do not even have outlets. It has twist or button switches for lights and some rooms do not even have lights.

As I understand it, all this stuff is fine for 15amp or below, but anything more and you have issues. The big issue is that it is all a mish-mash and I like things that plug into the wall.
Don't get rid of those switches.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old May 22nd, 2012, 07:26 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjfslaughter View Post
Don't get rid of those switches.
Why not?

I was planning on keeping them all in a box and hoarding like everything else (this place is a hoarder's paradise).
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old May 23rd, 2012, 04:39 PM
tjfslaughter's Avatar
tjfslaughter
Status: Online
thomas
Burbon
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NorthEast
Posts: 4,563
They are cool. They can be cleaned up, I have only seen them in use in one house in my town and I thought they where a nice touch.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old May 23rd, 2012, 04:56 PM
Abrooks's Avatar
Abrooks
Status: Offline
Tony Brooks
.
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 4,926
A few thoughts:

When I bought my 1938 Cape 10 years ago it was in similar shape. It took 2 weeks of monkeying around trying to pull cable behind molding before I said f it and tore out the walls. It took a year of doing it myself evenings and weekends, but at the end I rewired, re-plumbed, insulated, wall boarded, put in new HVAC including the ducting, etc and had essentially a new house. Anything less would have been a compromise and I would do it the same way again.

We put an addition on the house last year and I did the wiring and finish plumbing, floors and finish carpentry ourselves. That's the stuff that's easy to do and will save you real money. The wiring estimate was $12K, I did it myself in a weekend. Save wall board and insulation for the professionals.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old May 23rd, 2012, 05:52 PM
usadventureracing's Avatar
usadventureracing
Status: Offline
Brett
110
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: US
Posts: 569
My house is from 1885, we have been living in it for 10 years and love it as old house have great character. We also put on an addition and I have done and still working on the finishing work, saved tons of money. I say go for it.
__________________
1983 ROW D110
1970 Series III (Parting out)
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old May 24th, 2012, 09:04 AM
bossman429's Avatar
bossman429
Status: Offline
Adrian
1988 90
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Red Bank, NJ, USA
Posts: 1,416
Registry
My house is 90 years old, I did alot of work but some was done before me.

Does the house have an open basement and attic? If so that will make your life alot easier as you can pull your electric up and down through them (limiting the amount of wall demo you have to do) ( you wont want to run plumbing in the attic obviously)


Side note -
knob and tube is actually a very efficient method to carry electricity, however once you start putting insulation and other crap around it it becomes very dangerous (its efficient b/c the lack of insulation on the wire helps it dissapate heat really well and thus you can carry more current through a smaller wire.


Plumbing wise, copper or PEX is fine. PEX is alot cheaper, and its very tough stuff (even if it is a plastic basically). With the price of copper these days its hard to justify it. You probaly have some galvanized piping which corrodes from the inside and really ruins water pressure (not to mention you should see how nasty the inside of a galv. pipe looks after just a few years.

Electric:
Get a new panel obviously, I'd even look into running a 200A service if your putting in Central Air down the road, its not a ton more $ Replace your panel with combo ARC fault breakers (especially in an old house, these sense and trip on small arcs (say from a picture nail in a wire) that might not trigger the breaker to trip on normal short circuit but are enough to start a fire. Also get a whole house surge protection in the panel (look into an Eaton | Cutler-Hammer panel with a CHSPT2ULTRA surge protector) http://www.eaton.com/ecm/idcplg?IdcS...=BR00404001EMy

I can get you a good price on one if you want (I work for Eaton)

My house is alot smaller, like 1500sq ft, so its hard to compare prices. But if I had to throw a number out there, with it all said and done I'd gues ~15-20K for the plumbing and electric by the time its all said an done.

------ Follow up post added May 24th, 2012 09:10 AM ------

Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij View Post
It is on the main line so inspections out the wazoo and crazy money to get stuff done. All I really care about is the electrical, the plumbing, structural issues (seems to have none at the moment--I guess 2ft thick stone walls last), and roof (which seems to be dry albeit clearly leaked in the past).

I can do paint, plaster, framing, sink plumbing, shower plumbing, small electrical (although I forsee a 40k bill to get it all up to code with romex and a 400 or 600 amp service).

Remember - there is new construction code and renovation code. What you dont touch DOESN't need to be brought up to current code. Also - renovation code is usually a lot less strict than new construction code.

a 400 or 600A servcie is overkill unless you are cooking meth in the basement Your never going to have every load in the house on at any one time. 200-225A service should be fine for 99% of people.
__________________
1967 Series IIa 109 5 Door - Work in progress
'98 Toyota Land Cruiser 100 Series
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old May 24th, 2012, 01:20 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Open basement, attic is actually a real third floor with 8ft ceilings. 15k-20k would be dirt cheap in my book. I was thinking 3x that for plumbing and electrical.
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old May 25th, 2012, 02:11 PM
bossman429's Avatar
bossman429
Status: Offline
Adrian
1988 90
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Red Bank, NJ, USA
Posts: 1,416
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilfij
Open basement, attic is actually a real third floor with 8ft ceilings. 15k-20k would be dirt cheap in my book. I was thinking 3x that for plumbing and electrical.
I don't think it would be that much. Maybe a little more than 20 but not nearly 3x as much
__________________
1967 Series IIa 109 5 Door - Work in progress
'98 Toyota Land Cruiser 100 Series
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old May 25th, 2012, 02:14 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Ok good news. I can dump 250k into this place and get it back out of it so ....
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old May 25th, 2012, 02:15 PM
rijosho's Avatar
rijosho
Status: Offline
Joshua
1995 Black ST - Rhinolined edition
Research Assistant/Eagle Eyes
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 16,557
Registry
Still no pics?
__________________
Quote:
I am talking purely from an aesthetics standpoint.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old May 25th, 2012, 02:19 PM
evilfij's Avatar
evilfij
Status: Offline
evilfij
I have never seen a rover in person
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: on the internet
Posts: 14,688
Just came up on MLS

http://www.pennsylvaniahomes.com/del...6059193/photos

http://www.sawbuck.com/property/Phil...-833-Buck-Lane
__________________
*not legal advice*
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old May 25th, 2012, 02:32 PM
rijosho's Avatar
rijosho
Status: Offline
Joshua
1995 Black ST - Rhinolined edition
Research Assistant/Eagle Eyes
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 16,557
Registry
Wow you're right - it's like a living museum inside. Does the furniture come with it? I'm going to have to say that the new kitchen and bathrooms, etc. will be way more expensive than the electrical and plumbing will be for this one. Looks really cool - I thought it'd have more than an acre out in PA though!
__________________
Quote:
I am talking purely from an aesthetics standpoint.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Defender Source > Non-Technical Discussions > Misc. Chit-Chat

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My house is getting foreclosed! Departing90 Misc. Chit-Chat 6 March 29th, 2009 03:13 PM
Restore or Not to Restore Heathbarcrunch Defender Technical Discussions 6 November 12th, 2007 03:05 AM
Architects, a rant... Emerson00 Misc. Chit-Chat 26 November 4th, 2007 07:59 PM
OT: NASA's JPL Open House - This weekend, May 14-15, 2005 arbik Misc. Chit-Chat 0 May 13th, 2005 06:47 PM
Restore of the forum Pt.2 chrisvonc Community News & Announcements 2 July 18th, 2004 10:03 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 AM.


Copyright